Massage Therapy

E56 Trocaire massage therapy student treating a patient.

Certificate Program
Division of Allied Health and Professions | Wellnes
s

Contact the Program Director


Employment of massage therapists is projected to grow 21% through 2029.

Trocaire’s newly reimagined certificate is Western New York’s fastest, most efficient route to completing your massage therapy education. Our students enjoy a dependable schedule, with no nights and no weekends required for classroom or clinical work.

The program combines lecture, laboratory experiences and a clinical component to provide a well-rounded and comprehensive understanding of both Eastern and Western massage therapy techniques. In addition to staffing our on-site massage therapy clinic, students participate in a variety of off-site clinical rotations at local facilities—a unique advantage of Trocaire’s program.

Healthcare has come to mean far more than hospital stays and doctor visits. Massage therapy techniques improve muscle tone and circulation and promote overall wellness, stress management and rehabilitation and massage therapists are at the forefront of a growing movement toward holistic wellness and the use of complementary therapies.

Graduates of the program will be eligible to sit for the NYS board licensure exam. Once licensed, graduates have wide-ranging career options that include wellness massage in spas, resorts, and cruise ships; sports massage in health clubs; medical massage in hospitals, rehab centers and chiropractic offices; stress-management massage in corporate offices; and owning and operating private practices.   This fascinating, flexible, hands-on career is for anyone who wants to help people discover the power of preventative, proactive care.

As part of a Mercy college, you will experience a caring environment with wraparound support and a holistic approach to student success. Educational technology and support, career services, Massage Therapy Club, Catherine’s Cupboard student food pantry and fun activities organized by the Student Life office are just a few of the added benefits of being part of Trocaire.

Certificate: Massage Therapy

Program Format
Time of Program: Day

Mode of Delivery: On-site/Seated

AAS Associate Program
Division of Allied Health and Professions | Wellness

Contact the Program Director
Healthcare has come to mean far more than hospital stays and doctor visits. The massage therapy industry is at the forefront of a growing movement toward holistic wellness and the use of complementary therapies. Massage therapy techniques improve muscle tone and circulation and promote overall wellness, stress management and rehabilitation.  Massage is an art and science of healing with more than 4,000 years of history behind it.  This fascinating, flexible, hands-on career is for anyone who wants to help people discover the power of preventative, proactive care.

Trocaire’s Massage Therapy Program combines lecture, laboratory experiences and a clinical component to provide a well-rounded and comprehensive understanding of both Eastern and Western massage therapy techniques. In addition to staffing our on-site massage therapy clinic, students participate in a variety of off-site clinical rotations at local facilities—a unique advantage of Trocaire’s program.

Graduates of the program will be eligible to sit for the NYS board licensure exam. Once licensed, graduates have wide-ranging options in both the types of massage they’ll practice and the settings in which they will work. Possibilities include wellness massage in spas, resorts, and cruise ships; sports massage in health clubs; medical massage in hospitals, rehab centers and chiropractic offices; stress-management massage in corporate offices; and general massage in private practices.

 

AAS: Massage Therapy

Program Format
Time of Program: Day

Mode of Delivery: On-site/Seated

Resources
Program Requirements
Admission Requirements:
  • High School Diploma (minimum 75% average) or GED Diploma with a minimum score of 2500
  • Biology
  • Minimum final semester average of 2.0 with minimum grades of “C” in laboratory sciences for current and transfer students
  • Cardiopulmonary resuscitation (CPR) training is required prior to clinical experiences and First Aid certification is mandatory prior to graduation
Minimum Degree Requirements:
  • A total of at least 38 semester hours for the Certificate, with a Quality Point Average of 2.0
  • General Education:
    • Natural Science* (BIO130/130L, BIO131/131L)
  • Program Specific*: BIO243,  MT104,  MT106, MT110, MT111, MT204, MT211, MT212, MT250, MT255
  • One, 3-credit hour “hands-on” Massage Therapy elective (other electives in the department are considered to be free electives)
    • *A minimum grade of “C” (2.0) is required.
Graduation Requirements:
Courses
  • Semester 1
    16
    Anatomy and Physiology I
    3

    An introduction to the general principles of human anatomy and physiology with emphasis on the structure and function of the cell, tissues, and the skeletal, muscular, cardiovascular, and lymphatic systems. Three lecture hours. (Fall, Spring and Summer Semester)

    Anatomy and Physiology I Laboratory
    1

    Laboratory experience coincides with lecture topics. Two laboratory hours.

