Nursing

Trocaire nursing students reviewing a patient’s medical chart.

Certificate Program | Practical Nursing
The Catherine McAuley School of Nursing

Contact the Program Director
Trocaire College has been educating compassionate, knowledgeable and devoted nurses to serve the greater Buffalo community for more than 50 years.  Our nursing students are grounded in Mercy traditions and armed with real-world clinical experiences at hospitals and healthcare facilities all over Buffalo, where they learn how to apply their hands-on laboratory skills and complex classroom fundamentals to situations they’ll face every day as they help heal Western New Yorkers. Nursing is a calling, and backed by their challenging, comprehensive and engaging Trocaire educations received in the Catherine McAuley School of Nursing, our students are empowered to answer that calling and find careers where they make a difference every single day.

Our Certificate in Practical Nursing prepares students to work as an integral part of a healthcare team in just 18 months. LPNS perform a variety of tasks and responsibilities within the framework of case finding, health teaching, and health counseling, and support patient care under the supervision of registered nurses and/or physicians. They are often employed in settings such as long-term care and rehab facilities, physician’s offices or home health care.

AAS Associate Program | Registered Nursing
The Catherine McAuley School of Nursing

Contact the Program Director
Trocaire College has been educating compassionate, knowledgeable and devoted nurses to serve the greater Buffalo community for more than 50 years.  Our nursing students are grounded in Mercy traditions and armed with real-world clinical experiences at hospitals and healthcare facilities all over Buffalo, where they learn how to apply their hands-on laboratory skills and complex classroom fundamentals to situations they’ll face every day as they help heal Western New Yorkers. Nursing is a calling, and backed by their challenging, comprehensive and engaging Trocaire educations received in the Catherine McAuley School of Nursing, our students are empowered to answer that calling and find careers where they make a difference every single day.

BS Baccalaureate Program | BS in Nursing (Bachelor of Science Degree with Major in Nursing (BS))
The Catherine McAuley School of Nursing

Contact the Program Director
Trocaire College has been educating compassionate, knowledgeable and devoted nurses to serve the greater Buffalo community for more than 50 years.  Our nursing students are grounded in Mercy traditions and armed with real-world clinical experiences at hospitals and healthcare facilities all over Buffalo, where they learn how to apply their hands-on laboratory skills and complex classroom fundamentals to situations they’ll face every day as they help heal Western New Yorkers. Nursing is a calling, and backed by their challenging, comprehensive and engaging Trocaire educations received in the Catherine McAuley School of Nursing, our students are empowered to answer that calling and find careers where they make a difference every single day.

Accreditation Information

Accreditation Information

Trocaire College’s Practical Nursing Certificate program is registered by the New York State Education Department and is accredited by the New York State Board of Regents, a specialized accrediting agency recognized by the U.S. Secretary of Education.

New York State Education Department
89 Washington Ave.
Board of Regents, Room 110 EB
Albany, NY 12234
518-474-5889

At the completion of the program, graduates are eligible to write the National Council Licensure Examination for practical nurse licensure.

 

Resources
Program Requirements
Admission Requirements:
  • Trocaire College evaluates students for admission using a holistic admissions review approach. This approach gives applicants the best opportunity to highlight their strengths and potential for success in the Nursing programs at the College. Students are evaluated based on academic metrics, experience, and personal attributes of maturity, motivation, persistence, and attitude.All items below are required for admission consideration:Academic Metrics
    • Official Transcripts from high school or GED; and, all post-secondary colleges/universities attended
    • High School Diploma (minimum 75% average) or GED Diploma with a minimum score of 2500
    • A cumulative college-level Grade Point Average (GPA) of 2.5 is the benchmark
    • A minimum grade of “C” in Biology (high school or college level)
    • Academic preparedness will be considered based on past courses and success in past courses
    • Attain a successful score on the HESI A2 Nursing entrance exam. Applicants should meet with an admissions counselor or their current Trocaire student service advisor to discuss readiness to take the A2 entrance exam

    Experience

    • Download, complete and submit the Experience Form OR submit a current resume with the following categories to organize your experience: Healthcare or Work Experience, Community Involvement/Service, and Healthcare Training, Licenses, or Certificates (if applicable). If submitting your own resume please include the following for each experience:
      • Name of employer/Community Organization
      • Location
      • Dates
      • Total hours
      • Short, detailed description of your activities/responsibilities
      • Contact names, phone numbers and/or email addresses

    Personal Attributes
    Students may choose to submit one of the three options below for the personal attributes of maturity, motivation, persistence, and attitude to be assessed.

    • Interview with Trocaire Admissions Counselor (please call 716-827-2545 to schedule)

    –OR–

    • Letter of Recommendation

    If this option is chosen, students should submit one letter of recommendation with their application. Please provide the recommender the following questions to include in their recommendation or download Recommender Form for the recommender to fill out.

    1. Please describe the setting in which you supervised the applicant. Give details about their responsibilities.
    2. Give an example of how the applicant does or does not demonstrate problem-solving skills. In your opinion, does the applicant have the maturity and emotional stability to function effectively? If you observed the applicant dealing with conflict or crisis, please describe the situation and how the applicant handled it.
    3. What qualities and traits does the applicant possess that would make them a successful nurse?
    4. What are some areas you think the applicant could improve?

    –OR–

    • Personal Statement

    Please choose A or B of the personal statement topics below and answer in 500 words or less.

