Healthcare Informatics

Trocaire professor and students look at data on workstations.

Introduction

Healthcare Informatics focuses on the management, analysis and reporting of data and information from healthcare systems including hospitals, medical offices, health insurance plans, government healthcare providers and medical research facilities, with the goal of using such data to improve patient care delivery. Students are prepared to turn healthcare data into useful information which will help improve patient care and enhance fiscal and system efficiencies. This is accomplished by creating or implementing databases and other technology systems, recommending informatics solutions, and effectively collecting, storing, and accessing medical data for operational assessment. Students will understand and use data interfaces within healthcare department and providers.

This program is offered as Certificate, Associate in Applied Science and Bachelor of Science options and classes are offered as an evening/weekend format.


Certificate Program
Division of Arts, Sciences and Professional Studies | Health Information Management

Contact the Program Director
The certificate program is designed for people who are interested in Healthcare Informatics but do not desire to complete a degree.

Clinical Practicum (Internship)

Students in the certificate and bachelor’s program have the option to apply and integrate the knowledge and skills acquired throughout the program in an offsite healthcare informatics setting. This non-paid internship is typically offered during the day, during regular business hours. Every effort is made to accommodate students’ work schedules so they will be able to complete the required hours. Transportation, parking and other costs related to the practicum site is the responsibility of the student.

Introduction

Healthcare Informatics focuses on the management, analysis and reporting of data and information from healthcare systems including hospitals, medical offices, health insurance plans, government healthcare providers and medical research facilities, with the goal of using such data to improve patient care delivery. Students are prepared to turn healthcare data into useful information which will help improve patient care and enhance fiscal and system efficiencies. This is accomplished by creating or implementing databases and other technology systems, recommending informatics solutions, and effectively collecting, storing, and accessing medical data for operational assessment. Students will understand and use data interfaces within healthcare department and providers.

This program is offered as Certificate, Associate in Applied Science and Bachelor of Science options and classes are offered as an evening/weekend format.


AAS Associate Program
Division of Arts, Sciences and Professional Studies | Health Information Management

Contact the Program Director
The Associate degree program focuses on many of the same healthcare informatics curriculum goals found within the certificate program. However, since students are entering college for the first time, the program also emphasizes computer science courses, mathematics and liberal arts. Students entering the healthcare field with an Associate degree will operate in a support role to existing systems and workflows within healthcare informatics settings. Graduates of this program will develop skills leading to positions as Healthcare Informatics Research Assistants and Healthcare Systems Analysts.


Healthcare Informatics Student Spotlight

Introduction

Healthcare Informatics focuses on the management, analysis and reporting of data and information from healthcare systems including hospitals, medical offices, health insurance plans, government healthcare providers and medical research facilities, with the goal of using such data to improve patient care delivery. Students are prepared to turn healthcare data into useful information which will help improve patient care and enhance fiscal and system efficiencies. This is accomplished by creating or implementing databases and other technology systems, recommending informatics solutions, and effectively collecting, storing, and accessing medical data for operational assessment. Students will understand and use data interfaces within healthcare department and providers.

This program is offered as Certificate, Associate in Applied Science and Bachelor of Science options and classes are offered as an evening/weekend format.


BS Baccalaureate Program
Division of Arts, Sciences and Professional Studies | Health Information Management

Contact the Program Director
The Baccalaureate degree program in addition to expanding the curriculum learned within the Associate degree program in healthcare informatics and liberal arts will teach management and organizational skills leading graduates to positions as Decision Support Managers, Project Managers, Project Designers, and/or Research Managers.

Clinical Practicum (Internship)

Students in the certificate and bachelor’s program have the option to apply and integrate the knowledge and skills acquired throughout the program in an offsite healthcare informatics setting. This non-paid internship is typically offered during the day, during regular business hours. Every effort is made to accommodate students’ work schedules so they will be able to complete the required hours. Transportation, parking and other costs related to the practicum site is the responsibility of the student.

Graduates may apply to write the national certification examinations* for Certified Health Informatics Systems Professional (CHISP) administered by American Society of Health Informatics Managers (ASHIM); ); Certified Associate in Healthcare Information and Management Systems (CAHIMS) and Certified Professional in Healthcare Information and Management Systems (CPHIMS) administered by Healthcare Information Management Systems Society (Himss); and Certified Professional in Health Informatics (CPHI™) administered by the American Health Information Management Association (AHIMA).