    Western Massage Therapy Theory & Application II
    3

    This course provides demonstration and practice in advanced treatment techniques and knowledge including, but not limited to, medical massage techniques, patient assessment, treatment planning and documentation, inter-professional communication and hydrotherapy application. Additional topics such as adaptation of treatment sessions for special populations and recognizing characteristics of abused and neglected patients are also explored.   (Fall semester)

    Anatomy and Physiology II
    3

    A continuation of Anatomy and Physiology I. Study of the respiratory, nervous, endocrine, digestive, urinary and reproductive systems. Fluid and electrolyte balance also studied. Three lecture hours. (Fall, Spring and Summer)

    Anatomy and Physiology II Laboratory
    1

    Laboratory experience coincides with lecture topics. Two laboratory hours.

    Western Massage Therapy Theory & Application II
    3

    This course provides demonstration and practice in advanced treatment techniques and knowledge including, but not limited to, medical massage techniques, patient assessment, treatment planning and documentation, inter-professional communication and hydrotherapy application. Additional topics such as adaptation of treatment sessions for special populations and recognizing characteristics of abused and neglected patients are also explored.   (Fall semester)

    Professional Development
    1

    This course provides an in-depth study of professional ethics and business practices. (Spring Semester)

    Massage Therapy Practicum I
    1

    During the first clinical practicum experience, students practice massage therapy in a clinical setting under the supervision of a clinical instructor. The student clinic is open to the public and provides hands-on practice in an environment similar to the workplace.

  • Semester 2
    16
    Applied Pathophysiology
    4

    This course provides a detailed exploration of pathological conditions of the human body including presentation, etiology and treatment.  Additional related topics such as the inflammatory process, medical terminology, working with other health care providers and developing massage therapy treatment plans are also covered.

     

    Myology
    3

    This course presents an understanding of muscle mechanics, attachments and functioning at the biological, chemical and functional levels. The orientation of joints, muscles, and surrounding structures are identified. Pathological state and processes of joints, muscles, and surrounding structures are identified. This course includes classroom instruction and laboratory hands-on learning.  

     

    Myology/Kinesiology
    3

    This course presents an understanding of muscle attachments and function and an introduction to kinesiology.  Pathological state and processes of joints, muscles, and surrounding structures are further explored.  This course includes classroom instruction and laboratory hands-on learning.

     

     

    Massage Therapy Practicum II
    3

    During the second clinical practicum experience, students continue supervised practice of massage therapy in an on-campus or offsite externship location. The on-campus clinic is open to the public and provides hands on practice in an environment similar to the workplace, while the clinical externships explore various massage therapy specialty locations such as, but not limited to: Palliative Care, Oncology, Wellness, Medical, Spa, and Chiropractic. (Spring semester)

    Eastern Massage Therapy I
    3

    This course is an introduction to Asian massage, specifically 5-Element Theory and the philosophy of Shiatsu. The course will provide demonstration and practice. (Spring Semester)

  • Semester 3
    6
    Massage Therapy Elective
    3
    Neurology
    3

    An examination of the structure and function of neural tissue, the anatomy and physiology of the components of the Central Nervous System and the Peripheral Nervous System, embryology of the spinal cord and brain, nerve plexuses, spinal reflexes, and sensory and motor pathways. (Fall Semester)