    1. Why does Nursing appeal to you? What particular aspects or special fields of Nursing interest you most? What contributions will you make to the school and to your fellow students?Reflect upon and describe a strength and a weakness you have identified about yourself and explain how you use the strength to your advantage and what steps you have taken to overcome your weakness.   

    Optional Statement
    There may be areas of your background you want to share that are not addressed in other parts of this application. For example, if you think your transcripts, resume, or admissions questions do not accurately reflect your abilities and readiness for study in the Nursing programs at Trocaire, or if you have any breaks in education or employment, you may explain why in this optional statement.

 

Minimum Requirements:
  • A total of at least 48 semester hours with a Quality Point Average of 2.0
  • General Education:*
    • Social Sciences (PSY101, SOC101)
    • College Seminar (GS100) or College Success
    • (GS102), Humanities
    • (EN 101), Natural Science
    • (BIO130/130L, BIO131/131L)
  • Program Specific Requirements:*
    • NU114, NU115, PN104, PN105, PN106, PN107
    • A minimum grade of “C” (2.0) is required in all courses
Graduation Requirements:

 

Courses
  • Semester 1
    14/16
    English Composition
    3

    The course seeks to aid the communication process by developing the ability to write clear, concise, expository prose, with emphasis on pre-writing and revision. It assists the student in finding a voice and an audience. A research paper is required, thus techniques of writing a formal research paper are reviewed. (Fall, Spring and Summer Semesters)

    OR
    Advanced Composition
    3

    The course develops critical thinking, reading, and writing skills as they apply to the analysis of primary and secondary non-fiction books, articles, and essays from a range of academic and cultural contexts. The course emphasizes the techniques and principles of effective research-bases writing.

    Anatomy and Physiology I
    3

    An introduction to the general principles of human anatomy and physiology with emphasis on the structure and function of the cell, tissues, and the skeletal, muscular, cardiovascular, and lymphatic systems. Three lecture hours. (Fall, Spring and Summer Semester)

    Anatomy and Physiology I Laboratory
    1

    Laboratory experience coincides with lecture topics. Two laboratory hours.

    College Seminar*
    1

    The College Seminar is a course designed to provide students strategies for successful learning in college and beyond. Topics in the course include: learning styles, learning and study strategies, cognitive strategies, time management, goal-setting, note-taking, test-taking strategies, overcoming test anxiety, cultural diversity, and other issues that focus on enabling students to become better achievers.

    The course is one credit with a one hour laboratory. Students are requires to take this course in their first semester at Trocaire College. (Fall, Spring and Summer Semester)

    *Students must receive a grade of “C” (2.0) or higher to pass this course.

    OR
    College Success*
    3

    The College Success is a course designed to provide students strategies for successful learning in college and beyond. It is part of the Transitional Studies curriculum. Central to the course is students’ intensive work in learning strategies and the use of the diagnostic tool, Learning and Study Strategies Inventory (LASSI). Topics in the course include: learning styles, learning and study strategies, cognitive strategies, time management, goal-setting, note-taking, test-taking strategies, overcoming test anxiety, cultural diversity, and other issues that focus on enabling students to become better achievers.

    This course is three credits and is open only to new Trocaire students who participate in Transitional Studies. They are required to take this course their first semester at Trocaire College. (Fall and Spring Semesters)

    *Placement is based on participation in Transitional Studies

    *Students must receive a grade of “C” (2.0) or higher to pass this course.

    General Psychology
    3

    An introduction to the basic concepts, research methods and applications of psychology. The major theoretical perspectives are presented through such areas as sensation, perception, intelligence, cognition, personality, and abnormal behavior. The course requires a research paper. (Fall, Spring and Summer Semesters)

    Principles of Sociology
    3

    A basic survey of the history and fundamental principles of Sociology. Examines several of the important contributors to the discipline, its operative concepts, and its terminology. Also, studies human groups and interactions, social institutions, and the role of the group in human socialization and development. (Fall, Spring and Summer Semesters)

  • Semester 2
    19
    Anatomy and Physiology II
    3

    A continuation of Anatomy and Physiology I. Study of the respiratory, nervous, endocrine, digestive, urinary and reproductive systems. Fluid and electrolyte balance also studied. Three lecture hours. (Fall, Spring and Summer)

    Anatomy and Physiology II Laboratory
    1

    Laboratory experience coincides with lecture topics. Two laboratory hours.

    Medication Essentials I
    1

    The theory component of this course will focus on pharmacological principles that the professional nurse applies in the administration of medications. The nursing process will be used as a framework to identify nursing responsibilities related to medication administration. The campus laboratory component will provide students with the opportunity to accurately calculate, prepare, and administer oral, topical, and injectable medications. Critical thinking situations and clinical application will be emphasized throughout the course. (Fall and Spring Semester – Day and Evening)

    Ten classroom hours and fifteen laboratory hours.

    Fundamentals of Practical Nursing
    7

    This course is designed to familiarize students with the historical development of nursing, nursing education, and the roles and responsibilities of the nurse and the healthcare team.  Development throughout the life cycle and basic nutrition and diet therapy will be discussed. A structured campus laboratory setting assists students in learning and integrating technical skills.  Clinical experiences will be provided in long-term and sub-acute health care settings.  (Fall and Spring semesters)

    Fourteen clinical hours per week (half semester)

    Sixty classroom hours and thirty laboratory hours.