*Certification requirements may include certain professional years of experience to sit for exam.

Resources
Program Requirements
Admissions Requirements:
  • High school or college-level biology and algebra.
  • A 2.0 GPA is required for transfer credit.
Minimum Degree Requirements:

Program Format:

Time of Program: Evening/Weekends

Mode of Delivery: On-site seated

Normal Time to Completion: 12 months

Minimum Certificate Requirements:

A total of 35 semester hours with a Quality Point Average of 2.0.

Program Requirements*

BU300, HCI101, HCI102, HCI210, HCI300, HCI330, HCI400, HCI410, HIT104, HIT208, DA103, MA455

* A minimum grade of “C” (2.0) is required.

A total of 15 credits (no more than 50%) can be transferred into the program through college study or work experience in the fields of computer science, engineering, business or healthcare. These credits may be earned through the College Level Examination program (CLEP), Excelsior Exams and/or DANTES College Examinations (DSST). A student cannot duplicate earned credit through an exam. In sequential courses a student who has taken a higher level course cannot earn credit by taking an exam for a lower level course.

Graduation Requirements:
Courses
  • Semester 1
    17
    Project Management
    3

    This course covers general project management concepts, tools, and techniques.  A popular project management software package is used to practice the techniques.

    Healthcare Systems and Operations
    3

    This introductory course provides an overview of the health professions and U.S. healthcare delivery system. This course explores the historical perspective and current trends in today’s healthcare environment. Topics include healthcare organization and delivery, regulations, finance and reimbursement, managed care, quality and cost, government oversight agencies, the electronic health record (EHR), data exchange, and emerging trends in healthcare. One area of focus will be on the hospital setting with an in-depth evaluation of its different departments, operations, finance, technologies and services rendered to patients.

     

    Introduction to Healthcare Informatics
    3

    This is an introductory course for students that cover the history of the rapidly evolving discipline of healthcare informatics. Students will explore critical issues and challenges facing informatics professionals today along with an overview of new information technology applications and how they have improved the management and delivery of healthcare. Topics include HIPAA and other legislation, application of electronic health records, and other clinical and administrative applications of health information systems.

    Healthcare Informatics Data Standards
    3

    This course examines the importance of consistency in health data, the current data standards, future federal initiatives and standards lead organizations are using. An evaluation of ontology, acronyms, coding and classifications systems utilized in health information technology will be evaluated from the perspective of the users of the systems and by those who design and maintain those systems. Various statistical and data analysis software applications will be utilized.

     

    Legal Aspects of Health Information
    3

    Students become familiar with the health record as a legal document, the role of the Health Information department in legal proceedings, laws pertaining to the release of information, security and confidentiality of health records. The course includes a study of the U.S. court system. Bio ethical issues which supplement the course in ethics in health care are presented for discussion. (Spring Semester)

    Quality Assurance and Improvement
    2

    This course introduces students to the areas of a Quality Management (QA). Other highlights of this course include projects where students apply the tools for identifying and displaying health care data and utilize quality improvement tools. (Fall and Spring Semesters)

  • Semester 2
    18
    Business Systems Analysis and Design in Healthcare
    3

    This course promotes the conceptual and skill based learning needed to understand the process of analyzing and designing information systems. The course focuses on the analysis involved in the systems development process and the steps involved in understanding and modeling the user needs in an information system solution. The course will touch on project planning and management aspects and the design of computer programs in order to provide an overview of the whole information system development process. Development of architectural diagrams/design will be explored.

    Clinical Decision Support Systems
    3

    This course discusses the significant role clinical decision support systems play in the field of clinical knowledge management technologies. The topic will take a deep dive into their capacity to support the clinical process and use of knowledge, from diagnosis and investigation through treatment and long-term care. Other topics include data strategies and analytics. Various statistical and data analysis software applications will be utilized.

     

    Database Healthcare Management Systems
    3

    This course will introduce fundamental database concepts used to develop and implement database systems, the relational model along with the use of structured query language (SQL). Principles of good database design to achieve the expected outcome/output will be used to illustrate the construction of databases, as well as evaluating implementation methods and approaches. Various statistical and data analysis software applications will be utilized.