Resources
Program Requirements
Admission Requirements:
  • High School Diploma (minimum 75% average) or GED Diploma with a minimum score of 2500
  • Biology
  • Minimum final semester average of 2.0 with minimum grades of “C” in laboratory sciences for current and transfer students
  • Cardiopulmonary resuscitation (CPR) training is required prior to clinical experiences, and First Aid certification is mandatory prior to graduation.
Minimum Degree Requirements:
  • A total of at least 60 semester hours for the Associate Degree, with a Quality Point Average of 2.0
  • General Education Requirements:
    • GS 100 College Seminar or GS 102 College Success*
    • Basic Communication (EN 101)
    • Humanities (EN 102)
    • Mathematics (3-4 credits)**
    • Natural Science* (BIO 130/BIO 130L, BIO 131/BIO 131L)
    • Philosophy (PH 103, PH 205)
    • Social Science (PSY 101) and one 3 credit social science elective)
  • Program Specific*:
    • BIO243, MT104, MT106, MT110, MT111, MT204, MT211, MT212, MT230, MT240
  • One, 3-credit hour “hands-on” Massage Therapy elective (other electives in the department are considered to be free electives)
    • *A minimum grade of “C” (2.0) is required.
    • **Math 107 is recommended and can be completed at any time during the four semesters.
Graduation Requirements:
Courses
  • Semester 1
    14/16
    Anatomy and Physiology I
    3

    An introduction to the general principles of human anatomy and physiology with emphasis on the structure and function of the cell, tissues, and the skeletal, muscular, cardiovascular, and lymphatic systems. Three lecture hours. (Fall, Spring and Summer Semester)

    Anatomy and Physiology I Laboratory
    1

    Laboratory experience coincides with lecture topics. Two laboratory hours.

    English Composition
    3

    The course seeks to aid the communication process by developing the ability to write clear, concise, expository prose, with emphasis on pre-writing and revision. It assists the student in finding a voice and an audience. A research paper is required, thus techniques of writing a formal research paper are reviewed. (Fall, Spring and Summer Semesters)

    OR
    Advanced Composition
    3

    The course develops critical thinking, reading, and writing skills as they apply to the analysis of primary and secondary non-fiction books, articles, and essays from a range of academic and cultural contexts. The course emphasizes the techniques and principles of effective research-bases writing.

    College Seminar*
    1

    The College Seminar is a course designed to provide students strategies for successful learning in college and beyond. Topics in the course include: learning styles, learning and study strategies, cognitive strategies, time management, goal-setting, note-taking, test-taking strategies, overcoming test anxiety, cultural diversity, and other issues that focus on enabling students to become better achievers.

    The course is one credit with a one hour laboratory. Students are requires to take this course in their first semester at Trocaire College. (Fall, Spring and Summer Semester)

    *Students must receive a grade of “C” (2.0) or higher to pass this course.

    OR
    College Success*
    3

    The College Success is a course designed to provide students strategies for successful learning in college and beyond. It is part of the Transitional Studies curriculum. Central to the course is students’ intensive work in learning strategies and the use of the diagnostic tool, Learning and Study Strategies Inventory (LASSI). Topics in the course include: learning styles, learning and study strategies, cognitive strategies, time management, goal-setting, note-taking, test-taking strategies, overcoming test anxiety, cultural diversity, and other issues that focus on enabling students to become better achievers.

    This course is three credits and is open only to new Trocaire students who participate in Transitional Studies. They are required to take this course their first semester at Trocaire College. (Fall and Spring Semesters)

    *Placement is based on participation in Transitional Studies

    *Students must receive a grade of “C” (2.0) or higher to pass this course.

    Western Massage Therapy Theory & Application I
    3

    This course provides an introduction to the practice of western massage therapy. Special emphasis will be placed on the movements of massage, as well as positioning, muscle groups, and bony landmarks. This course also includes companion topics such as infection control and standard precautions, Health Insurance Portability and Accountability Act (HIPAA) training, and an exploration of the uses, effects and chemical ingredients of powders, oils and other products used in the practice of massage therapy. The course provides an opportunity for demonstration, practice and evaluation of skills. (Fall semester)

     

    Western Massage Therapy Theory & Application II
    3

    This course provides demonstration and practice in advanced treatment techniques and knowledge including, but not limited to, medical massage techniques, patient assessment, treatment planning and documentation, inter-professional communication and hydrotherapy application. Additional topics such as adaptation of treatment sessions for special populations and recognizing characteristics of abused and neglected patients are also explored.   (Fall semester)

  • Semester 2
    13
    Anatomy and Physiology II
    3

    A continuation of Anatomy and Physiology I. Study of the respiratory, nervous, endocrine, digestive, urinary and reproductive systems. Fluid and electrolyte balance also studied. Three lecture hours. (Fall, Spring and Summer)

    Anatomy and Physiology II Laboratory
    1

    Laboratory experience coincides with lecture topics. Two laboratory hours.

