Veterinary Technology

Trocaire Vet Techs examining a feline subject.

AAS Associate Program – In-Person Pathway
Division of Veterinary Sciences  | Veterinary Technology

Our Veterinary Technology program provides you with the ultimate flexibility to fit your preferred mode of learning.  Enroll in either our in-person or online pathway and get ready to begin your veterinary technician career.  Veterinary technicians leverage their skills, education, and love of animals to assist veterinarians as they provide medical care for creatures both great and small. Beyond private veterinary clinics, the veterinary profession has opportunities to work with animals in specialty hospitals, rehabilitation centers, zoos, aviaries, aquariums, farms, and research laboratories.

Veterinary Technicians must possess a wide range of skills, as they perform a multitude of tasks, including surgical preparation, anesthesia monitoring, medical equipment sterilization, radiographic procedures, diagnostic testing, medication administration, client communication and much more.

Veterinary Technicians should be highly motivated critical thinkers, who are passionate about animals, as well as have the ability to integrate and prioritize a variety of activities. Veterinary technicians have a professional role assisting veterinarians, working with veterinary staff, and providing treatment to animals, all of which provide the framework for Trocaire’s AAS in Veterinary Technology program.

During the first semester, students will complete 40 hours working with animals in a relevant veterinary setting with veterinarians and veterinary technicians (small or large animal veterinary practice/hospital/clinic, animal shelter, research facility or zoo) to gain valuable insight into the profession. As students progress through the curriculum, their learning will be a balance of classroom learning, clinical experiences, and hands-on labs in veterinary facilities or our brand-new state-of-the-art teaching facility.

Students must choose a pathway when beginning the program and can only take up to 20% of vet tech program credit hours in the opposite pathway. 

Put your love of animals to work for you with Trocaire’s Veterinary Technician program.

Our Traditional In-Person pathway is for students who:

  • Are SELF DIRECTED, SELF MOTIVATED, and SELF DISCIPLINED
  • Prefer to take classes in traditional undergraduate setting
  • Manage time effectively possesses good study skills
  • Are self-learners/discoverers
  • Have good critical thinking skills
  • Can attend all required classes and laboratory sessions
  • Have an understanding of the profession and its requirements
  • Work cooperatively and productively with others
  • Have a desire to work with small, exotic and large animals to achieve degree requirements
  • Have compassion for animals and empathy for people

Program Format
Time of Program: Day
Mode of Delivery: In-person, 15 week terms, 80% of vet tech course work must be completed in-person
Normal Time to Completion: 24 months (two academic years)
Clinical Experience hours: Minimum of 234 hours required as part of the curriculum
Laboratory Courses: Completed in small animal, large animal and clinical technique labs

Trocaire College is awaiting final approval for the licensure-qualifying Veterinary Technology Program from the New York State Department of Education which is anticipated in July of 2024. Trocaire College’s application for accreditation by the American Veterinary Medical Association’s (AVMA’s) Committee on Veterinary Education and Activities (CVTEA) has been accepted. An accepted application for accreditation does not guarantee accreditation and applying for accreditation does not grant any temporary status of accreditation.

AAS Associate Program – Online Pathway
Division of Veterinary Sciences  | Veterinary Technology

Our Veterinary Technology program provides you with the ultimate flexibility to fit your preferred mode of learning.  Enroll in either our in-person or online pathway and get ready to begin your veterinary technician career.  Veterinary technicians leverage their skills, education, and love of animals to assist veterinarians as they provide medical care for creatures both great and small. Beyond private veterinary clinics, the veterinary profession has opportunities to work with animals in specialty hospitals, rehabilitation centers, zoos, aviaries, aquariums, farms, and research laboratories.

Veterinary Technicians must possess a wide range of skills, as they perform a multitude of tasks, including surgical preparation, anesthesia monitoring, medical equipment sterilization, radiographic procedures, diagnostic testing, medication administration, client communication and much more.

Veterinary Technicians should be highly motivated critical thinkers, who are passionate about animals, as well as have the ability to integrate and prioritize a variety of activities. Veterinary technicians have a professional role assisting veterinarians, working with veterinary staff, and providing treatment to animals, all of which provide the framework for Trocaire’s AAS in Veterinary Technology program.

During the first semester, students will complete 40 hours working with animals in a relevant veterinary setting with veterinarians and veterinary technicians (small or large animal veterinary practice/hospital/clinic, animal shelter, research facility or zoo) to gain valuable insight into the profession. As students progress through the curriculum, their learning will be a balance of classroom learning, clinical experiences, and hands-on labs in veterinary facilities or our brand-new state-of-the-art teaching facility.

Best for students who are currently working in a veterinary facility. Students enrolled in the online pathway are required to spend at least 10 hours a week in a veterinary setting, starting their second semester. If you are a self-motivated individual with good time management skills, and can spend time in a veterinary facility weekly, the online path may be for you.

Students must choose a pathway when beginning the program and can only take up to 20% of vet tech program credit hours in the opposite pathway. 

Put your love of animals to work for you with Trocaire’s Veterinary Technician program.