    Practical Nursing II
    7

    This course focuses on the basic concepts of nursing. Psychomotor skills are demonstrated and practiced in the structured campus laboratory before they are applied in the clinical setting. Clinical experiences will be provided in acute care and sub-acurate health care settings.  (Fall and spring semester)

    Fourteen Clinical Hours per week (half semester)

    Sixty Hours and thirty laboratory hours.

  • Semester 3
    15
    Medication Essentials II
    1

    The theory component of this course will focus on the pharmacological principles that the professional nurse applies in the administration of medications and intravenous fluids. The nursing process will be used as a framework to identify nursing responsibilities related to major drug classifications, intravenous therapy and the use of intermittent infusion devices and pumps. The campus laboratory component will provide students with the opportunity to accurately calculate, prepare and administer medications via the intravenous route. Critical care and pediatric medication calculation will also be presented. (Fall and Spring Semester – Day and Evening)

    Twelve classroom hours and nine laboratory hours.

    Practical Nursing III
    7

    This course focuses on common health deviations which affects individuals of various ages.  The nursing process will continue to be utilized to provide care for patients along the continuum with an emphasis on material, child adolcent and family health.  Assisting children and adults with a  variety of health deviations will be discussed.  Advanced psychomotor skills are practiced and evaluated in the laboratory.  Clinical experience will be provided in maternal, family pediatric, and community settings.  (Fall and Spring Semesters)

    Seven clinical hours per week

    Sixty classroom and thirty laboratory hours

    Practical Nursing IV
    7

    This course focuses on common health deviations which affects the geriatric population.  The nursing process will continue to be utilized to provide care for patients in various health care settings, which include mental health, extended care, ambulatory, and community care health settings.  Leadership and management skills as it relates to the LPN scope of practice will be discussed.  Advanced psychomotor skills are practiced and evaluated in the laboratory.  Clinical experiences will be provided in acute, longterm and community care settings.  (Fall and Spring Semesters)

    Seven clinical hours per week .  Sixty classroom hours and thirty laboratory hours.

Accreditation Information

Accreditation Information

Trocaire College’s AAS program is registered by the New York State Education Department and is accredited by the Accreditation Commission for Education in Nursing (ACEN).

Accreditation Commission for Education in Nursing
3343 Peachtree Road, NE, Suite 850, Atlanta, Georgia, 30326.
Phone: (800) 669-1656, Ext. 153

At the completion of the program, graduates are eligible to write the National Council Licensure Examination for registered nurse licensure.

Pathways to Nursing Success Program: Learn More Here

Trocaire College has been educating compassionate, knowledgeable and devoted nurses to serve the greater Buffalo community for more than 50 years.  Our nursing students are grounded in Mercy traditions and armed with real-world clinical experiences at hospitals and healthcare facilities all over Buffalo, where they learn how to apply their hands-on laboratory skills and complex classroom fundamentals to situations they’ll face every day as they help heal Western New Yorkers. Nursing is a calling, and backed by their challenging, comprehensive and engaging Trocaire educations received in the Catherine McAuley School of Nursing, our students are empowered to answer that calling and find careers where they make a difference every single day.

Registered nurses are often on the front lines of direct patient care in hospitals and most other healthcare facilities. There’s more need than ever before for well-educated and highly trained RNs, and Trocaire’s curriculum prioritizes the knowledge and skills needed to promote, maintain and restore health within our diverse and ever-changing healthcare system. Our immersive clinical placements allow students to gain hands-on experience in various settings and identify a career path they’re passionate about.

Resources
Program Requirements
Admissions Requirements:

Trocaire College evaluates students for admission using a holistic admissions review approach. This approach gives applicants the best opportunity to highlight their strengths and potential for success in the Nursing programs at the College. Students are evaluated based on academic metrics, experience, and personal attributes of maturity, motivation, persistence, and attitude.

All items below are required for admission consideration:

Academic Metrics

  • Official transcripts from high school or GED; and, all post-secondary colleges/universities/educational institutions attended
  • High School Diploma (minimum 85% average) or GED Diploma with a minimum score of 2750
  • A cumulative college-level Grade Point Average (GPA) of 2.75 is the benchmark
  • A minimum grade of “C” in Biology (high school or college level) and Anatomy and Physiology I (college level)
  • Academic preparedness will be considered based on past courses and success in past courses
  • Attain a successful score on the HESI A2 Nursing entrance exam. Applicants should meet with an admissions counselor or their current Trocaire student service advisor to discuss readiness to take the A2 entrance exam.

Experience

  • Download, complete and submit the Experience Form OR submit a current resume with the following categories to organize your experience: Healthcare or Work Experience, Community Involvement/Service, and Healthcare Training, Licenses, or Certificates (if applicable). If submitting your own resume please include the following for each experience:
    • Name of employer/Community Organization
    • Location
    • Dates
    • Total hours
    • Short, detailed description of your activities/responsibilities
    • Contact names, phone numbers and/or email addresses

Personal Attributes
Students may choose to submit one of the three options below for the personal attributes of maturity, motivation, persistence, and attitude to be assessed.

  • Interview with Trocaire Admissions Counselor (please call 716-827-2545 to schedule)

–OR–

  • Letter of Recommendation

If this option is chosen, students should submit one letter of recommendation with their application. Please provide the recommender the following questions to include in their recommendation or download Recommender Form for the recommender to fill out.