    Introduction to Literature
    3

    A study of the basic elements of short fiction, poetry and drama. By exploring form and design in the arts, this course provides opportunities for students to discover inter-relatedness of theme and type, to develop critical analysis skills, and to make connections with elements in other disciplines. Critical reading and analysis papers are required. (Fall, Spring and Summer Semesters)

    Myology
    3

    This course presents an understanding of muscle mechanics, attachments and functioning at the biological, chemical and functional levels. The orientation of joints, muscles, and surrounding structures are identified. Pathological state and processes of joints, muscles, and surrounding structures are identified. This course includes classroom instruction and laboratory hands-on learning.  

     

    Myology/Kinesiology
    3

    This course presents an understanding of muscle attachments and function and an introduction to kinesiology.  Pathological state and processes of joints, muscles, and surrounding structures are further explored.  This course includes classroom instruction and laboratory hands-on learning.

     

     

  • Semester 3
    17
    Neurology
    3

    An examination of the structure and function of neural tissue, the anatomy and physiology of the components of the Central Nervous System and the Peripheral Nervous System, embryology of the spinal cord and brain, nerve plexuses, spinal reflexes, and sensory and motor pathways. (Fall Semester)

    Massage Therapy Elective
    3
    Eastern Massage Therapy I
    3

    This course is an introduction to Asian massage, specifically 5-Element Theory and the philosophy of Shiatsu. The course will provide demonstration and practice. (Spring Semester)

    Clinical Practicum I
    2

    The first clinical practicum experience provides the opportunity to practice massage therapy in an on-campus clinical setting under the supervision of a clinical instructor. The on-campus clinic is open to the public and provides hands on practice in an environment similar to the workplace. (Fall semester)

    Introduction to Philosophy
    3

    This course is an introduction into the basic issues of philosophy: Being, God, Knowledge, Meaning, Self, Reality, Evil and Death as they are found and presented in the history of Western Philosophy. (Fall, Spring and Summer Semesters)

    General Psychology
    3

    An introduction to the basic concepts, research methods and applications of psychology. The major theoretical perspectives are presented through such areas as sensation, perception, intelligence, cognition, personality, and abnormal behavior. The course requires a research paper. (Fall, Spring and Summer Semesters)

  • Semester 4
    17
    Professional Development
    1

    This course provides an in-depth study of professional ethics and business practices. (Spring Semester)

    Applied Pathophysiology
    4

    This course provides a detailed exploration of pathological conditions of the human body including presentation, etiology and treatment.  Additional related topics such as the inflammatory process, medical terminology, working with other health care providers and developing massage therapy treatment plans are also covered.

     

    Clinical Practicum II
    3

    The second clinical practicum experience continues practice opportunities for massage therapy in an external and/or on-campus clinical setting under the supervision of a clinical instructor. The on-campus clinic is open to the public and provides hands on practice in an environment similar to the workplace, while the clinical externships explore various massage therapy specialty locations such as, but not limited to: Palliative Care, Oncology, Wellness, Medical, Spa, and Chiropractic.  (Spring semester)

    Mathematics Elective
    3
    Ethics in Health Care
    3

    Modern medicine and health care have created new human ethical problems. This course will explore a number of medical ethical dilemmas, such as end-of-life decisions, defining the concept of death, ordinary versus extraordinary means of treatment, reproductive issues, informed consent, confidentiality, truth-telling, withholding treatment, and the distribution of scarce medical resources, in the light of the principles of autonomy, non-maleficence, beneficence, and justice. One semester of clinical experience is strongly recommended. (Fall, Spring and Summer Semesters)

    Social Science Elective
    3