Our Online Pathway is for students who:

  • Are SELF DIRECTED, SELF MOTIVATED, and SELF DISCIPLINED
  • Prefer to take classes in a non-traditional setting and are comfortable with computers and technology
  • Currently work in a Veterinary setting
  • Desire to maintain their current residence and employment
  • Manage time effectively and have developed good study skills
  • Are self-learners/discoverers
  • Have good critical thinking skills
  • Have an understanding of the profession and its requirements
  • Work cooperatively and productively with others
  • Can spend at least 10 hours weekly in an approved veterinary setting, starting in their second semester.
  • Are prepared to spend up to 40 hours weekly on coursework.
  • Have a desire to work with small, exotic and large animals to achieve degree requirements
  • Have compassion for animals and empathy for people

Program Format
Time of Program: Online
Mode of Delivery: Online, 15 week terms, 80% of vet tech course work must be completed online
Normal Time to Completion: 24 months (two academic years)
Clinical Experience Hours: Minimum of 234 hours required as part of the curriculum
Laboratory Courses: Completed in small animal, large animal and clinical technique labs.
Additional Clinical Laboratory Hours: Required as part of the online pathway.

Trocaire College is awaiting final approval for the licensure-qualifying Veterinary Technology Program from the New York State Department of Education which is anticipated in July of 2024. Trocaire College’s application for accreditation by the American Veterinary Medical Association’s (AVMA’s) Committee on Veterinary Education and Activities (CVTEA) has been accepted. An accepted application for accreditation does not guarantee accreditation and applying for accreditation does not grant any temporary status of accreditation.

Accreditation Information

Trocaire College is awaiting final approval for the licensure-qualifying Veterinary Technology Program from the New York State Department of Education which is anticipated in July of 2024 and has applied to the American Veterinary Medical Association’s (AVMA’s) Committee on Veterinary Education and Activities (CVTEA) for consideration for initial accreditation. An accepted application for accreditation does not guarantee accreditation and applying for accreditation does not grant any temporary status of accreditation.

Credentialing Requirements
Veterinary Technician credentialing requirements vary in different locations and states. Different states and/ or locations may require you to meet certain licensing, training, exam, criminal background check, and other requirements. You should check with your state, local government, and/or credentialing board to find out the requirements applicable in your state.
https://www.op.nysed.gov/professions/veterinary-technician/license-requirements
https://www.aavsb.org/

Directory of State Boards and Agencies
https://www.aavsb.org/public-resources/find-regulatory-board-information 
https://www.nysavt.org/page/VTNEInfo

Trocaire College is an approved member of the National Council for State Authorization Reciprocity Agreement (NC-SARA) which allows us to provide distance learning programs (both online and in the form of supervised field experiences) and coursework to residents of states other than New York.

All states are participants in the NC-SARA reciprocity agreement except California. Two US Protectorates are also participants in NC-SARA: U.S. Virgin Islands and Puerto Rico. For more information about NC-SARA, visit their website at https://nc-sara.org/

Resources

Trocaire College’s AAS in Veterinary Technology’s mission is to educate students enrolled in the veterinary technician program to be empowered for academic achievement in our field. We support students as they cultivate a successful career that inspires civic engagement that expands beyond their discipline, so students can contribute to the health of our society.

Our dedicated veterinary educators and instructors strive to educate our students to be the most qualified veterinary technicians in the field, providing the highest level, compassionate veterinary nursing care possible.

We have established a diverse set of experiences to enhance students’ education, allowing exposure to the opportunities and the diversity that this profession has to offer. We encourage continuing education and lifelong learning within our field to continually improve on skills and gain new knowledge.

What is a Veterinary Technician?
AVMA(CVTEA) Essential Skills
AAS Veterinary Technician Program Outcomes
AAS Veterinary Technician Program Health Risks and Hazards

Program Requirements
Admission Requirements

Trocaire College evaluates students based on academic metrics, experience and personal attributes, which include:

  • High School Diploma (minimum 75% average) or GED Diploma with a minimum score of 2500
  • Official transcripts from high school and all colleges attended
Pre-entry Requirements
  • Final grade of 85 or higher in Biology and Chemistry (high school or college level)
  • Must meet the minimal technical standards and physical requirements of the veterinary technology profession
  • Must provide proof of rabies pre-exposure vaccination series and a current tetanus inoculation prior to beginning the program

Recommended sources regarding zoonotic disease and rabies prevention:   

Graduation Requirements:
Technical Standards:
Courses
  • Semester 1
    20
    Comparative Anatomy & Physiology I
    3

    This course covers Anatomy and Physiology of Domestic Animals. This is the first in a series of two courses that will explore the organ systems and how they function in healthy animals. The material covered in this first section will introduce anatomical terminology, the structure and function of the integumentary system, skeletal system, muscular system, nervous system and the special senses. These systems will be examined with an emphasis on interrelationships in the body to maintain homeostasis.

    Prerequisites: BIO116 must be taken prior to or concurrently with BIO170.

    Comparative Anatomy & Physiology I Laboratory
    1

    Laboratory experience coincides with lecture topics.

    Prerequisites: BIO116 must be taken prior to or concurrently with BIO170L.

    College Algebra
    3

    A pre-calculus level algebra course. Topics include solving system of equations that contain either two or three variables, adding, subtracting, multiplying and dividing monomials and polynomials; factoring polynomials, simplifying rational expressions and solving linear equations and inequity expressions that contain absolute values.

    Prerequisite: High school Regents mathematics or placement exam score.

    Essentials of Microbiology
    3

    Introduces fundamental concepts of microbiology, classification of microorganisms, their form and function with an emphasis on disease-causing bacteria and viruses. Students will learn how microorganisms contribute to areas of everyday life including medicine, the food industry and biotechnology.

    Prerequisites: BIO116 must be taken prior to or concurrently with BIO170/170L.