     

    Healthcare Informatics Practicum
    3

    This course provides students an opportunity to apply and integrate knowledge and skills acquired throughout the program in an offsite Healthcare Informatics setting and/or a simulated EHR environment. Students will participate in hands-on activities and real world exercises.

     

    SQL for Data Analysis
    3
    Quantitative Research Methods
    3

    This hands-on research methods course introduces students to a variety of quantitative methods to investigate research questions. Students will collect data, and using statistics software students will analyze and interpret data and then present the findings in formal reports. Through the experience of investigation, students will develop quantitative research, statistical analysis, and report-writing skills. (Spring Semester)

Resources
Program Requirements
Admission Requirements:
  • High school diploma with a minimum overall average of 80% or a GED with a score of 2625.
  • High school courses in biology and algebra. Those lacking one or more of the high school courses must take a college equivalent course and receive a grade of at least 2.0. These courses must be taken prior to the start of the first semester or within the first semester of study.
  • A 2.0 GPA is required for transfer credit.
Minimum Degree Requirements:

Program Format:

Time of Program: Evening/Weekends

Mode of Delivery: On-site seated

Normal Time to Completion: 24 months

Minimum Degree Requirements:

A total of at least 65 semester hours with a Quality Point Average of 2.0.

General Education Core Requirements:

Basic Communications (7 credits): EN101, EN200, and GS100* or GS102*

Humanities (3 credits) PH205

Natural Science (4 credits): BIO109/BIO109L*

Quantitative Analysis (6 credits): MA107*, MA120*

Social Science (6 credits): EC202 and PSY101

Program Requirements*

BU106, BU132, CNA105, HCI101, HCI102, HCI210, HIT103, HIT104, HIT201, HIT202, HIT208, HIT218, MB119

* A minimum grade of “C” (2.0) is required.

Up to 15 credits can be transferred into the program for the academic core courses and 15 credits for General Education courses. Candidates who have work experience in the fields of computer science, engineering, business or healthcare may qualify for course credit.

A student may earn up to 15 credits through the college level examination program (CLEP), Excelsior Exams and DSST exams. A student cannot duplicate earned credit through an exam. In sequential courses a student who has taken a higher level course cannot earn credit by taking an exam for a lower level course.

Graduation Requirements:

 

 

Courses
  • Semester 1
    17/19
    Information Technology I
    3

    This course includes practical applications of microcomputers through the use of software packages. Topics include an overview of microcomputer hardware and the operating system, an overview of application software including expected features, comparative analysis and integration. Hands-on experience in the use of the operating system, a major spreadsheet package, a major word processing package, and a major database package. (Fall and Spring Semesters)

    Introduction to Computer Networking
    4

    This course provides the introduction to the field of computer networking. Topics include: standards, protocols, media, hardware devices, network operating systems, security, and troubleshooting. Hands-on activities include: creating network cabling configurations, building network configuration, and working with network hardware components such as: hubs, switches, routers, firewalls, and wireless equipment. (Fall Semester)

    English Composition
    3

    The course seeks to aid the communication process by developing the ability to write clear, concise, expository prose, with emphasis on pre-writing and revision. It assists the student in finding a voice and an audience. A research paper is required, thus techniques of writing a formal research paper are reviewed. (Fall, Spring and Summer Semesters)

    College Seminar*
    1

    The College Seminar is a course designed to provide students strategies for successful learning in college and beyond. Topics in the course include: learning styles, learning and study strategies, cognitive strategies, time management, goal-setting, note-taking, test-taking strategies, overcoming test anxiety, cultural diversity, and other issues that focus on enabling students to become better achievers.

    The course is one credit with a one hour laboratory. Students are requires to take this course in their first semester at Trocaire College. (Fall, Spring and Summer Semester)

    *Students must receive a grade of “C” (2.0) or higher to pass this course.

    OR
    College Success*
    3

    The College Success is a course designed to provide students strategies for successful learning in college and beyond. It is part of the Transitional Studies curriculum. Central to the course is students’ intensive work in learning strategies and the use of the diagnostic tool, Learning and Study Strategies Inventory (LASSI). Topics in the course include: learning styles, learning and study strategies, cognitive strategies, time management, goal-setting, note-taking, test-taking strategies, overcoming test anxiety, cultural diversity, and other issues that focus on enabling students to become better achievers.

