Medical Assisting

E57 Trocaire student obtaining a blood pressure reading.

Certificate Program
Division of Allied Health and Professions | Medical Assisting

Contact the Program Director


Medical assistants have ample opportunities to advance in healthcare careers. Starting at Trocaire is a great first step.

Medical Assisting is an allied health profession that allows you to perform both back office clinical procedures and front office administrative responsibilities. Medical Assistants primarily find employment in outpatient or ambulatory healthcare facilities such as medical offices and clinics.

Clinical duties may include, but are not limited to:

  • Medical Histories & Vital Signs
  • Assist providers with various exams and minor office surgery procedures
  • Instructing patients about medications and special diets
  • Collecting/preparing lab specimens; Perform basic lab testing and phlebotomy
  • Electrocardiograms
  • Pulmonary Function Studies
  • Infection Control

Administrative responsibilities may include, but are not limited to:

  • Coding and filling out insurance forms
  • Customer/Patient Service
  • Updating and filing patient medical records
  • Understanding patient privacy/compliance
  • Scheduling appointments
  • Arranging for hospital admissions and laboratory services
  • Handling correspondences, billing and basic practice finances.

Medical Assisting students partake in a clinical practicum seminar which allows for hands-on experience in a real-world work environment. These externship hours help students gain confidence with the practical skills needed to succeed after graduation as well as provide an opportunity for professional networking.  Upon successful completion of our program, students will be eligible to take up to six (6) certification exams: Certified Phlebotomy Technician (CPT), Certified Clinical Medical Assistant (CCMA), Certified Medical Administrative Assistant (CMAA), Certified Medical Reimbursement Specialist (CMRS), Certified Billing and Coding Specialist (CBCS) and Registered Medical Assistant (RMA). Medical Assisting Certificate graduates are ideal candidates Associate’s degree programs in fields like Nursing and Surgical Technology.

Program Format
Time of Program: Day
Mode of Delivery: Hybrid (On-site/seated and Online)
Normal Time to Completion: 10 months

AAS Associate Program
Division of Allied Health and Professions | Medical Assisting

Contact the Program Director


Medical assistants have ample opportunities to advance in healthcare careers. Starting at Trocaire is a great first step.

Medical Assisting is an allied health profession that allows you to perform both back office clinical procedures and front office administrative responsibilities. Medical Assistants primarily find employment in outpatient or ambulatory healthcare facilities such as medical offices and clinics.

Clinical duties may include, but are not limited to:

  • Medical Histories & Vital Signs
  • Assist providers with various exams and minor office surgery procedures
  • Instructing patients about medications and special diets
  • Collecting/preparing lab specimens; Perform basic lab testing and phlebotomy
  • Electrocardiograms
  • Pulmonary Function Studies
  • Infection Control

Administrative responsibilities may include, but are not limited to:

  • Coding and filling out insurance forms
  • Customer/Patient Service
  • Updating and filing patient medical records
  • Understanding patient privacy/compliance
  • Scheduling appointments
  • Arranging for hospital admissions and laboratory services
  • Handling correspondences, billing and basic practice finances.

Medical Assisting students partake in a clinical practicum seminar which allows for hands-on experience in a real-world work environment. These externship hours help students gain confidence with the practical skills needed to succeed after graduation as well as provide an opportunity for professional networking.  Upon successful completion of our program, students will be eligible to take up to six (6) certification exams: Certified Phlebotomy Technician (CPT), Certified Clinical Medical Assistant (CCMA), Certified Medical Administrative Assistant (CMAA), Certified Medical Reimbursement Specialist (CMRS), Certified Billing and Coding Specialist (CBCS) and Registered Medical Assistant (RMA). Medical Assisting graduates are ideal candidates for bachelor’s degree programs in fields like Healthcare Management and Healthcare Informatics.

Program Format
Time of Program: Day
Mode of Delivery: On-site seated
Normal Time to Completion: 24 months

Resources
Program Requirements
Admission Requirements:
  • High School Diploma (minimum 75% average) or GED Diploma with a minimum score of 2500
  • Natural Science
  • 2.0 cumulative GPA with minimum grade of “C” in laboratory sciences for current and transfer students
Minimum Degree Requirements:
  • A total of at least 37 credit hours with a GPA of 2.0
  • General Education (11 credit hours):
    • Natural Science* (8 credit hours) BIO130/130L, BIO131/131L
    • Humanities (PH205)
  • Program Specific:* (26 credit hours):
    • HIT102, HIT218, MAS134, MAS233, MAS234, MAS235, MB119, MB213

*A minimum grade of “C” (2.0) is required in these courses.