    English Composition
    3

    The course seeks to aid the communication process by developing the ability to write clear, concise, expository prose, with emphasis on pre-writing and revision. It assists the student in finding a voice and an audience. A research paper is required, thus techniques of writing a formal research paper are reviewed. (Fall, Spring and Summer Semesters)

    Introduction to Veterinary Technology
    3

    The Veterinary Technology Program acquaints students with a range of concepts and expectations. Participants are introduced to medical terminology, basic scientific principles, and the various career opportunities available to veterinary technicians within animal healthcare. The program provides a comprehensive overview of different breeds of companion and farm animals, while also exploring the general principles of animal behavior, equipment and management, and legal regulations at the county, state, and federal levels. Furthermore, students are given a fundamental understanding of health and disease concepts through preliminary investigation. The program emphasizes the importance of the human-animal bond, underscoring its significance in the field of veterinary medicine.

    College Success*
    3

    The College Success is a course designed to provide students strategies for successful learning in college and beyond. It is part of the Transitional Studies curriculum. Central to the course is students’ intensive work in learning strategies and the use of the diagnostic tool, Learning and Study Strategies Inventory (LASSI). Topics in the course include: learning styles, learning and study strategies, cognitive strategies, time management, goal-setting, note-taking, test-taking strategies, overcoming test anxiety, cultural diversity, and other issues that focus on enabling students to become better achievers.

    This course is three credits and is open only to new Trocaire students who participate in Transitional Studies. They are required to take this course their first semester at Trocaire College. (Fall and Spring Semesters)

    *Placement is based on participation in Transitional Studies

    *Students must receive a grade of “C” (2.0) or higher to pass this course.

    Applied Mathematics for Veterinary Technology
    1

    This course emphasizes the mathematical concepts and skills used in the practice of Veterinary Technology. Topics include dosage calculations, fractions, percentages, percent solutions, fluid therapy and CRI’s, utilizing metric system, dimensional analysis, scientific notation, unit conversions, equations and graphs as they apply to the health sciences. Emphasis will be placed on how these techniques are used in the administration of medications and treatments for patient use.

  • Semester 2
    17
    Comparative Anatomy & Physiology II
    3

    This course covers Anatomy and Physiology of Domestic Animals. This is the second in a series of two courses that will explore the organ systems and how they function in healthy animals. The material covered in this second section will introduce the structure and function of the cardiovascular, lymphatic and immune systems as well as the respiratory, digestive, urinary, endocrine and reproductive systems. These systems will be examined with an emphasis on interrelationships in the body to maintain homeostasis.

    Comparative Anatomy & Physiology II Laboratory
    1

    Laboratory experience coincides with lecture topics.

    Introduction to Laboratory Animal Science
    2

    This course provides comprehensive instruction on the responsible and ethical handling, care, and use of laboratory animals. Topics covered include taxonomy, anatomy, physiology, as well as applicable laws and regulations. In addition, the curriculum explores alternatives to animal research. Note: Registration for the lecture (VET 120), the laboratory/vivarium (VET 120 L) are required.

    Introduction to Laboratory Animal Science Laboratory
    1

    The laboratory component of the course focuses on fundamental techniques for handling, restraining, and performing common procedures on small mammals. Recognition of health and disease through the animal care rotation (vivarium) is an important aspect of this course. Note: The animal care rotation will require additional time besides scheduled class and laboratory hours for vivarium duty.

    Note: Registration for the lecture (VET120), the laboratory (VET120L) are required.

    Parasitology
    2

    This veterinary course studies ectoparasites and endoparasites, including their classification, life cycle, pathogenesis, control, and impact on human health and welfare. Laboratory identification and diagnostic procedures are taught in the lab.

    Note: Must be registered for lecture (VET126) and laboratory (VET126L) in the same semester.

    Parasitology Laboratory
    1

    This veterinary course studies ectoparasites and endoparasites, including identification and diagnostic procedures.

    Note: Must be registered for lecture (VET126) and laboratory (VET126L) in the same semester.

    Pharmacy & Pharmacology for Veterinary Technology
    3

    This course covers the use of drugs in veterinary medicine, including maintenance, dispensing, inventory, drug mechanisms of action, dosages, routes of administration, and toxic effects of veterinary-related drugs. Students practice converting weights and calculating drug doses.

    Prerequisites: MA110, VET116

    Clinical Experience I
    1

    This is the first in a series of three clinical courses. This course will introduce the student to the personnel and operations of a veterinary facility. The student will observe the daily functions including appointments, nursing care, treatment, surgery, and diagnostics including imaging and laboratory procedures. The student will gain a greater understanding of the duties and responsibilities of veterinary technician through the observance of real clinical cases. This course will require a minimum of 70 clinical hours.

    Communication Arts
    3

    An opportunity to develop the art of communicating with ease in business and professional situations. Students will examine the relationship of speaker and audience, noting techniques of effective communication. This course will focus on multicultural verbal and nonverbal skills.

  • Semester 3
    15
    Small Animal Disease & Nutrition
    3

    Proper restraint and care for dogs and cats are covered, including physical and chemical methods. The course also covers common diseases, nutrition for both healthy and ill pets, and procedures for raising orphan puppies and kittens and administering proper vaccinations. Additional student time and assignments may be required outside of scheduled class and laboratory hours.

    Small Animal Disease & Nutrition Laboratory
    1

    Proper restraint and care for dogs and cats are covered, including physical and chemical methods. The course also covers common diseases, nutrition for both healthy and illpets, and procedures for raising orphan puppies and kittens and administering proper vaccinations. Additional student time and assignments may be required outside of scheduled class and laboratory hours.

    Veterinary Clinical Laboratory Techniques
    3

    Proper restraint and care for dogs and cats are covered, including physical and chemical methods. The course also covers common diseases, nutrition for both healthy and ill pets, and procedures for raising orphan puppies and kittens and administering proper vaccinations. Additional student time and assignments may be required outside of scheduled class and laboratory hours.