    This course is three credits and is open only to new Trocaire students who participate in Transitional Studies. They are required to take this course their first semester at Trocaire College. (Fall and Spring Semesters)

    *Placement is based on participation in Transitional Studies

    *Students must receive a grade of “C” (2.0) or higher to pass this course.

    Introduction to Healthcare Informatics
    3

    This is an introductory course for students that cover the history of the rapidly evolving discipline of healthcare informatics. Students will explore critical issues and challenges facing informatics professionals today along with an overview of new information technology applications and how they have improved the management and delivery of healthcare. Topics include HIPAA and other legislation, application of electronic health records, and other clinical and administrative applications of health information systems.

    Medical Terminology
    3

    This course is a study of the language of medicine as it relates to all body systems.  Emphasis is placed on the understanding of word roots, prefixes, suffixes and abbreviations.  Terminology related to anatomy, physiology, laboratory, clinical procedures and pharmacology will be covered.  Pronunciation and spelling will be emphasized.  (Fall and Spring Semesters)

  • Semester 2
    19
    Essentials of Anatomy and Physiology
    3

    A one semester course designed for the allied health careers. It gives an introductory treatment of the structure and function of the human body including cell, skeletal, muscular, nervous, endocrine, respiratory, cardiovascular, digestive, urinary and reproductive systems. Three lecture hours.

    Essentials of Anatomy and Physiology Laboratory
    1

    Laboratory experience coincides with lecture topics. Two laboratory hours.

    Business Communications I
    3

    Principles and mechanics of effective written and oral communication will be studied in relationship to work and the process using electronic technology and working with teams. International communication will be introduced and studies of listening skills as well as the writing process will be explored. Review of basic English grammar emphasizing principles of punctuation, capitalization, sentence structure, and vocabulary; organizing, developing, and stylization of letters, memorandum, email, and reports will be stressed. Human relations in business writing and oral reporting will be covered. (Fall and Spring Semesters)

    Healthcare Systems and Operations
    3

    This introductory course provides an overview of the health professions and U.S. healthcare delivery system. This course explores the historical perspective and current trends in today’s healthcare environment. Topics include healthcare organization and delivery, regulations, finance and reimbursement, managed care, quality and cost, government oversight agencies, the electronic health record (EHR), data exchange, and emerging trends in healthcare. One area of focus will be on the hospital setting with an in-depth evaluation of its different departments, operations, finance, technologies and services rendered to patients.

     

    Health Information Systems
    3

    Student learn to utilize software application in the healthcare industry and specific to the health information department of a healthcare facility. Hardware and software systems, databases, and electronic health records will be included. Overview of selection and development of a system, data quality, security control, confidentiality, and report management will be emphasized. (Fall Semester)

    Legal Aspects of Health Information
    3

    Students become familiar with the health record as a legal document, the role of the Health Information department in legal proceedings, laws pertaining to the release of information, security and confidentiality of health records. The course includes a study of the U.S. court system. Bio ethical issues which supplement the course in ethics in health care are presented for discussion. (Spring Semester)

    Logical Reasoning and Decision Making
    3

    This course introduces students to both informal and formal logic; and students will use the developed logic to evaluate decisions for given situations. Topics include: informal logical games, logical fallacies, truth tables, logical equivalence, sentential logic with proofs, categorical logic, probability, expected value, and decision making. (This course is cross listed in Philosophy PH107-credit will not be granted for both PH107 and MA107)

  • Semester 3
    15
    Advanced Composition
    3

    The course develops critical thinking, reading, and writing skills as they apply to the analysis of primary and secondary non-fiction books, articles, and essays from a range of academic and cultural contexts. The course emphasizes the techniques and principles of effective research-bases writing.

    Health Statistics and Data Analytics
    3

    This course introduces students to a study of methods for compiling statistics for healthcare administration, medical staff and licensing and accrediting agencies. Vital statistics, public health statistics and hospital statistics are covered. An introduction to data analytics, data mining, decision support and common healthcare research techniques with graphic presentation of data is also covered.

     

    Healthcare Reimbursement
    3

    This course covers the principles of healthcare reimbursement. Students will learn how reimbursement systems affect healthcare organizations, providers, consumers and payers. Topics include the development of classification and information technology systems, managed care and government-sponsored healthcare programs, reimbursement methodologies, current healthcare regulations, compliance and revenue cycle management.

