Cybersecurity

Trocaire students discussing cyber treats shown on a large screen.

Cybersecurity Certificate

Contact the Program Director
The Cybersecurity Certificate program is a two-semester program that provides the foundational knowledge, skills and abilities prerequisite to a career in cybersecurity. Students will learn physical, logical, and wireless security concepts, malware concerns, social engineering exploits, operating system security settings, user authentication methods, access controls and mitigation techniques. Students will be encouraged (but not required) to sit for the CompTIA IT Fundamentals+, A+ and Network+ certification exams.

Program Format
Time of Program: Evening / Weekends, online
Mode of delivery: On-site, seated, online

AAS Associate Program
Division of Arts, Sciences and Professional Studies

Contact the Program Director
Trocaire’s Cybersecurity A.A.S. degree program prepares graduates with the necessary competencies to attain entry-level positions in Information Security and Security Assurance as computer security specialists and information security analysts. Through applied learning experiences, along with group/team-based learning to simulate a professional work environment, students acquire the foundation knowledge and skills necessary to pursue entry level positions and/or move on to baccalaureate studies in the field. With outcomes aligned with national standards, graduates of the program are positioned to contribute to and capitalize on the many opportunities created by this rapidly evolving and changing global industry.

Location
Most courses and labs are offered at the Trocaire Achievement Complex on Transit Road, Lancaster, NY. Students must take the GS100 (College Seminar) course at the college’s main campus in Buffalo, NY

The AAS in Cybersecurity Provides students with a fundamental understanding of the technological needs, threats, and vulnerabilities of hardware, software, operating systems, networks and the Internet. With a curriculum that provides coursework in statistics, ethics in data science and research methods, students are given the tools to examine operating systems, networks, tools and protocols needed to navigate, use, and manage security technologies as well as gain insight into the legal, social, and political dynamics of the cyber universe.

Program Format
Time of Program: Evening / Weekends, Online
Mode of Delivery: On-site, seated, online
Normal Time to Completion: 24 months (two academic years)

Courses
  • Semester 1
    15/17
    Introduction to Computer Hardware
    4

    This course focuses on computer hardware, in particular, the components of a personal computer. The specific component areas covered include: processors, motherboards, memory, storage, peripherals, portable hardware, and tools and test equipment. General areas/activities include: concepts, specifications, upgrading, and troubleshooting. The course has a highly hands-on orientation. A major activity is the selection of computer components by the class leading to the building of a personal computer by each student (which they then own). (Fall Semester)

    IT Foundations
    4

    This survey course provides an introduction to fundamental IT concepts, including networking. Topics include IT concepts and terminology, and an overview of: hardware, networking, software development, database fundamentals and security fundamentals. Upon successful completion of the course, the student will have a broad understanding of IT topics needed in today’s technology-based workforce.

    Introduction to Computer Software
    3
    College Seminar*
    1

    The College Seminar is a course designed to provide students strategies for successful learning in college and beyond. Topics in the course include: learning styles, learning and study strategies, cognitive strategies, time management, goal-setting, note-taking, test-taking strategies, overcoming test anxiety, cultural diversity, and other issues that focus on enabling students to become better achievers.

    The course is one credit with a one hour laboratory. Students are requires to take this course in their first semester at Trocaire College. (Fall, Spring and Summer Semester)

    *Students must receive a grade of “C” (2.0) or higher to pass this course.

    OR
    College Success*
    3

    The College Success is a course designed to provide students strategies for successful learning in college and beyond. It is part of the Transitional Studies curriculum. Central to the course is students’ intensive work in learning strategies and the use of the diagnostic tool, Learning and Study Strategies Inventory (LASSI). Topics in the course include: learning styles, learning and study strategies, cognitive strategies, time management, goal-setting, note-taking, test-taking strategies, overcoming test anxiety, cultural diversity, and other issues that focus on enabling students to become better achievers.

    This course is three credits and is open only to new Trocaire students who participate in Transitional Studies. They are required to take this course their first semester at Trocaire College. (Fall and Spring Semesters)

    *Placement is based on participation in Transitional Studies

    *Students must receive a grade of “C” (2.0) or higher to pass this course.