    Veterinary Clinical Laboratory Techniques Laboratory
    1

    The course will focus on laboratory specimen collection, storage, handling, management procedures, safety, and quality control. It will also emphasize on common analytical procedures used in veterinary medicine for diagnostic and prognostic purposes, such as blood, urine, and feces examination. Additionally, uncommon procedures will be discussed and demonstrated. Must be registered for lecture (VET204) and laboratory (VET204L) in the same semester.

    Veterinary Diagnostic Imaging
    2

    Students will learn about x-ray production theory, the x-ray machine, and how to produce high quality diagnostic images. Students will learn about NYS Radiation Safety regulations, contrast media and special techniques, producing and interpreting electrocardiograms, and using ultrasonography in veterinary medicine. Restricted to VET majors.

    Note: Must be registered for lecture (VET208) and laboratory (VET208L) in the same semester.

    Veterinary Diagnostic Imaging Laboratory
    1

    Students will learn about x-ray production theory and practical aspects of producing diagnostic radiographs. Emphasis will be placed on correcting common problems in technique and positioning to produce high-quality images. NYS radiation safety regulations will be followed. Additionally, students will gain experience with contrast media, special techniques, electrocardiograms (ECG), and ultrasonography in veterinary medicine.

    Dentistry for Veterinary Technicians
    2

    In this comprehensive course on veterinary dentistry, students will learn practical techniques that are essential for recognizing and treating dental problems in animals. The course places a strong emphasis on developing a thorough understanding of dental and paradental anatomy, which is critical for identifying and addressing a wide variety of dental issues. Through a range of clinical applications, students will gain valuable insights into dental pathology, radiology, extractions, and periodontal disease, all of which are key areas of responsibility for veterinary technicians. By the end of this course, students will have acquired a deep and practical knowledge of veterinary dentistry that will serve them well in their future professional endeavors.

    Dentistry for Veterinary Technicians Laboratory
    1

    This veterinary dentistry course teaches practical techniques for recognizing and treating dental problems in animals. Students gain expertise in dental anatomy, radiology, extractions, and periodontal disease, all critical areas for veterinary technicians. By the course end, students have acquired practical knowledge of veterinary dentistry for use in their professional careers. in the same semester.

    Clinical Experience II
    1

    This is the second in a series of three clinical courses. The student will focus in the areas of small animal handling, laboratory procedures, treatment, diagnostic imaging, and dentistry. Students will develop practical skills as they actively participate in the care of actual cases in a clinical setting. This course will require a minimum of 70 clinical hours. The primary objective is to introduce the concepts of veterinary medicine and the duties and responsibilities of a Veterinary Technician by seeing and participating in actual cases. Familiarization with and appreciation for the role of the Veterinary Technician in a practical, applied atmosphere. Throughout the program, all Veterinary Technology students will be required to spend at least 234 hours in a clinical atmosphere to practice hands-on essential skills in their chosen sites. Online students are required to spend additional hours in a clinical setting throughout their clinical lab courses.

  • Semester 4
    17
    Large Animal Disease & Nutrition
    3

    This course will cover the states of wellness and disease in large animals regarding nutrition, anatomy, physiology, treatment, prevention, and control. It will also explore reproductive physiology and management, herd management, and the husbandry of equine, bovine, porcine, and small ruminants, as well as present common procedures and vaccination protocols for large animals.

    Large Animal Disease & Nutrition Laboratory
    1

    This course will cover the states of wellness and disease in large animals regarding nutrition, anatomy, physiology, treatment, prevention, and control. It will also explore reproductive physiology and management, herd management, and the husbandry of equine, bovine, porcine, and small ruminants, as well as present common procedures and vaccination protocols for large animals. Common procedures and vaccination protocols for large animals will be presented and practiced in the lab.

    Surgical Nursing & Anesthesia
    3

    This course covers surgical theory, pre-operative and post-operative patient care, aseptic technique, sterilization processes, and anesthesiology. Students will also learn about monitoring patients while under anesthesia and will be required to complete assignments outside of class and lab hours.

    Surgical Nursing & Anesthesia Laboratory
    1

    This course covers surgical theory, pre-operative and post-operative care, aseptic technique, surgical instruments, sterilization processes, and anesthesiology with an emphasis on patient monitoring. Students will have additional assignments outside of class hours.

    Exotics & Pathology
    3

    This course introduces students to the handling, husbandry, and diseases of exotic pets such as birds, reptiles, amphibians, and mammals. Additionally, the examination of cells, tissues, organs, and cadavers is essential in veterinary medicine. The course explains the role of necropsy as a learning experience and explores reproductive and diagnostic cytology and histology as well as topics of toxicology and epidemiology.

    Exotics & Pathology Laboratory
    1

    This course introduces students to the handling, husbandry, and diseases of exotic pets such as birds, reptiles, amphibians, and mammals. Additionally, the examination of cells, tissues, organs, and cadavers is essential in veterinary medicine. The course explains the role of necropsy as a learning experience and explores reproductive and diagnostic cytology and histology as well as topics of toxicology and epidemiology.

    Practice Management
    2

    The veterinary hospital is a multifaceted institution, serving both medical and business purposes. One key player in this setting is the veterinary technician, who can perform a pivotal role in ensuring smooth operations. This involves various areas of expertise, such as managing human relations with clients and colleagues, applying basic business principles, maintaining medical records, handling financial transactions, overseeing ordering and inventory, supervising staff, and providing optimal care for animals in the hospital setting. Additionally, the utilization of computerization and its application in the veterinary office is subject to investigation. All of these topics will be covered in this course.