  1. Please describe the setting in which you supervised the applicant. Give details about their responsibilities.
  2. Give an example of how the applicant does or does not demonstrate problem-solving skills. In your opinion, does the applicant have the maturity and emotional stability to function effectively? If you observed the applicant dealing with conflict or crisis, please describe the situation and how the applicant handled it.
  3. What qualities and traits does the applicant possess that would make them a successful nurse?
  4. What are some areas you think the applicant could improve?

–OR–

  • Personal Statement

Please choose A or B of the personal statement topics below and answer in 500 words or less.

A. Why does Nursing appeal to you? What particular aspects or special fields of Nursing interest you most? What contributions will you make to the school and to your fellow students?

B. Reflect upon and describe a strength and a weakness you have identified about yourself and explain how you use the strength to your advantage and what steps you have taken to overcome your weakness.   

Optional Statement
There may be areas of your background you want to share that are not addressed in other parts of this application. For example, if you think your transcripts, resume, or admissions questions do not accurately reflect your abilities and readiness for study in the Nursing programs at Trocaire, or if you have any breaks in education or employment, you may explain why in this optional statement.

Application Review:

The priority application deadline for a Fall start is April 1 and for a Spring start is November 1; however, applicants after those dates will continue to be reviewed until the program is full. Applications are reviewed by application date, continuously, and on a space-available basis. Admissions decisions are final.

Current Trocaire students seeking admissions to Nursing should submit their program transfer form no later than March 1 for Fall and November 1 for Spring.

Applications will continue to be reviewed on a space-available basis.

Minimum Degree Requirements:
  • A total of at least 67 semester hours with a GPA of 2.0
  • General Education Requirements:*
    • College Seminar (GS100) or College Success (GS102)
    • Humanities (EN101, EN102)
    • Natural Science (BIO130/130L, BIO131/131L, BIO223/223L)
    • Philosophy (PH103, PH205)
    • Social Science (PSY101, PSY102, SOC101)
  • Program-Specific Requirements:*
    • NU110, NU112, NU114, NU115, NU116, NU122, NU 124, NU214, NU217, NU220, NU222
    • During their second years of study, students are required to take two major nursing courses each semester.
    • *A minimum grade of “C” (2.0) is required in all courses. A “C-” grade is not acceptable.
Graduation Requirements:
Courses
  • Semester 1
    19/21
    Anatomy and Physiology II
    3

    A continuation of Anatomy and Physiology I. Study of the respiratory, nervous, endocrine, digestive, urinary and reproductive systems. Fluid and electrolyte balance also studied. Three lecture hours. (Fall, Spring and Summer)

    Anatomy and Physiology II Laboratory
    1

    Laboratory experience coincides with lecture topics. Two laboratory hours.

    English Composition
    3

    The course seeks to aid the communication process by developing the ability to write clear, concise, expository prose, with emphasis on pre-writing and revision. It assists the student in finding a voice and an audience. A research paper is required, thus techniques of writing a formal research paper are reviewed. (Fall, Spring and Summer Semesters)

    OR
    Advanced Composition
    3

    The course develops critical thinking, reading, and writing skills as they apply to the analysis of primary and secondary non-fiction books, articles, and essays from a range of academic and cultural contexts. The course emphasizes the techniques and principles of effective research-bases writing.

    College Seminar*
    1

    The College Seminar is a course designed to provide students strategies for successful learning in college and beyond. Topics in the course include: learning styles, learning and study strategies, cognitive strategies, time management, goal-setting, note-taking, test-taking strategies, overcoming test anxiety, cultural diversity, and other issues that focus on enabling students to become better achievers.

    The course is one credit with a one hour laboratory. Students are requires to take this course in their first semester at Trocaire College. (Fall, Spring and Summer Semester)

    *Students must receive a grade of “C” (2.0) or higher to pass this course.

    OR
    College Success*
    3

    The College Success is a course designed to provide students strategies for successful learning in college and beyond. It is part of the Transitional Studies curriculum. Central to the course is students’ intensive work in learning strategies and the use of the diagnostic tool, Learning and Study Strategies Inventory (LASSI). Topics in the course include: learning styles, learning and study strategies, cognitive strategies, time management, goal-setting, note-taking, test-taking strategies, overcoming test anxiety, cultural diversity, and other issues that focus on enabling students to become better achievers.

    This course is three credits and is open only to new Trocaire students who participate in Transitional Studies. They are required to take this course their first semester at Trocaire College. (Fall and Spring Semesters)

    *Placement is based on participation in Transitional Studies

    *Students must receive a grade of “C” (2.0) or higher to pass this course.

    Health Assessment and Promotion
    1

    This course is designed to assist students in acquiring knowledge of basic physical and psychosocial skills related to nursing practice and health promotion. Emphasis will be on normal assessment findings and recognizing deviations from normal. The campus laboratory provides the opportunity for instruction and practice of related nursing techniques. (Fall and Spring Semester – Day and Evening)

    Ten classroom hours and fifteen laboratory hours.

    Nursing Concepts
    5

    This course will focus on the nurse’s role in health assessment, health maintenance, and health promotion across the life span. Students are introduced to basic principles, skills, and concepts of nursing practice. A structured campus laboratory setting assists students in learning technical skills. Students will begin to integrate the roles of the Associate Degree Nurse as provider of care, manager of care, and member within the discipline of nursing through classroom, laboratory and hospital and community experiences. (Fall and Spring Semester – Day and Evening)

    Three classroom hours and six clinical/laboratory hours per week.