Graduation Requirements:
Courses
  • Semester 1
    16
    Anatomy and Physiology I
    3

    An introduction to the general principles of human anatomy and physiology with emphasis on the structure and function of the cell, tissues, and the skeletal, muscular, cardiovascular, and lymphatic systems. Three lecture hours. (Fall, Spring and Summer Semester)

    Anatomy and Physiology I Laboratory
    1

    Laboratory experience coincides with lecture topics. Two laboratory hours.

    Medical Terminology
    3

    This course is a study of the language of medicine as it relates to all body systems. Emphasis is placed on the understanding of word roots, prefixes, suffixes and abbreviations. Terminology related to anatomy, physiology, laboratory, clinical procedures and pharmacology will be covered. Pronunciation and spelling will be emphasized.

    Anatomy and Physiology II
    3

    A continuation of Anatomy and Physiology I. Study of the respiratory, nervous, endocrine, digestive, urinary and reproductive systems. Fluid and electrolyte balance also studied. Three lecture hours. (Fall, Spring and Summer)

    Anatomy and Physiology II Laboratory
    1

    Laboratory experience coincides with lecture topics. Two laboratory hours.

    Orientation to Medical Assisting
    2

    This course is designed as a comprehensive overview of the profession of Medical Assisting. Learning opportunities are provided for the student to develop skills in the three areas of competencies for Medical Assisting–Transdisciplinary, Clinical and Administrative. (Fall Semester)

    Diagnostic and Clinical Laboratory Procedures
    3

    This course introduces the student to the theory and laboratory practice of diagnostic testing and techniques and clinical lab skills necessary for the Medical Assistant. Patient preparation for diagnostic testing will be emphasized. (Spring Semester)

  • Semester 2
    17
    Medical Office Systems & Procedures
    4

    This course covers the responsibilities performed by the medical administrative assistant in a contemporary medical office including patient relations, appointment scheduling, insurance billing and collection, management of medical records, and report generation.  Various simulated office procedures are included.  (Spring Semester)

    Medical Assistant – Clinical Procedures
    4

    This course provides the theory and laboratory practice of clinical procedures performed in a health care setting by a medical assistant. Theory includes study of vital signs, aseptic techniques, assisting with minor office surgery, general physical exams and a basic knowledge of possible medical emergencies. The role of providing empathy and support for the patient is emphasized. (Fall Semester)

    Healthcare Reimbursement
    3

    This course covers the principles of healthcare reimbursement. Students will learn how reimbursement systems affect healthcare organizations, providers, consumers and payers. Topics include the development of classification and information technology systems, managed care and government-sponsored healthcare programs, reimbursement methodologies, current healthcare regulations, compliance and revenue cycle management.

     

    Outpatient Coding, Classification & Reimbursement Systems
    3

    This course introduces students to principles and application of CPT and HCPCS level II procedural coding systems and ICD-10-CM diagnostic coding as it relates to ambulatory coding. The theory and practice of assigning diagnosis and procedure codes to ambulatory medical records using manual methods and encoder software systems will be used. Accurate code assignment and grouping (i.e. APCs) through interpretation of clinical documentation, the Official Coding Guidelines, regulatory requirements, and reimbursement methodologies will be covered. (Spring Semester)

     

    Ethics in Health Care
    3

    Modern medicine and health care have created new human ethical problems. This course will explore a number of medical ethical dilemmas, such as end-of-life decisions, defining the concept of death, ordinary versus extraordinary means of treatment, reproductive issues, informed consent, confidentiality, truth-telling, withholding treatment, and the distribution of scarce medical resources, in the light of the principles of autonomy, non-maleficence, beneficence, and justice. One semester of clinical experience is strongly recommended. (Fall, Spring and Summer Semesters)

  • Semester 3
    4
    Medical Assistant Clinical Seminar and Externship
    4

    A supervised clinical experience in an appropriate medical setting provides the student with an opportunity to apply clinical and administrative procedures and competencies. One hour weekly seminars will be scheduled to review clinical competencies, the clinical experience and current health and legal issues as it applies to the medical assistant. (Spring Semester)