    VTNE Review
    2

    This course is designed to provide a comprehensive review of the program by incorporating hands-on clinical experiences with prior clinical case coursework. The main objective is to assess the proficiency of skills and knowledge obtained from previous courses and clinical experiences by reviewing actual medical situations encountered during clinical rotations. The primary emphasis will be on understanding the role and responsibilities of a licensed Veterinary Technician, with a focus on the Veterinary Technician National Exam (VTNE) domains. The final assessment will be a cumulative exam designed to simulate the VTNE.

    Clinical Experience III
    1

    This is the third and final course in a series of three clinical experiences where observation and performing the tasks of a Veterinary Technician at an animal facility in such areas as surgery, anesthesia, treatment, radiology, laboratory, and general facility operations are continued. The student will focus in the areas of surgical nursing, anesthesia, and emergency medicine. This course will require a minimum of 94 clinical hours. The primary objective is to introduce the concepts of veterinary medicine and the duties and responsibilities of a Veterinary Technician by seeing and participating in actual cases. Familiarization with and appreciation for the role of the Veterinary Technician in a practical, applied atmosphere. Throughout the program, all Veterinary Technology students will be required to spend at least 234 hours in a clinical atmosphere to practice hands-on essential skills in their chosen sites. Online students are required to spend additional hours in a clinical setting throughout their clinical lab courses.

FAQs

The Profession & Nomenclature:

Veterinarian:  A veterinarian is a doctor of veterinary medicine and is a graduate of a 4-year AVMA-accredited veterinary school. Veterinarians must have passed the North American Veterinary Licensing Exam (NAVLE) in order to be eligible for state licensure. To practice veterinary medicine, a veterinarian must pass a licensure exam in the state(s) in which he/she wish to practice. The veterinarian is solely responsible for diagnosing, prognosing, prescribing medication and performing surgery. They are ultimately responsible for all patient care and outcomes.

Veterinary Technologist:  A veterinary technologist is a graduate of a 4-year AVMA-accredited veterinary technology program and has completed a baccalaureate degree in veterinary technology. Veterinary technologists combine veterinary technician duties with hospital and personnel management. They may also be employed as teachers, research associates, sales managers, or clinical technologists in a specialty practice. Licensed veterinary technicians/technologists are prohibited from diagnosing, prescribing medications, prognosing and performing surgery. However, they can assist in surgery under direct supervision of a licensed veterinarian.

Veterinary Technician:  A veterinary technician, in New York, is a graduate of a 2- or 3- year AVMA accredited veterinary technology program who has taken and passed the national and state board exams and is registered with the  New York Veterinary Medical Board, Office of the Professions. The duties performed by a registered veterinary technician include anesthesia, radiology, dental prophylaxis, laboratory techniques, and many clinical procedures. According to the NYS Veterinary Practice Guidelines, a veterinary technician cannot diagnose, prognose, perform surgery, prescribe drugs, or perform procedures that will cause an irreversible change in the animal. This policy is recognized in all 50 states.

Veterinary Assistant:  A veterinary assistant, also known as a veterinary technician assistant, is generally an ‘on-the-job’ trained staff member who performs tasks such as the restraint, feeding, and exercising of animals, cleaning of the veterinary premises, and other clinical support tasks.

The Associate of Applied Science degree area of study in veterinary technology is not intended to meet the requirements for application to veterinary school.

Accreditation Information

Trocaire College is awaiting final approval for the licensure-qualifying Veterinary Technology Program from the New York State Department of Education which is anticipated in July of 2024 and has applied to the American Veterinary Medical Association’s (AVMA’s) Committee on Veterinary Education and Activities (CVTEA) for consideration for initial accreditation. An accepted application for accreditation does not guarantee accreditation and applying for accreditation does not grant any temporary status of accreditation.

Credentialing Requirements
Veterinary Technician credentialing requirements vary in different locations and states. Different states and/ or locations may require you to meet certain licensing, training, exam, criminal background check, and other requirements. You should check with your state, local government, and/or credentialing board to find out the requirements applicable in your state.
https://www.op.nysed.gov/professions/veterinary-technician/license-requirements
https://www.aavsb.org/

Directory of State Boards and Agencies
https://www.aavsb.org/public-resources/find-regulatory-board-information 
https://www.nysavt.org/page/VTNEInfo

Trocaire College is an approved member of the National Council for State Authorization Reciprocity Agreement (NC-SARA) which allows us to provide distance learning programs (both online and in the form of supervised field experiences) and coursework to residents of states other than New York.

All states are participants in the NC-SARA reciprocity agreement except California. Two US Protectorates are also participants in NC-SARA: U.S. Virgin Islands and Puerto Rico. For more information about NC-SARA, visit their website at https://nc-sara.org/

Resources

Trocaire College’s AAS in Veterinary Technology’s mission is to educate students enrolled in the veterinary technician program to be empowered for academic achievement in our field. We support students as they cultivate a successful career that inspires civic engagement that expands beyond their discipline, so students can contribute to the health of our society.

Our dedicated veterinary educators and instructors strive to educate our students to be the most qualified veterinary technicians in the field, providing the highest level, compassionate veterinary nursing care possible.

We have established a diverse set of experiences to enhance students’ education, allowing exposure to the opportunities and the diversity that this profession has to offer. We encourage continuing education and lifelong learning within our field to continually improve on skills and gain new knowledge.