    Medication Essentials I
    1

    The theory component of this course will focus on pharmacological principles that the professional nurse applies in the administration of medications. The nursing process will be used as a framework to identify nursing responsibilities related to medication administration. The campus laboratory component will provide students with the opportunity to accurately calculate, prepare, and administer oral, topical, and injectable medications. Critical thinking situations and clinical application will be emphasized throughout the course. (Fall and Spring Semester – Day and Evening)

    Ten classroom hours and fifteen laboratory hours.

    Professional Issues I
    1

    An overview of the historical development of nursing and nursing education will be presented. Emphasis will be placed on the nurse’s role in the delivery of health care and the ethical and legal responsibilities relevant to the nurse in today’s society. Lecture, discussion and computer assignments will be utilized to promote student learning. (Fall and Spring Semester – Day and Evening)

    Seven and one half classroom hours.

    General Psychology
    3

    An introduction to the basic concepts, research methods and applications of psychology. The major theoretical perspectives are presented through such areas as sensation, perception, intelligence, cognition, personality, and abnormal behavior. The course requires a research paper. (Fall, Spring and Summer Semesters)

  • Semester 2
    16
    Microbiology
    3

    The study of scientific principles of Microbiology emphasizing the isolation and identification of pathogenic organisms to man in areas of bacteriology, mycology, virology and parasitology. The culture, morphology, general physiology, immunology and applied aspects of the representative micro-organisms will be studied. Three lecture hours. (Fall, Spring and Summer Semesters)

    Microbiology Laboratory
    1

    Laboratory experience coincides with lecture topics. Two laboratory hours.

    Medication Essentials II
    1

    The theory component of this course will focus on the pharmacological principles that the professional nurse applies in the administration of medications and intravenous fluids. The nursing process will be used as a framework to identify nursing responsibilities related to major drug classifications, intravenous therapy and the use of intermittent infusion devices and pumps. The campus laboratory component will provide students with the opportunity to accurately calculate, prepare and administer medications via the intravenous route. Critical care and pediatric medication calculation will also be presented. (Fall and Spring Semester – Day and Evening)

    Twelve classroom hours and nine laboratory hours.

    Health Restoration I
    6

    In this course, the Nursing Process will be used to identify nursing care needs of patients experiencing acute and chronic cardiovascular, respiratory, gastrointestinal, fluid and electrolyte and acid-base health deviations and diabetes. Assessment skills, basic concepts and health promotion will be incorporated. On-campus laboratory experiences will provide instruction and practice of advanced clinical skills. Clinical experience will be provided in an acute care hospital setting. (Fall and Spring Semester – Day and Evening)

    Three classroom hours, one seminar hour, two laboratory hours, and six clinical hours per week.

    Maternal Newborn Nursing
    2

    Classroom theory and clinical experiences will provide a foundation for nursing care of childbearing women through pregnancy, labor and birth, the post-partum period and newborn stage. The nurse’s role in health promotion, health maintenance and health restoration will be emphasized. Independent and supervised clinical experiences, lecture, discussion, seminars, simulation lab and computer assignments will be utilized to promote student learning.

    (Fall and Spring Semesters – Day and Evening) Classes begin early August for Fall semester and the first week in January for the spring semester. One and one half (1 1/2) classroom hours/week and twenty-three clinical hours per semester.

    Developmental Psychology
    3

    A study of the life span approach, from pre-natal development to aging and death. This course emphasizes physical, cognitive, intellectual, social, cultural and personality factors. Major theoretical perspectives and research findings, including cross-cultural studies, are applied throughout the course. (Fall, Spring and Summer Semesters)

  • Semester 3
    16
    Introduction to Literature
    3

    A study of the basic elements of short fiction, poetry and drama. By exploring form and design in the arts, this course provides opportunities for students to discover inter-relatedness of theme and type, to develop critical analysis skills, and to make connections with elements in other disciplines. Critical reading and analysis papers are required. (Fall, Spring and Summer Semesters)

    Health Restoration II
    5

    In this course, the Nursing Process will be used to identify nursing care needs of patients experiencing acute and chronic endocrine, hematological, musculoskeletal, respiratory, shock, sensory, and immunological health deviations. Concepts related to cancer will also be introduced. Clinical experiences will be provided in acute care hospital settings. (Fall and Spring Semesters – Day and Evening)

    Three classroom hours and six clinical hours per week.

    Pediatric Nursing
    2

    Classroom theory and clinical experiences will provide a foundation for nursing of children and their families from birth through adolescence. The nurse’s role in health promotion, health maintenance, and health restoration will be emphasized. Supervised clinical experiences, lecture, discussion, research and computer assignments will be utilized to promote student learning. (Fall and Spring Semesters – Day and Evening)

    Classes begin early August for fall semester and the first week in January for the spring semester.

    One and one half (1 1/2) classroom hours/week and twenty-three clinical hours per semester.