Resources
Program Requirements
Admission Requirements:
  • High School Diploma (minimum 75% average) or GED Diploma with a minimum score of 2500
  • Natural Science
  • 2.0 cumulative GPA with minimum grade of “C” in laboratory sciences for current and transfer students
Minimum Degree Requirements:
  • A total of at least 64 semester hours with a GPA of 2.0
  • General Education:
    • EN 101 and GS100 College Seminar or GS102*
    • Humanities (PH205)
    • Natural Science* (BIO130/130L, BIO131/131L and BIO203*)
    • Quantitative Analysis Mathematics Elective**
    • Social Science (PSY101 or SOC101
  • Program Specific:*
    • BOT103, BU106, BU132, HIT102. HIT 201, HIT218, HIT219, MAS134, MAS233, MAS234, MAS235, MB119, MB213

*A minimum grade of “C” (2.0) is required in these courses.

**Students may choose from MA110, MA111, or MA120

Graduation Requirements:
Courses
  • Semester 1
    16/18
    Anatomy and Physiology I
    3

    An introduction to the general principles of human anatomy and physiology with emphasis on the structure and function of the cell, tissues, and the skeletal, muscular, cardiovascular, and lymphatic systems. Three lecture hours. (Fall, Spring and Summer Semester)

    Anatomy and Physiology I Laboratory
    1

    Laboratory experience coincides with lecture topics. Two laboratory hours.

    Keyboarding I and Document Processing
    3

    This is an introductory course focusing on a thorough understanding of the computer keyboard with touch typing techniques.  Formatting of basic documents such as business letters, envelopes, memorandums, and reports as well as proofreading skills will be developed.  (Fall Semester)

    English Composition
    3

    The course seeks to aid the communication process by developing the ability to write clear, concise, expository prose, with emphasis on pre-writing and revision. It assists the student in finding a voice and an audience. A research paper is required, thus techniques of writing a formal research paper are reviewed. (Fall, Spring and Summer Semesters)

    College Seminar*
    1

    The College Seminar is a course designed to provide students strategies for successful learning in college and beyond. Topics in the course include: learning styles, learning and study strategies, cognitive strategies, time management, goal-setting, note-taking, test-taking strategies, overcoming test anxiety, cultural diversity, and other issues that focus on enabling students to become better achievers.

    The course is one credit with a one hour laboratory. Students are requires to take this course in their first semester at Trocaire College. (Fall, Spring and Summer Semester)

    *Students must receive a grade of “C” (2.0) or higher to pass this course.

    OR
    College Success*
    3

    The College Success is a course designed to provide students strategies for successful learning in college and beyond. It is part of the Transitional Studies curriculum. Central to the course is students’ intensive work in learning strategies and the use of the diagnostic tool, Learning and Study Strategies Inventory (LASSI). Topics in the course include: learning styles, learning and study strategies, cognitive strategies, time management, goal-setting, note-taking, test-taking strategies, overcoming test anxiety, cultural diversity, and other issues that focus on enabling students to become better achievers.

    This course is three credits and is open only to new Trocaire students who participate in Transitional Studies. They are required to take this course their first semester at Trocaire College. (Fall and Spring Semesters)

    *Placement is based on participation in Transitional Studies

    *Students must receive a grade of “C” (2.0) or higher to pass this course.

    Orientation to Medical Assisting
    2

    This course is designed as a comprehensive overview of the profession of Medical Assisting. Learning opportunities are provided for the student to develop skills in the three areas of competencies for Medical Assisting–Transdisciplinary, Clinical and Administrative. (Fall Semester)

    Medical Terminology
    3

    This course is a study of the language of medicine as it relates to all body systems.  Emphasis is placed on the understanding of word roots, prefixes, suffixes and abbreviations.  Terminology related to anatomy, physiology, laboratory, clinical procedures and pharmacology will be covered.  Pronunciation and spelling will be emphasized.  (Fall and Spring Semesters)

  • Semester 2
    19
    Anatomy and Physiology II
    3

    A continuation of Anatomy and Physiology I. Study of the respiratory, nervous, endocrine, digestive, urinary and reproductive systems. Fluid and electrolyte balance also studied. Three lecture hours. (Fall, Spring and Summer)

    Anatomy and Physiology II Laboratory
    1

    Laboratory experience coincides with lecture topics. Two laboratory hours.