     

    Statistics I
    3

    An introduction to Statistics with modern applications to Sociology, Business, Economics, Ecology, Health Science and Psychology. Topics include: descriptive statistics, central tendency, percentile rank, Z-Scores, probability, probability distribution, correlation and regression analysis. (Fall and Spring Semesters)

    General Psychology
    3

    An introduction to the basic concepts, research methods and applications of psychology. The major theoretical perspectives are presented through such areas as sensation, perception, intelligence, cognition, personality, and abnormal behavior. The course requires a research paper. (Fall, Spring and Summer Semesters)

  • Semester 4
    13
    Principles of Microeconomics
    3

    This course offers an explanation of how the market system operates in the context of limited resources. Emphasis is placed on the manner in which individual business firms and consumers determine what to produce, how to produce, and for whom to produce. (Spring Semester)

    Healthcare Informatics Data Standards
    3

    This course examines the importance of consistency in health data, the current data standards, future federal initiatives and standards lead organizations are using. An evaluation of ontology, acronyms, coding and classifications systems utilized in health information technology will be evaluated from the perspective of the users of the systems and by those who design and maintain those systems. Various statistical and data analysis software applications will be utilized.

     

    Management Principles for Health Information
    2

    This course introduces students to supervisory concepts including planning, organizing, controlling, and actuating techniques. Areas of focus will include staffing, communication, productivity, motivation, leadership styles, committee activities, and the role and the functions of the Health Information management team. This course also introduces students to quality management, utilization review, and risk management. (Spring Semester)

    Quality Assurance and Improvement
    2

    This course introduces students to the areas of a Quality Management (QA). Other highlights of this course include projects where students apply the tools for identifying and displaying health care data and utilize quality improvement tools. (Fall and Spring Semesters)

    Ethics in Health Care
    3

    Modern medicine and health care have created new human ethical problems. This course will explore a number of medical ethical dilemmas, such as end-of-life decisions, defining the concept of death, ordinary versus extraordinary means of treatment, reproductive issues, informed consent, confidentiality, truth-telling, withholding treatment, and the distribution of scarce medical resources, in the light of the principles of autonomy, non-maleficence, beneficence, and justice. One semester of clinical experience is strongly recommended. (Fall, Spring and Summer Semesters)

Resources
Program Requirements
Admission Requirements:
  • High school diploma with a minimum overall average of 80% or a GED with a score of 2625.
  • High school courses in biology and algebra. Those lacking one or more of the high school courses must take a college equivalent course and receive a grade of “C” (2.0) or better. These courses must be taken prior to the start of the first semester or within the first semester of study.
  • A 2.0 GPA is required for transfer credit.
  • A student cannot duplicate earned credit through an exam. In sequential courses, a student who had taken a higher lever course cannot earn credit by taking an exam for a lower level course.
Minimum Degree Requirements:

Program Format:

Time of Program: Evening/Weekends

Mode of Delivery: On-site seated

Normal Time to Completion: 48 months

Minimum Degree Requirements:

A total of at least 122 semester hours with a Quality Point Average of 2.0.

General Education Core Requirements:

Basic Communications (7 credits): EN101, EN200, GS100* or GS102*

Humanities (15 credits): Humanities Electives (9 credits), PH205 and PH350

Natural Science (4 credits): BIO109/BIO109L*

Quantitative Analysis (12 credits): MA107*, MA120*, MA220*, MA455*

Social Science (24 credits): EC202, PSY101, PSY320, SOC300 and Social Science Electives (12 credit hours)

Program Requirements*

BU106, BU132, BU300, CNA105, HCI101, HCI102, HCI210, HCI300, HCI320, HCI330, HCI400, HCI410, HIT103, HIT104, HIT201, HIT202, HIT208, HIT218, MB119, DA103

* A minimum grade of “C” (2.0) is required.

Up to 30 credits can be transferred into the program for the academic core courses and 30 credits for General Education courses. Candidates who have work experience in the fields of computer science, engineering, business or healthcare may qualify for course credit.