    Introduction to Philosophy
    3

    This course is an introduction into the basic issues of philosophy: Being, God, Knowledge, Meaning, Self, Reality, Evil and Death as they are found and presented in the history of Western Philosophy. (Fall, Spring and Summer Semesters)

    Principles of Sociology
    3

    A basic survey of the history and fundamental principles of Sociology. Examines several of the important contributors to the discipline, its operative concepts, and its terminology. Also, studies human groups and interactions, social institutions, and the role of the group in human socialization and development. (Fall, Spring and Summer Semesters)

  • Semester 4
    12
    Mental Health Nursing
    2

    This course utilizes the nursing process when providing care to patients experiencing psychosocial problems. The focus will be on health promotion, health maintenance, and health restoration. Roles of the Associate Degree Nurse as provider and manager of care and member within the discipline of nursing as they relate to mental health will be explored and applied. Lectures, seminars, and selected clinical experiences in hospital and community settings will be utilized as learning modalities. (Fall and Spring Semester – Day and Evening)

    Classes begin early-August for Fall semester and first week in January for Spring semester.

    One and one half classroom hours per week and twenty-three clinical hours per semester.

    Health Restoration III
    7

    In this course, the Nursing Process will be used to provide students with learning activities for patients experiencing acute and complex health deviations. Topics related to acute cardiovascular, neurological and renal health deviations, burns, women’s health, and disaster preparedness will be presented. Students are expected to function more independently, using previous knowledge and experience in assuming the role of educator, manager of care and provider of care for clients in a variety of clinical and community settings. (Fall and Spring Semester – Day and Evening)

    Three classroom hours and twelve clinical hours per week.

    Ethics in Health Care
    3

    Modern medicine and health care have created new human ethical problems. This course will explore a number of medical ethical dilemmas, such as end-of-life decisions, defining the concept of death, ordinary versus extraordinary means of treatment, reproductive issues, informed consent, confidentiality, truth-telling, withholding treatment, and the distribution of scarce medical resources, in the light of the principles of autonomy, non-maleficence, beneficence, and justice. One semester of clinical experience is strongly recommended. (Fall, Spring and Summer Semesters)

Accreditation Information

Accreditation Information

Trocaire College’s BS in Nursing program is registered by the New York State Education Department and is accredited with conditions by the Accreditation Commission for Education in Nursing (ACEN).

Bachelor Science Nursing

Accreditation Commission for Education in Nursing
3343 Peachtree Road, NE, Suite 850, Atlanta, Georgia, 30326.
Phone: (800) 669-1656, Ext. 153

 

 

Trocaire College has been educating compassionate, knowledgeable and devoted nurses to serve the greater Buffalo community for more than 50 years. The online RN to BS in Nursing (Bachelor of Science with a major in nursing program) is designed to prepare registered nurses with expanded role competencies and the leadership skills needed in today’s complex healthcare system. The program’s philosophy emphasizes the National League for Nursing (NLN) Framework (http://www.nln.org) identifying four competencies (2010).  These are Human Flourishing, Nursing Judgment, Professional Identity, and Spirit of Inquiry.

As a bachelor’s degree-prepared nurse, you will be required to use critical reasoning and clinical judgment every day. Students will base their practice on evidence, from research and best practice standards of nursing. Additionally, you will demonstrate unwavering compassion and respect for human life. Some nurses see this as a calling to the profession of nursing. The Catherine McAuley School of Nursing program empowers students to answer that calling and find careers where they make a difference every single day.

Registered nurses looking to gain the leadership and management skills needed for advanced careers in nursing and increase their salary potential can turn to Trocaire’s Bachelor of Science Degree with a Major in Nursing (BS). We emphasize nursing expertise beyond the clinical, such as patient education, health promotion, community health, healthcare across the lifespan, and technology integration. The program is flexible and convenient for the working nurse and is available online.

Resources
Program Requirements
Program Requirements:

Trocaire College evaluates students for admission using a holistic admissions review approach. This approach gives applicants the best opportunity to highlight their strengths and potential for success in the Nursing programs at the College. Students are evaluated based on academic metrics, experience, and personal attributes of maturity, motivation, persistence, and attitude.

All items below (Parts A, B, C) are required for admission consideration:

A. Academic Metrics

  • Applicants must hold an associate’s degree in Nursing from an accredited institution.  Applicants who have graduated from a program that is not accredited, but that is approved and registered with the New York State Education Department, are also eligible for admission.
  • Applicants must have earned a minimum cumulative GPA of 2.50 in their prior nursing program, and must have earned a minimum grade of “C” in all nursing courses. Applicants who have a GPA below 2.50 may be considered for the BS program if they have extensive clinical experience or extenuating circumstances.
  • Students who have graduated from an associate’s degree in nursing program, but have not obtained their nursing license, may be admitted to the program and allowed to take any or all courses offered in the first semester of study only. Students may not progress to the second semester of study without an RN license, which must be submitted to the Registrar.

B. Experience

  • Download, complete and submit the Experience Form OR submit a current resume with the following categories to organize your experience: Healthcare or Work Experience, Community Involvement/Service, and Healthcare Training, Licenses, or Certificates (if applicable). If submitting your own resume please include the following for each experience:
  • Name of employer/community organization
    • Location
    • Dates
    • Total hours
    • Short, detailed description of your activities/responsibilities
    • Contact names, phone numbers and/or email addresses

C. Personal Attributes

Students may choose to submit one of the three options below for the personal attributes of maturity, motivation, persistence, and attitude to be assessed.