What is a Veterinary Technician?
AVMA(CVTEA) Essential Skills
AAS Veterinary Technician Program Outcomes
AAS Veterinary Technician Program Health Risks and Hazards

Program Requirements
Admission Requirements

Trocaire College evaluates students based on academic metrics, experience and personal attributes, which include:

  • High School Diploma (minimum 75% average) or GED Diploma with a minimum score of 2500
  • Official transcripts from high school and all colleges attended
Pre-entry Requirements
  • Final grade of 85 or higher in Biology and Chemistry (high school or college level)
  • Must meet the minimal technical standards and physical requirements of the veterinary technology profession
  • Must provide proof of rabies pre-exposure vaccination series and a current tetanus inoculation prior to beginning the program

Recommended sources regarding zoonotic disease and rabies prevention:   

 

Graduation Requirements:
Technical Standards:
Courses
  • Semester 1
    20
    Comparative Anatomy & Physiology I
    3

    This course covers Anatomy and Physiology of Domestic Animals. This is the first in a series of two courses that will explore the organ systems and how they function in healthy animals. The material covered in this first section will introduce anatomical terminology, the structure and function of the integumentary system, skeletal system, muscular system, nervous system and the special senses. These systems will be examined with an emphasis on interrelationships in the body to maintain homeostasis.

    Prerequisites: BIO116 must be taken prior to or concurrently with BIO170.

    Comparative Anatomy & Physiology I Laboratory
    1

    Laboratory experience coincides with lecture topics.

    Prerequisites: BIO116 must be taken prior to or concurrently with BIO170L.

    College Algebra
    3

    A pre-calculus level algebra course. Topics include solving system of equations that contain either two or three variables, adding, subtracting, multiplying and dividing monomials and polynomials; factoring polynomials, simplifying rational expressions and solving linear equations and inequity expressions that contain absolute values.

    Prerequisite: High school Regents mathematics or placement exam score.

    Essentials of Microbiology
    3

    Introduces fundamental concepts of microbiology, classification of microorganisms, their form and function with an emphasis on disease-causing bacteria and viruses. Students will learn how microorganisms contribute to areas of everyday life including medicine, the food industry and biotechnology.

    Prerequisites: BIO116 must be taken prior to or concurrently with BIO170/170L.

    English Composition
    3

    The course seeks to aid the communication process by developing the ability to write clear, concise, expository prose, with emphasis on pre-writing and revision. It assists the student in finding a voice and an audience. A research paper is required, thus techniques of writing a formal research paper are reviewed. (Fall, Spring and Summer Semesters)

    Introduction to Veterinary Technology
    3

    The Veterinary Technology Program acquaints students with a range of concepts and expectations. Participants are introduced to medical terminology, basic scientific principles, and the various career opportunities available to veterinary technicians within animal healthcare. The program provides a comprehensive overview of different breeds of companion and farm animals, while also exploring the general principles of animal behavior, equipment and management, and legal regulations at the county, state, and federal levels. Furthermore, students are given a fundamental understanding of health and disease concepts through preliminary investigation. The program emphasizes the importance of the human-animal bond, underscoring its significance in the field of veterinary medicine.

    College Success*
    3

    The College Success is a course designed to provide students strategies for successful learning in college and beyond. It is part of the Transitional Studies curriculum. Central to the course is students’ intensive work in learning strategies and the use of the diagnostic tool, Learning and Study Strategies Inventory (LASSI). Topics in the course include: learning styles, learning and study strategies, cognitive strategies, time management, goal-setting, note-taking, test-taking strategies, overcoming test anxiety, cultural diversity, and other issues that focus on enabling students to become better achievers.

    This course is three credits and is open only to new Trocaire students who participate in Transitional Studies. They are required to take this course their first semester at Trocaire College. (Fall and Spring Semesters)

    *Placement is based on participation in Transitional Studies

    *Students must receive a grade of “C” (2.0) or higher to pass this course.

    Applied Mathematics for Veterinary Technology
    1

    This course emphasizes the mathematical concepts and skills used in the practice of Veterinary Technology. Topics include dosage calculations, fractions, percentages, percent solutions, fluid therapy and CRI’s, utilizing metric system, dimensional analysis, scientific notation, unit conversions, equations and graphs as they apply to the health sciences. Emphasis will be placed on how these techniques are used in the administration of medications and treatments for patient use.

  • Semester 2
    17
    Comparative Anatomy & Physiology II
    3

    This course covers Anatomy and Physiology of Domestic Animals. This is the second in a series of two courses that will explore the organ systems and how they function in healthy animals. The material covered in this second section will introduce the structure and function of the cardiovascular, lymphatic and immune systems as well as the respiratory, digestive, urinary, endocrine and reproductive systems. These systems will be examined with an emphasis on interrelationships in the body to maintain homeostasis.

    Comparative Anatomy & Physiology II Laboratory
    1

    Laboratory experience coincides with lecture topics.

    Introduction to Laboratory Animal Science
    2

    This course provides comprehensive instruction on the responsible and ethical handling, care, and use of laboratory animals. Topics covered include taxonomy, anatomy, physiology, as well as applicable laws and regulations. In addition, the curriculum explores alternatives to animal research. Note: Registration for the lecture (VET 120), the laboratory/vivarium (VET 120 L) are required.

    Introduction to Laboratory Animal Science Laboratory
    1

    The laboratory component of the course focuses on fundamental techniques for handling, restraining, and performing common procedures on small mammals. Recognition of health and disease through the animal care rotation (vivarium) is an important aspect of this course. Note: The animal care rotation will require additional time besides scheduled class and laboratory hours for vivarium duty.

    Note: Registration for the lecture (VET120), the laboratory (VET120L) are required.

    Parasitology
    2

    This veterinary course studies ectoparasites and endoparasites, including their classification, life cycle, pathogenesis, control, and impact on human health and welfare. Laboratory identification and diagnostic procedures are taught in the lab.