A student may earn up to 30 credits through the college level examination program (CLEP), Excelsior Exams and DSST exams. A student cannot duplicate

Graduation Requirements:
Courses
  • Semester 1
    17/19
    Information Technology I
    3

    This course includes practical applications of microcomputers through the use of software packages. Topics include an overview of microcomputer hardware and the operating system, an overview of application software including expected features, comparative analysis and integration. Hands-on experience in the use of the operating system, a major spreadsheet package, a major word processing package, and a major database package. (Fall and Spring Semesters)

    Introduction to Computer Networking
    4

    This course provides the introduction to the field of computer networking. Topics include: standards, protocols, media, hardware devices, network operating systems, security, and troubleshooting. Hands-on activities include: creating network cabling configurations, building network configuration, and working with network hardware components such as: hubs, switches, routers, firewalls, and wireless equipment. (Fall Semester)

    English Composition
    3

    The course seeks to aid the communication process by developing the ability to write clear, concise, expository prose, with emphasis on pre-writing and revision. It assists the student in finding a voice and an audience. A research paper is required, thus techniques of writing a formal research paper are reviewed. (Fall, Spring and Summer Semesters)

    College Seminar*
    1

    The College Seminar is a course designed to provide students strategies for successful learning in college and beyond. Topics in the course include: learning styles, learning and study strategies, cognitive strategies, time management, goal-setting, note-taking, test-taking strategies, overcoming test anxiety, cultural diversity, and other issues that focus on enabling students to become better achievers.

    The course is one credit with a one hour laboratory. Students are requires to take this course in their first semester at Trocaire College. (Fall, Spring and Summer Semester)

    *Students must receive a grade of “C” (2.0) or higher to pass this course.

    OR
    College Success*
    3

    The College Success is a course designed to provide students strategies for successful learning in college and beyond. It is part of the Transitional Studies curriculum. Central to the course is students’ intensive work in learning strategies and the use of the diagnostic tool, Learning and Study Strategies Inventory (LASSI). Topics in the course include: learning styles, learning and study strategies, cognitive strategies, time management, goal-setting, note-taking, test-taking strategies, overcoming test anxiety, cultural diversity, and other issues that focus on enabling students to become better achievers.

    This course is three credits and is open only to new Trocaire students who participate in Transitional Studies. They are required to take this course their first semester at Trocaire College. (Fall and Spring Semesters)

    *Placement is based on participation in Transitional Studies

    *Students must receive a grade of “C” (2.0) or higher to pass this course.

    Introduction to Healthcare Informatics
    3

    This is an introductory course for students that cover the history of the rapidly evolving discipline of healthcare informatics. Students will explore critical issues and challenges facing informatics professionals today along with an overview of new information technology applications and how they have improved the management and delivery of healthcare. Topics include HIPAA and other legislation, application of electronic health records, and other clinical and administrative applications of health information systems.

    Medical Terminology
    3

    This course is a study of the language of medicine as it relates to all body systems.  Emphasis is placed on the understanding of word roots, prefixes, suffixes and abbreviations.  Terminology related to anatomy, physiology, laboratory, clinical procedures and pharmacology will be covered.  Pronunciation and spelling will be emphasized.  (Fall and Spring Semesters)

  • Semester 2
    19
    Essentials of Anatomy and Physiology
    3

    A one semester course designed for the allied health careers. It gives an introductory treatment of the structure and function of the human body including cell, skeletal, muscular, nervous, endocrine, respiratory, cardiovascular, digestive, urinary and reproductive systems. Three lecture hours.

    Essentials of Anatomy and Physiology Laboratory
    1

    Laboratory experience coincides with lecture topics. Two laboratory hours.

    Business Communications I
    3

    Principles and mechanics of effective written and oral communication will be studied in relationship to work and the process using electronic technology and working with teams. International communication will be introduced and studies of listening skills as well as the writing process will be explored. Review of basic English grammar emphasizing principles of punctuation, capitalization, sentence structure, and vocabulary; organizing, developing, and stylization of letters, memorandum, email, and reports will be stressed. Human relations in business writing and oral reporting will be covered. (Fall and Spring Semesters)

    Healthcare Systems and Operations
    3

    This introductory course provides an overview of the health professions and U.S. healthcare delivery system. This course explores the historical perspective and current trends in today’s healthcare environment. Topics include healthcare organization and delivery, regulations, finance and reimbursement, managed care, quality and cost, government oversight agencies, the electronic health record (EHR), data exchange, and emerging trends in healthcare. One area of focus will be on the hospital setting with an in-depth evaluation of its different departments, operations, finance, technologies and services rendered to patients.