    College Algebra
    3

    A pre-calculus level algebra course. Topics include solving system of equations that contain either two or three variables, adding, subtracting, multiplying and dividing monomials and polynomials; factoring polynomials, simplifying rational expressions and solving linear equations and inequity expressions that contain absolute values.

    Prerequisite: High school Regents mathematics or placement exam score.

  • Semester 2
    15
    Linux/Unix
    3

    This course covers the major alternatives to Microsoft’s current client and server operating systems – Linux and UNIX. This important family of operating systems plays a key role in the Internet. Coverage includes both Linux and UNIX as a workstation operating system and as a network operating system. The open source software business model is covered. The course is hands-on and personal computers and operating computer networks are used to practice the concepts presented. (Fall Semester)

    Network Administration II
    3

    This course, along with CNA 210, are the capstone courses of the program. This course continues the coverage of CNA 210 Network Administration. The course is hands-on and operating computer networks are used to practice the concepts presented. (Spring Semester)

    SQL for Data Analysis
    3
    Ethics in Data Science
    3
    Introduction to Computer Forensics
    3
Resources
Program Requirements
Admission Requirements:

High school diploma (minimum 75% average) or GED Diploma with a minimum score of 2500

Minimum Degree Requirements:

A total of at least 62 semester credit hours with a Quality Point Average of 2.0

General Education:

Basic Communications – Minimum of 4 credit hours: EN101 (3) GS100* (1)**
Humanities – Minimum of 3 credit hours: PH206(3) – Ethics in Data Science
Natural Sciences: Biology Elective (3) Quantitative Analysis: MA107 (3) – Logical Reasoning and Decision Making MA110 (3) – College Algebra MA120 (3) – Statistics I
Social Sciences: PSY101 (3) – General Psychology PSY320 (3) – Research Methods: Techniques and Designs

Program Specific*

DA103 (3) – SQL for Data Analysis
CNA105 (4) – Introduction to Computer Networking
CNA112 (3) – Operating Systems
CNA264 (3) – Computer Security
CBY201 (4) – Programming Concepts and Methodologies CNA205 (3) – Intermediate Networking
CNA215 (3) – LAN Design and Management
CBY101 (3) – Introduction to Computer Forensics
CBY202(4) – Introduction to Programming in Java
CNA266 (4) – Network Security Hardware
CNA274 (3) – Seminar and Internship: Capstone Experience

Graduation Requirements:
Other:

* A minimum grade of “C” (2.0) is required. ** GS100 (College Seminar) must be taken at the main campus only.

Courses
  • Semester 1
    15/17
    Introduction to Computer Hardware
    4

    This course focuses on computer hardware, in particular, the components of a personal computer. The specific component areas covered include: processors, motherboards, memory, storage, peripherals, portable hardware, and tools and test equipment. General areas/activities include: concepts, specifications, upgrading, and troubleshooting. The course has a highly hands-on orientation. A major activity is the selection of computer components by the class leading to the building of a personal computer by each student (which they then own). (Fall Semester)

    IT Foundations
    4

    This survey course provides an introduction to fundamental IT concepts, including networking. Topics include IT concepts and terminology, and an overview of: hardware, networking, software development, database fundamentals and security fundamentals. Upon successful completion of the course, the student will have a broad understanding of IT topics needed in today’s technology-based workforce.

    Introduction to Computer Software
    3
    College Success*
    3

    The College Success is a course designed to provide students strategies for successful learning in college and beyond. It is part of the Transitional Studies curriculum. Central to the course is students’ intensive work in learning strategies and the use of the diagnostic tool, Learning and Study Strategies Inventory (LASSI). Topics in the course include: learning styles, learning and study strategies, cognitive strategies, time management, goal-setting, note-taking, test-taking strategies, overcoming test anxiety, cultural diversity, and other issues that focus on enabling students to become better achievers.

    This course is three credits and is open only to new Trocaire students who participate in Transitional Studies. They are required to take this course their first semester at Trocaire College. (Fall and Spring Semesters)

    *Placement is based on participation in Transitional Studies

    *Students must receive a grade of “C” (2.0) or higher to pass this course.