    Note: Must be registered for lecture (VET126) and laboratory (VET126L) in the same semester.

    Parasitology Laboratory
    1

    This veterinary course studies ectoparasites and endoparasites, including identification and diagnostic procedures.

    Note: Must be registered for lecture (VET126) and laboratory (VET126L) in the same semester.

    Pharmacy & Pharmacology for Veterinary Technology
    3

    This course covers the use of drugs in veterinary medicine, including maintenance, dispensing, inventory, drug mechanisms of action, dosages, routes of administration, and toxic effects of veterinary-related drugs. Students practice converting weights and calculating drug doses.

    Prerequisites: MA110, VET116

    Clinical Experience I
    1

    This is the first in a series of three clinical courses. This course will introduce the student to the personnel and operations of a veterinary facility. The student will observe the daily functions including appointments, nursing care, treatment, surgery, and diagnostics including imaging and laboratory procedures. The student will gain a greater understanding of the duties and responsibilities of veterinary technician through the observance of real clinical cases. This course will require a minimum of 70 clinical hours.

    Communication Arts
    3

    An opportunity to develop the art of communicating with ease in business and professional situations. Students will examine the relationship of speaker and audience, noting techniques of effective communication. This course will focus on multicultural verbal and nonverbal skills.

  • Semester 3
    15
    Small Animal Disease & Nutrition
    3

    Proper restraint and care for dogs and cats are covered, including physical and chemical methods. The course also covers common diseases, nutrition for both healthy and ill pets, and procedures for raising orphan puppies and kittens and administering proper vaccinations. Additional student time and assignments may be required outside of scheduled class and laboratory hours.

    Small Animal Disease & Nutrition Laboratory
    1

    Proper restraint and care for dogs and cats are covered, including physical and chemical methods. The course also covers common diseases, nutrition for both healthy and illpets, and procedures for raising orphan puppies and kittens and administering proper vaccinations. Additional student time and assignments may be required outside of scheduled class and laboratory hours.

    Veterinary Clinical Laboratory Techniques
    3

    Proper restraint and care for dogs and cats are covered, including physical and chemical methods. The course also covers common diseases, nutrition for both healthy and ill pets, and procedures for raising orphan puppies and kittens and administering proper vaccinations. Additional student time and assignments may be required outside of scheduled class and laboratory hours.

    Veterinary Clinical Laboratory Techniques Laboratory
    1

    The course will focus on laboratory specimen collection, storage, handling, management procedures, safety, and quality control. It will also emphasize on common analytical procedures used in veterinary medicine for diagnostic and prognostic purposes, such as blood, urine, and feces examination. Additionally, uncommon procedures will be discussed and demonstrated. Must be registered for lecture (VET204) and laboratory (VET204L) in the same semester.

    Veterinary Diagnostic Imaging
    2

    Students will learn about x-ray production theory, the x-ray machine, and how to produce high quality diagnostic images. Students will learn about NYS Radiation Safety regulations, contrast media and special techniques, producing and interpreting electrocardiograms, and using ultrasonography in veterinary medicine. Restricted to VET majors.

    Note: Must be registered for lecture (VET208) and laboratory (VET208L) in the same semester.

    Veterinary Diagnostic Imaging Laboratory
    1

    Students will learn about x-ray production theory and practical aspects of producing diagnostic radiographs. Emphasis will be placed on correcting common problems in technique and positioning to produce high-quality images. NYS radiation safety regulations will be followed. Additionally, students will gain experience with contrast media, special techniques, electrocardiograms (ECG), and ultrasonography in veterinary medicine.

    Dentistry for Veterinary Technicians
    2

    In this comprehensive course on veterinary dentistry, students will learn practical techniques that are essential for recognizing and treating dental problems in animals. The course places a strong emphasis on developing a thorough understanding of dental and paradental anatomy, which is critical for identifying and addressing a wide variety of dental issues. Through a range of clinical applications, students will gain valuable insights into dental pathology, radiology, extractions, and periodontal disease, all of which are key areas of responsibility for veterinary technicians. By the end of this course, students will have acquired a deep and practical knowledge of veterinary dentistry that will serve them well in their future professional endeavors.

    Dentistry for Veterinary Technicians Laboratory
    1

    This veterinary dentistry course teaches practical techniques for recognizing and treating dental problems in animals. Students gain expertise in dental anatomy, radiology, extractions, and periodontal disease, all critical areas for veterinary technicians. By the course end, students have acquired practical knowledge of veterinary dentistry for use in their professional careers. in the same semester.

    Clinical Experience II
    1

    This is the second in a series of three clinical courses. The student will focus in the areas of small animal handling, laboratory procedures, treatment, diagnostic imaging, and dentistry. Students will develop practical skills as they actively participate in the care of actual cases in a clinical setting. This course will require a minimum of 70 clinical hours. The primary objective is to introduce the concepts of veterinary medicine and the duties and responsibilities of a Veterinary Technician by seeing and participating in actual cases. Familiarization with and appreciation for the role of the Veterinary Technician in a practical, applied atmosphere. Throughout the program, all Veterinary Technology students will be required to spend at least 234 hours in a clinical atmosphere to practice hands-on essential skills in their chosen sites. Online students are required to spend additional hours in a clinical setting throughout their clinical lab courses.

  • Semester 4
    17
    Large Animal Disease & Nutrition
    3

    This course will cover the states of wellness and disease in large animals regarding nutrition, anatomy, physiology, treatment, prevention, and control. It will also explore reproductive physiology and management, herd management, and the husbandry of equine, bovine, porcine, and small ruminants, as well as present common procedures and vaccination protocols for large animals.