     

    Health Information Systems
    3

    Student learn to utilize software application in the healthcare industry and specific to the health information department of a healthcare facility. Hardware and software systems, databases, and electronic health records will be included. Overview of selection and development of a system, data quality, security control, confidentiality, and report management will be emphasized. (Fall Semester)

    Legal Aspects of Health Information
    3

    Students become familiar with the health record as a legal document, the role of the Health Information department in legal proceedings, laws pertaining to the release of information, security and confidentiality of health records. The course includes a study of the U.S. court system. Bio ethical issues which supplement the course in ethics in health care are presented for discussion. (Spring Semester)

    Logical Reasoning and Decision Making
    3

    This course introduces students to both informal and formal logic; and students will use the developed logic to evaluate decisions for given situations. Topics include: informal logical games, logical fallacies, truth tables, logical equivalence, sentential logic with proofs, categorical logic, probability, expected value, and decision making. (This course is cross listed in Philosophy PH107-credit will not be granted for both PH107 and MA107)

  • Semester 3
    15
    Advanced Composition
    3

    The course develops critical thinking, reading, and writing skills as they apply to the analysis of primary and secondary non-fiction books, articles, and essays from a range of academic and cultural contexts. The course emphasizes the techniques and principles of effective research-bases writing.

    Health Statistics and Data Analytics
    3

    This course introduces students to a study of methods for compiling statistics for healthcare administration, medical staff and licensing and accrediting agencies. Vital statistics, public health statistics and hospital statistics are covered. An introduction to data analytics, data mining, decision support and common healthcare research techniques with graphic presentation of data is also covered.

     

    Healthcare Reimbursement
    3

    This course covers the principles of healthcare reimbursement. Students will learn how reimbursement systems affect healthcare organizations, providers, consumers and payers. Topics include the development of classification and information technology systems, managed care and government-sponsored healthcare programs, reimbursement methodologies, current healthcare regulations, compliance and revenue cycle management.

     

    Statistics I
    3

    An introduction to Statistics with modern applications to Sociology, Business, Economics, Ecology, Health Science and Psychology. Topics include: descriptive statistics, central tendency, percentile rank, Z-Scores, probability, probability distribution, correlation and regression analysis. (Fall and Spring Semesters)

    General Psychology
    3

    An introduction to the basic concepts, research methods and applications of psychology. The major theoretical perspectives are presented through such areas as sensation, perception, intelligence, cognition, personality, and abnormal behavior. The course requires a research paper. (Fall, Spring and Summer Semesters)

  • Semester 4
    14
    Principles of Microeconomics
    3

    This course offers an explanation of how the market system operates in the context of limited resources. Emphasis is placed on the manner in which individual business firms and consumers determine what to produce, how to produce, and for whom to produce. (Spring Semester)

    Healthcare Informatics Data Standards
    3

    This course examines the importance of consistency in health data, the current data standards, future federal initiatives and standards lead organizations are using. An evaluation of ontology, acronyms, coding and classifications systems utilized in health information technology will be evaluated from the perspective of the users of the systems and by those who design and maintain those systems. Various statistical and data analysis software applications will be utilized.

     

    Management Principles for Health Professionals
    3

    This course introduces students to supervisory concepts including planning, organizing, controlling, and budgeting techniques in a healthcare setting. Areas of focus will include staffing, communication, productivity, motivation, leadership styles, committee activities, teamwork and organizational culture. This course also introduces students to quality management, utilization review, and risk management.

     

    Quality Assurance and Improvement
    2

    This course introduces students to the areas of a Quality Management (QA). Other highlights of this course include projects where students apply the tools for identifying and displaying health care data and utilize quality improvement tools. (Fall and Spring Semesters)

    Ethics in Health Care
    3

    Modern medicine and health care have created new human ethical problems. This course will explore a number of medical ethical dilemmas, such as end-of-life decisions, defining the concept of death, ordinary versus extraordinary means of treatment, reproductive issues, informed consent, confidentiality, truth-telling, withholding treatment, and the distribution of scarce medical resources, in the light of the principles of autonomy, non-maleficence, beneficence, and justice. One semester of clinical experience is strongly recommended. (Fall, Spring and Summer Semesters)

  • Semester 5
    15
    Project Management
    3

    This course covers general project management concepts, tools, and techniques.  A popular project management software package is used to practice the techniques.