    OR
    College Seminar*
    1

    The College Seminar is a course designed to provide students strategies for successful learning in college and beyond. Topics in the course include: learning styles, learning and study strategies, cognitive strategies, time management, goal-setting, note-taking, test-taking strategies, overcoming test anxiety, cultural diversity, and other issues that focus on enabling students to become better achievers.

    The course is one credit with a one hour laboratory. Students are requires to take this course in their first semester at Trocaire College. (Fall, Spring and Summer Semester)

    *Students must receive a grade of “C” (2.0) or higher to pass this course.

    College Algebra
    3

    A pre-calculus level algebra course. Topics include solving system of equations that contain either two or three variables, adding, subtracting, multiplying and dividing monomials and polynomials; factoring polynomials, simplifying rational expressions and solving linear equations and inequity expressions that contain absolute values.

    Prerequisite: High school Regents mathematics or placement exam score.

  • Semester 2
    15
    Linux/Unix
    3

    This course covers the major alternatives to Microsoft’s current client and server operating systems – Linux and UNIX. This important family of operating systems plays a key role in the Internet. Coverage includes both Linux and UNIX as a workstation operating system and as a network operating system. The open source software business model is covered. The course is hands-on and personal computers and operating computer networks are used to practice the concepts presented. (Fall Semester)

    Network Administration II
    3

    This course, along with CNA 210, are the capstone courses of the program. This course continues the coverage of CNA 210 Network Administration. The course is hands-on and operating computer networks are used to practice the concepts presented. (Spring Semester)

    SQL for Data Analysis
    3
    Ethics in Data Science
    3
    General Psychology
    3

    An introduction to the basic concepts, research methods and applications of psychology. The major theoretical perspectives are presented through such areas as sensation, perception, intelligence, cognition, personality, and abnormal behavior. The course requires a research paper. (Fall, Spring and Summer Semesters)

  • Semester 3
    15
    Computer Security
    3

    Computer security is a critical issue in the computer and network field. This course covers the full range of threats and the responses for both networks and individual devices on the networks. Hardware, software, and procedural security solutions are covered. The course is hands-on and operating computer networks are used to practice the concepts presented. (Spring Semester)

    Introduction to Computer Forensics
    3
    Logical Reasoning and Decision Making
    3

    This course introduces students to both informal and formal logic; and students will use the developed logic to evaluate decisions for given situations. Topics include: informal logical games, logical fallacies, truth tables, logical equivalence, sentential logic with proofs, categorical logic, probability, expected value, and decision making. (This course is cross listed in Philosophy PH107-credit will not be granted for both PH107 and MA107)

    Cloud Fundamentals
    3
    English Composition
    3

    The course seeks to aid the communication process by developing the ability to write clear, concise, expository prose, with emphasis on pre-writing and revision. It assists the student in finding a voice and an audience. A research paper is required, thus techniques of writing a formal research paper are reviewed. (Fall, Spring and Summer Semesters)

  • Semester 4
    17
    Biology Elective
    3
    Programming Concepts and Methodologies
    4
    Network Security Hardware
    4

    In this experience-oriented course that employs industry-relevant instructional approaches, students will receive an in-depth, theoretical understanding of network security, providing them with the knowledge and skills necessary to design and network security. Students will have significant hands-on interaction with IT equipment that prepares them for certification exams and career opportunities support.

    Prerequisite: CNA264

    Seminar and Internship Capstone
    3

    A supervised 90 hour, on-the-job work internship experience in a computer networked setting. The internship provides the student with the opportunity to apply skills learned during the program. As a second option, an approved research project may be completed in lieu of the internship. Seminars will be used to review the work/project experience and cover career preparation.

    Research Methods: Techniques and Designs
    3

    Provides students with an introduction to research methods in the Behavioral Sciences. The assumptions and goals of the scientific method will be considered and various types of research techniques and designs will be studied. Students will learn the process of writing a research proposal and explore the ethics of research with human and animal subjects.