  • Interview with Trocaire Admissions Counselor (please call 716-827-2545 to schedule

–OR–

  • Letter of Recommendation
    If this option is chosen, students should submit one letter of recommendation with their application. Please provide the recommender the following questions to include in their recommendation or download Recommender Form for the recommender to fill out.
  1. Please describe the setting in which you supervised the applicant. Give details about their responsibilities.
  2. Give an example of how the applicant does or does not demonstrate problem-solving skills. In your opinion, does the applicant have the maturity and emotional stability to function effectively? If you observed the applicant dealing with conflict or crisis, please describe the situation and how the applicant handled it.
  3. What qualities and traits does the applicant possess that would make them a successful nurse?
  4. What are some areas you think the applicant could improve?

–OR–

  • Personal Statement

Please choose A or B of the personal statement topics below and answer in 500 words or less.

  1. Why does Nursing appeal to you? What particular aspects or special fields of Nursing interest you most? What contributions will you make to the school and to your fellow students?
  2. Reflect upon and describe a strength and a weakness you have identified about yourself and explain how you use the strength to your advantage and what steps you have taken to overcome your weakness.

 

Optional Statement
There may be areas of your background you want to share that are not addressed in other parts of this application. For example, if you think your transcripts, resume, or admissions questions do not accurately reflect your abilities and readiness for study in the Nursing programs at Trocaire, or if you have any breaks in education or employment, you may explain why in this optional statement.

Additional non-admissions requirements for the program:

  • American Health Association CPR – Health Care Provider course is required of all students in the nursing program (online courses are not accepted). NYSED Office of Professions states, under the Professional Nurse Obligations, NYSED does not permit online CPR courses. Students must attend an NYSED Office of Professional Approved CPR course though the American Heart Association. *Check out Trocaire’s CPR courses here*
  • A student’s CPR card should not expire during the length of the clinical portion of the program. If it is due to expire during the programs students will be required to re-certify prior to being the clinical portion of the nursing program.
  • The BS program requires a total of 123 academic credits for completion.  Sixty-three of these credits must be in nursing and the remainder in the liberal arts/general education courses. Candidates may transfer up to a total of 33 nursing credits.  Exceptions may be granted to students transferring from a different BS program.  Liberal arts credits have no limit for transfer and are based on individual transcripts. Graduates of diploma nursing programs will be granted 33 transfer credits in nursing and must complete the liberal arts requirements.
Graduation Requirements:

 

Courses
  • Semester 1
    19
    Pathophysiology
    3

    (Formerly SC 210)

    A conceptual approach to the dynamic aspects of disease and how it affects normal physiology in relation to alterations, derangements, and mechanisms involved in disease. (Fall, Spring, and Summer Semesters)

    Race, Gender, and Literature
    3

    This course will seek to explore the ways in which literature addresses the issues of Race and Gender in the postmodern/postcolonial context. Breaking free from the traditional understanding of literature as an imaginative work of art, the selected readings will showcase the nexus between the literary and the political. The course will deal with the categories of ‘race’ and ‘gender’ as sociological constructs propagated within the political framework of ‘othering’. The lectures and readings will examine the varied representations and negations of the general understanding of these concepts, and how literary writers articulate their specific concerns to challenge the ideological tropes of our mainstream society. To explore the issues of race and gender, students will be introduced to works by the twentieth century African, Caribbean, African American writers, Black feminists, Queer theory, and Gay and Lesbian writing.

    Statistical Methods
    3

    This introductory statistics course focuses on several topics: population and samples; data organization and representation; measures of central tendency, variation, and position; basic probability and probability distribution; normal distribution; confidence interval; hypothesis testing of one population: z-test and t-test; type I and type II errors; linear regression; and non-parametric statistics. Statistics applications are drawn from several disciplines such as sociology, business, economics, ecology, health science, and psychology. This course uses a graphing calculator and computer statistical software.

    Comprehensive Health Assessments for Nursing Practice
    4

    Focuses on developing and utilizing comprehensive caring for individuals and population units across the lifespan.   Olans intervention strategies relative to the needs, problems, and level of wellness of the population unit. Emphasizes systematic and comprehensive health assessments will be emphasized as a database for identifying nursing diagnoses and nursing intervention plans.  Combines lecture and on-campus simulation laboratory experiences to develop advanced skills in assessment of physical, cognitive, spiritual, socioeconomic, genetic and environmental domains.

    Nursing Theory and Practice Issues
    3

    Students will explore selected nursing theorists and the concepts of person, health and environment as a basis for implementing and evaluating nursing care. Issues and trends that influence professional nursing practice will be discussed. How the practice of nursing has adapted to change throughout the years and how today’s health care delivery impacts professional nursing practice will be addressed.

    Coping with Illness
    3

    This course offers a broad overview of the sociological aspects of coping with illness in our society. Topics include: attitudes toward and preparation for death; attitudes towards serious illness in society; the understanding of and care for terminally ill patients; funeral rituals; grief counseling; suicide; and euthanasia. Readings and classroom activities will be supplemented by students’ self-exploration and writing on feelings, attitudes, and beliefs about coping with illness.

  • Semester 2
    17
    Nutrition & Wellness
    3

    A study of the principles of the science of nutrition, as it relates to daily life and well-being. Topics include personal wellness, digestion, absorption and metabolism of nutrients, planning and evaluating dietary intake. The course will consider social, economic, and psychosocial factors in relationship to dietary practices. This course provides an opportunity to explore areas of special interest such as nutrition for various age levels, weight control, and physical performance. (Fall semester)

    Introduction to Nursing Care Informatics
    2

    Teaches the use of information technology to access, retrieve, organize and evaluate information related to evidence based nursing practice. Using a problem-based approach, students will use information technology resources to examine health related problems, obtain and organize pertinent information, and professionally communicate findings.