    Information Technology I
    3

    This course includes practical applications of microcomputers through the use of software packages. Topics include an overview of microcomputer hardware and the operating system, an overview of application software including expected features, comparative analysis and integration. Hands-on experience in the use of the operating system, a major spreadsheet package, a major word processing package, and a major database package. (Fall and Spring Semesters)

    Outpatient Coding, Classification & Reimbursement Systems
    3

    This course introduces students to principles and application of CPT and HCPCS level II procedural coding systems and ICD-10-CM diagnostic coding as it relates to ambulatory coding. The theory and practice of assigning diagnosis and procedure codes to ambulatory medical records using manual methods and encoder software systems will be used. Accurate code assignment and grouping (i.e. APCs) through interpretation of clinical documentation, the Official Coding Guidelines, regulatory requirements, and reimbursement methodologies will be covered. (Spring Semester)

     

    Healthcare Reimbursement
    3

    This course covers the principles of healthcare reimbursement. Students will learn how reimbursement systems affect healthcare organizations, providers, consumers and payers. Topics include the development of classification and information technology systems, managed care and government-sponsored healthcare programs, reimbursement methodologies, current healthcare regulations, compliance and revenue cycle management.

     

    Diagnostic and Clinical Laboratory Procedures
    3

    This course introduces the student to the theory and laboratory practice of diagnostic testing and techniques and clinical lab skills necessary for the Medical Assistant. Patient preparation for diagnostic testing will be emphasized. (Spring Semester)

    Medical Office Systems & Procedures
    3

    This course covers the responsibilities performed by the medical administrative assistant in a contemporary medical office including patient relations, appointment scheduling, insurance billing and collection, management of medical records, and report generation.  Various simulated office procedures are included.  (Spring Semester)

  • Semester 3
    16
    Pathophysiology & Pharmacology
    3

    Pathophysiology and Pharmacology is an integrated study of disease processes and the pharmacological agents used to treat them. The understanding of the actions of drugs, including absorption, distribution, metabolism, and excretion is emphasized. Focus is on description of disease by organ system, including etiology, symptoms, diagnosis, and treatment.

     

    Business Communications I
    3

    Principles and mechanics of effective written and oral communication will be studied in relationship to work and the process using electronic technology and working with teams. International communication will be introduced and studies of listening skills as well as the writing process will be explored. Review of basic English grammar emphasizing principles of punctuation, capitalization, sentence structure, and vocabulary; organizing, developing, and stylization of letters, memorandum, email, and reports will be stressed. Human relations in business writing and oral reporting will be covered. (Fall and Spring Semesters)

    Outpatient Coding, Classifications and Reimbursement II
    4
    Mathematics Elective
    3
    Medical Assistant – Clinical Procedures
    3

    This course provides the theory and laboratory practice of clinical procedures performed in a health care setting by a medical assistant. Theory includes study of vital signs, aseptic techniques, assisting with minor office surgery, general physical exams and a basic knowledge of possible medical emergencies. The role of providing empathy and support for the patient is emphasized. (Fall Semester)

  • Semester 4
    13
    Management Principles for Health Professionals
    3

    This course introduces students to supervisory concepts including planning, organizing, controlling, and budgeting techniques in a healthcare setting. Areas of focus will include staffing, communication, productivity, motivation, leadership styles, committee activities, teamwork and organizational culture. This course also introduces students to quality management, utilization review, and risk management.

     

    Medical Assistant Clinical Seminar and Externship
    4

    A supervised clinical experience in an appropriate medical setting provides the student with an opportunity to apply clinical and administrative procedures and competencies. One hour weekly seminars will be scheduled to review clinical competencies, the clinical experience and current health and legal issues as it applies to the medical assistant. (Spring Semester)

    General Psychology
    3

    An introduction to the basic concepts, research methods and applications of psychology. The major theoretical perspectives are presented through such areas as sensation, perception, intelligence, cognition, personality, and abnormal behavior. The course requires a research paper. (Fall, Spring and Summer Semesters)

    OR
    Principles of Sociology
    3

    A basic survey of the history and fundamental principles of Sociology. Examines several of the important contributors to the discipline, its operative concepts, and its terminology. Also, studies human groups and interactions, social institutions, and the role of the group in human socialization and development. (Fall, Spring and Summer Semesters)

    Ethics in Health Care
    3

    Modern medicine and health care have created new human ethical problems. This course will explore a number of medical ethical dilemmas, such as end-of-life decisions, defining the concept of death, ordinary versus extraordinary means of treatment, reproductive issues, informed consent, confidentiality, truth-telling, withholding treatment, and the distribution of scarce medical resources, in the light of the principles of autonomy, non-maleficence, beneficence, and justice. One semester of clinical experience is strongly recommended. (Fall, Spring and Summer Semesters)