    Large Animal Disease & Nutrition Laboratory
    1

    This course will cover the states of wellness and disease in large animals regarding nutrition, anatomy, physiology, treatment, prevention, and control. It will also explore reproductive physiology and management, herd management, and the husbandry of equine, bovine, porcine, and small ruminants, as well as present common procedures and vaccination protocols for large animals. Common procedures and vaccination protocols for large animals will be presented and practiced in the lab.

    Surgical Nursing & Anesthesia
    3

    This course covers surgical theory, pre-operative and post-operative patient care, aseptic technique, sterilization processes, and anesthesiology. Students will also learn about monitoring patients while under anesthesia and will be required to complete assignments outside of class and lab hours.

    Surgical Nursing & Anesthesia Laboratory
    1

    This course covers surgical theory, pre-operative and post-operative care, aseptic technique, surgical instruments, sterilization processes, and anesthesiology with an emphasis on patient monitoring. Students will have additional assignments outside of class hours.

    Exotics & Pathology
    3

    This course introduces students to the handling, husbandry, and diseases of exotic pets such as birds, reptiles, amphibians, and mammals. Additionally, the examination of cells, tissues, organs, and cadavers is essential in veterinary medicine. The course explains the role of necropsy as a learning experience and explores reproductive and diagnostic cytology and histology as well as topics of toxicology and epidemiology.

    Exotics & Pathology Laboratory
    1

    This course introduces students to the handling, husbandry, and diseases of exotic pets such as birds, reptiles, amphibians, and mammals. Additionally, the examination of cells, tissues, organs, and cadavers is essential in veterinary medicine. The course explains the role of necropsy as a learning experience and explores reproductive and diagnostic cytology and histology as well as topics of toxicology and epidemiology.

    Practice Management
    2

    The veterinary hospital is a multifaceted institution, serving both medical and business purposes. One key player in this setting is the veterinary technician, who can perform a pivotal role in ensuring smooth operations. This involves various areas of expertise, such as managing human relations with clients and colleagues, applying basic business principles, maintaining medical records, handling financial transactions, overseeing ordering and inventory, supervising staff, and providing optimal care for animals in the hospital setting. Additionally, the utilization of computerization and its application in the veterinary office is subject to investigation. All of these topics will be covered in this course.

    VTNE Review
    2

    This course is designed to provide a comprehensive review of the program by incorporating hands-on clinical experiences with prior clinical case coursework. The main objective is to assess the proficiency of skills and knowledge obtained from previous courses and clinical experiences by reviewing actual medical situations encountered during clinical rotations. The primary emphasis will be on understanding the role and responsibilities of a licensed Veterinary Technician, with a focus on the Veterinary Technician National Exam (VTNE) domains. The final assessment will be a cumulative exam designed to simulate the VTNE.

    Clinical Experience III
    1

    This is the third and final course in a series of three clinical experiences where observation and performing the tasks of a Veterinary Technician at an animal facility in such areas as surgery, anesthesia, treatment, radiology, laboratory, and general facility operations are continued. The student will focus in the areas of surgical nursing, anesthesia, and emergency medicine. This course will require a minimum of 94 clinical hours. The primary objective is to introduce the concepts of veterinary medicine and the duties and responsibilities of a Veterinary Technician by seeing and participating in actual cases. Familiarization with and appreciation for the role of the Veterinary Technician in a practical, applied atmosphere. Throughout the program, all Veterinary Technology students will be required to spend at least 234 hours in a clinical atmosphere to practice hands-on essential skills in their chosen sites. Online students are required to spend additional hours in a clinical setting throughout their clinical lab courses.

FAQs

The Profession & Nomenclature:

Veterinarian:  A veterinarian is a doctor of veterinary medicine and is a graduate of a 4-year AVMA-accredited veterinary school. Veterinarians must have passed the North American Veterinary Licensing Exam (NAVLE) in order to be eligible for state licensure. To practice veterinary medicine, a veterinarian must pass a licensure exam in the state(s) in which he/she wish to practice. The veterinarian is solely responsible for diagnosing, prognosing, prescribing medication and performing surgery. They are ultimately responsible for all patient care and outcomes.

Veterinary Technologist:  A veterinary technologist is a graduate of a 4-year AVMA-accredited veterinary technology program and has completed a baccalaureate degree in veterinary technology. Veterinary technologists combine veterinary technician duties with hospital and personnel management. They may also be employed as teachers, research associates, sales managers, or clinical technologists in a specialty practice. Licensed veterinary technicians/technologists are prohibited from diagnosing, prescribing medications, prognosing and performing surgery. However, they can assist in surgery under direct supervision of a licensed veterinarian.

Veterinary Technician:  A veterinary technician, in New York, is a graduate of a 2- or 3- year AVMA accredited veterinary technology program who has taken and passed the national and state board exams and is registered with the  New York Veterinary Medical Board, Office of the Professions. The duties performed by a registered veterinary technician include anesthesia, radiology, dental prophylaxis, laboratory techniques, and many clinical procedures. According to the NYS Veterinary Practice Guidelines, a veterinary technician cannot diagnose, prognose, perform surgery, prescribe drugs, or perform procedures that will cause an irreversible change in the animal. This policy is recognized in all 50 states.

Veterinary Assistant:  A veterinary assistant, also known as a veterinary technician assistant, is generally an ‘on-the-job’ trained staff member who performs tasks such as the restraint, feeding, and exercising of animals, cleaning of the veterinary premises, and other clinical support tasks.

The Associate of Applied Science degree area of study in veterinary technology is not intended to meet the requirements for application to veterinary school.