    Research Procedures in Nursing Practice
    3

    Emphasis is on accessing, analyzing and critiquing research in scientific literature to determine implications for practice. The importance of evidence based practice in relation to patient outcomes is examined.  Specific elements of the research process including problem identification, literature review, variables, research design, sampling concepts, data collection, data analysis and interpretation are explored.  Critical evaluation of research studies and the development of a research proposal including a review of the literature and design method will be included.

    Family Nursing Care Across a Lifespan
    3

    This course focuses on the family as a basic unit of society and promotion of family health across the lifespan. The role of the professional nurse as teacher, counselor and advocate will be emphasized in health promotion as well as dealing with the family unit challenged by acute, episodic illness/injury or chronic conditions/disabilities. The student will develop the skills to provide family-centered, outcome oriented nursing care to care for the needs of diverse families. Major theories related to family nursing will be explored. Topics include variables affecting families, family assessment, cultural diversity, anticipatory guidance, multigenerational families and family as care giver. The impact of adding, separating and dealing with the death of family members will be included.

    Pharmacology for the Registered Nurse
    3

    This course correlates knowledge of human physiology, pathophysiology, and pharmacology as they relate to the RN’s role in the administration of medication therapies across the lifespan.  The basic concepts of pharmacokinetics, metabolism, therapeutic and toxic effects, and drugs with multiple indications are discussed. Particular focus is given to the major neurological receptors. Prototypes of the major drug classes are used as a model to give a comprehensive view of pharmacological treatment of the major disease categories.

    Sociology Of Health And Medicine
    3

    This course is an introduction to the field of medical sociology. Its main thrust is on the sociological analysis of health or medical organizations and institutions. Another focus will include an examination of the social disparities in healthcare with respect to epidemiology and social status or age, sex, race, ethnicity, gender, and social class. The role of health professions in the United States will also be explored.

  • Semester 3
    9
    Community Health Nursing: Individual and Family
    3

    This course examines the nurse’s role in delivery of primary health/community based services focusing on health promotion, disease prevention and management of episodic illnesses. Addresses health risks of age groups across the lifespan within the context of family, culture, and socioeconomic level. Epidemiological considerations apply to community settings; public health mandates will be considered. Healthy People goals and other national initiatives provide direction for developing nursing strategies.

    Leadership and Management for Professional Practice
    3

    Focuses on the role of the professional nurse as a leader in today’s health care environment. Students will identify various leadership styles and compare and contrast leadership and management behaviors. Class discussions will include organizational structure and behavior, work place issues important to the nurse manager, delegation and change theory. Motivational and decision making strategies, conflict management principles, and quality care for positive patient outcomes and patient safety will be addressed.

    Organizational Psychology
    3

    Organizational Psychology attempts to understand and explain human behavior in organizational settings, including culture, structures, and communications. This course will introduce the methods, practices, theories, and research, which includes the psychological aspects such as work attitudes and motivation, as well as group dynamics, organizational communication, and structures. This course requires a research project.

  • Semester 4
    15
    Multiculturalism
    3

    The course in Multiculturalism takes an interdisciplinary perspective that addresses the major issues of culture including: race/ethnicity, social class, worldviews, generational differences, sexual orientation, disabilities, religion, and geographic location. Culture is addressed through the integration of related issues of personal identity development and experiences and the resultant choices of preferred styles of life, morals, ethics, and values from a western perspective, but also an appreciation of how this varies from non-western perspectives. This can be addressed within the parameters of the varied fields within the Liberal Arts including, but not limited to; English, History, Philosophy, Psychology, Sociology, and any branches within each.

    *Students must be in their fourth year of study (90 credits completed) to take this course.

    Clinical Seminar
    2

    Preceptor guided seminar in an area of student choice with an emphasis on the application of baccalaureate level nursing knowledge. Integrates evidence-based practice, clinical judgment, interprofessional perspectives and patient preferences to improve patient care. Differences between pedagogy and andragogy will be explored. Content derived from clinical situations will be encountered. Students will share clinical reports and raise critical questions regarding practice issues.

    Professional Nursing Syntheses / Clinical Capstone
    4

    This course will allow students to demonstrate integration of baccalaureate nursing knowledge and practice in professional systems and settings. Students will be provided opportunities for synthesis and evaluation of professional nursing role behaviors essential to care of clients experiencing complex care needs in a variety of settings. Emphasis is on critical thinking, communication, leadership, management and evaluation. The student is provided with a clinical immersion experience in a practice setting of their choice, with a professional nurse preceptor.

    Philosophy of World Religions
    3

    The term ‘philosophy’ comes from Greek roots meaning ‘the love of wisdom’. Philosophers ask questions such as: What is the meaning of life? What is a good life? This course will introduce students to the philosophical approach to religion and also to religious & ethical ideas from several global cultures. It will also prepare students in medicine, business and related fields for the diversity of religious and moral views they will encounter in the modern workplace in general and health care institutions in particular.

    Social Psychology
    3

    Social Psychology is a specialized field within Psychology that attempts to understand and explain human thought (mental process), perception, emotion, and behavior through intrapersonal, interpersonal, and group dynamics. Emphasis is on social perception, social influence, social relations, and applying them to western culture. Major theoretical perspectives and research findings, including multicultural aspects, are applied throughout the course.