    Statistics II
    3

    This course continues the study of Statistics and takes up normal distribution, linear regression, sampling techniques and hypothesis testing, as well as analysis of variance and non-parametric statistics.

    Business Systems Analysis and Design in Healthcare
    3

    This course promotes the conceptual and skill based learning needed to understand the process of analyzing and designing information systems. The course focuses on the analysis involved in the systems development process and the steps involved in understanding and modeling the user needs in an information system solution. The course will touch on project planning and management aspects and the design of computer programs in order to provide an overview of the whole information system development process. Development of architectural diagrams/design will be explored.

    Humanities Elective
    3
    Social Science Elective
    3
  • Semester 6
    15
    Healthcare Leadership and Change Management
    3

    This course addresses the role of the informatics professional in helping an organization embrace change. The course will focus on the struggle between administration, and clinicians to identify the best solutions that will support the unique structures within healthcare organizations and the behaviors within these organizations that impact decision making. Challenges and solutions will be evaluated from a macro (organization-wide) perspective and micro (specialty and individual level) perspective, with emphasis on aligning work to be carried out against organizational values, mission and vision and gaining consensus that a selected solution will effectively deliver services within an organization.

    Clinical Decision Support Systems
    3

    This course discusses the significant role clinical decision support systems play in the field of clinical knowledge management technologies. The topic will take a deep dive into their capacity to support the clinical process and use of knowledge, from diagnosis and investigation through treatment and long-term care. Other topics include data strategies and analytics. Various statistical and data analysis software applications will be utilized.

     

    Research Methods: Techniques and Designs
    3

    Provides students with an introduction to research methods in the Behavioral Sciences. The assumptions and goals of the scientific method will be considered and various types of research techniques and designs will be studied. Students will learn the process of writing a research proposal and explore the ethics of research with human and animal subjects.

    Humanities Elective
    3
    Social Science Elective
    3
  • Semester 7
    15
    Database Healthcare Management Systems
    3

    This course will introduce fundamental database concepts used to develop and implement database systems, the relational model along with the use of structured query language (SQL). Principles of good database design to achieve the expected outcome/output will be used to illustrate the construction of databases, as well as evaluating implementation methods and approaches. Various statistical and data analysis software applications will be utilized.

     

    Quantitative Research Methods
    3

    This hands-on research methods course introduces students to a variety of quantitative methods to investigate research questions. Students will collect data, and using statistics software students will analyze and interpret data and then present the findings in formal reports. Through the experience of investigation, students will develop quantitative research, statistical analysis, and report-writing skills. (Spring Semester)

    Epidemiology
    3

    An introduction to epidemiology, this course covers the principles and methods of epidemiologic investigation including describing the patterns of illness in populations and research designs for investigating the etiology of disease. The course introduces quantitative measures to determine risk, association and procedures for standardization of rates.

    Cross listed with BIO300. Credit will not be granted for both SOC300 and BIO300. 

    Humanities Elective
    3
    Social Science Elective
    3
  • Semester 8
    12
    Healthcare Informatics Practicum
    3

    This course provides students an opportunity to apply and integrate knowledge and skills acquired throughout the program in an offsite Healthcare Informatics setting and/or a simulated EHR environment. Students will participate in hands-on activities and real world exercises.

     

    SQL for Data Analysis
    3
    Topics in Bioethics
    3

    This course will introduce students to various topics of the instructor’s choosing in the areas of Bioethics.  Bioethics can be seen as a branch of ethics, or more specifically, a branch of applied ethics.  In many ways bioethical disclosure presupposes ethical disclosure.  For this reason students will be introduced to an array of normative ethical theories and principles before embarking on a range of bioethical dilemma cases and topic areas.  The interdisciplinary nature of Bioethics also demands that students be introduced to the latest medical and scientific breakthroughs in areas such as stem cell research, cloning, regenerative medicine, and genetic screening.  The course will guide students through a wide range of bioethical issues which may include topics like abortion, euthanasia, embryonia stem cell research, cloning, scarce medical resources, and assisted reproduction.  Students will be expected to carry out their own original research in the arena of bioethics and will be asked to write a longer argumentive style essay in order to complete the course.

    Social Science Elective
    3