Radiologic Technology

Trocaire students reviewing medical imaging results.

AAS Associate Program
Division of Allied Health and Professions | Medical Imaging

Radiologic Technology is a dynamic healthcare career in which practitioners use X-rays to produce diagnostic medical images for use in the identifying and treating of injuries and diseases. RTs or rad techs, as they’re often called, use an expert knowledge of the human anatomy, patient positioning, radiation safety and protocol and more to do their jobs and serve their patients on a daily basis.

The mission of Trocaire’s Radiologic Technology Program is to provide students with the theoretical foundation, laboratory skills and clinical experiences that will prepare them for entry-level positions in the field of diagnostic radiologic technology. Our graduates are well equipped to sit for the American Registry of Radiologic Technologists (ARRT) certification exam and are employed all over Western New York in a variety of settings, such as hospitals, ambulatory clinics and orthopedic offices. Graduates can also continue their studies in a bachelor’s degree level program.

Trocaire has several established opportunities for student recognition and career networking including:

  • A Radiologic Technology Club expressly for RT students. The club aims to bring together students to promote personal and professional growth, as well as advocate and support the profession. The club also offers RT scholarship money.
  • Lambda Nu – the National Honor Society for the radiologic and imaging sciences. The Trocaire Chapter, New York Beta, recognizes outstanding students who have demonstrated exemplary scholarship and dedication to their chosen profession.

Applicants to the Radiologic Technology program must be aware that they may be exposed to a Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) environment during any clinical rotation. An MRI environment utilizes strong magnetic fields and radiofrequency waves. If an individual has an MRI contraindicated device or metal implanted in or on their body they should not enter the MRI environment. Additional information regarding MRI safety can be found on the internet and at the following web site: www.mrisafety.com.

AAS Radiologic Technology

Program Format
Time of Program:  Day
Mode of Delivery:  On-site/Seated

PROGRAM-LEVEL – STUDENT LEARNING OUTCOMES
Program Director:  Jaime White, M.Ed., RT(R)(CT)(ARRT)
Date Updated:  November 2020

Program Mission Statement: Grounded in Mercy and service to community, the Radiologic Technology Program at Trocaire College provides students with the theoretical foundation, laboratory skills, and clinical experiences that enable them to become compassionate and competent entry level radiologic technologists.  Adhering to the positive characteristics and ethics of the profession, Trocaire College students graduate with a dedication to self and others, delivering quality care to culturally diverse patients while continually striving to improve their knowledge of the field.  The program embraces the mission and the operating principles of Trocaire College in presenting a comprehensive education to its students.


Accreditation Information

All students completing this program are expected to have achieved the following learning objectives:

OBJECTIVE 1:

At the end of the program, the student will demonstrate entry-level clinical competence.

  • The student will produce diagnostic images
  • The student will identify radiation safety measures
  • The student will utilize appropriate medical terminology

OBJECTIVE 2:

At the end of the program, the student will provide competent and compassionate healthcare to culturally diverse populations.

  • The student will demonstrate oral and written communication skills
  • The student will describe how one’s own culture influences healthcare and perspective

OBJECTIVE 3:

At the end of the program, the student will employ critical thinking and problem-solving skills necessary to practice within the radiology profession.

  • The student will analyze images for diagnostic quality and correct for non-diagnostic appearance
  • The student will revise procedure protocol for non-routine (trauma) procedures

OBJECTIVE 4:

At the end of the program, the student will demonstrate professional behaviors.

  • The student will practice the Code of Ethics as set forth by the ARRT
  • The student will identify key professional organizations
  • The student will understand the need for and create a professional development plan

Trocaire’s Radiologic Technology AAS program is accredited by the Joint Review Committee on Education in Radiologic Technology for a period of five years through 2022.

Joint Review Committee on Education in Radiologic Technology
20 N. Wacker Drive, Suite 2850
Chicago, IL 60606-3182
Phone: (312) 704-5300
Fax: (312) 704-5304
www.jrcert.org

Resources
Program Requirements
Admission Requirements
  • High School Diploma (minimum 85% average) or GED Diploma with a minimum score of 2750.
  • One unit each of high school or college Algebra*, Biology, Chemistry, and Physics
  • Transfer students, 2.75 minimum College cumulative GPA
  • 2.75 cumulative average with minimum grades of “C” in laboratory sciences for current transfer students.
  • Immunizations/physicals:
  • Updated medical records from within one year of the start of the program, and Cardiopulmonary Resuscitation (CPR) certificate are required and are to be submitted prior to attending clinicals.
Minimum Degree Requirements:
  • A total of at least 81 semester hours with a GPA of 2.0. This includes an eight-week summer clinical component following the first year and second years’ course work.
  • General Education:
    • College Seminar (GS100) or College Success (GS102) – minimum C+ grade required
    • Humanities (EN101, EN102)
    • Mathematics (3 credits)
    • Natural Science* (BIO130/130L, BIO131/131L)
    • Philosophy (PH205 and one, 3 credit course)
    • Social Science (PSY101 and one, 3 credit Social Science elective)
  • Program Specific:*
    RT101, RT102/102L, RT103, RT104, RT105, RT106/106L, RT107, RT108, RT109, RT201, RT202, RT203, RT205, RT207, RT210, RT211, RT 212, BIO209
  • Other Requirements:
    BU132

*A minimum grade of “C” (2.0) is required

Graduation Requirements:
Courses
  • Semester 1
    17/19
    Anatomy and Physiology I
    3

    An introduction to the general principles of human anatomy and physiology with emphasis on the structure and function of the cell, tissues, and the skeletal, muscular, cardiovascular, and lymphatic systems. Three lecture hours. (Fall, Spring and Summer Semester)

    Anatomy and Physiology I Laboratory
    1

    Laboratory experience coincides with lecture topics. Two laboratory hours.

    English Composition
    3

    The course seeks to aid the communication process by developing the ability to write clear, concise, expository prose, with emphasis on pre-writing and revision. It assists the student in finding a voice and an audience. A research paper is required, thus techniques of writing a formal research paper are reviewed. (Fall, Spring and Summer Semesters)

    College Seminar*
    1

    The College Seminar is a course designed to provide students strategies for successful learning in college and beyond. Topics in the course include: learning styles, learning and study strategies, cognitive strategies, time management, goal-setting, note-taking, test-taking strategies, overcoming test anxiety, cultural diversity, and other issues that focus on enabling students to become better achievers.

    The course is one credit with a one hour laboratory. Students are requires to take this course in their first semester at Trocaire College. (Fall, Spring and Summer Semester)

    *Students must receive a grade of “C” (2.0) or higher to pass this course.

    OR
    College Success*
    3

    The College Success is a course designed to provide students strategies for successful learning in college and beyond. It is part of the Transitional Studies curriculum. Central to the course is students’ intensive work in learning strategies and the use of the diagnostic tool, Learning and Study Strategies Inventory (LASSI). Topics in the course include: learning styles, learning and study strategies, cognitive strategies, time management, goal-setting, note-taking, test-taking strategies, overcoming test anxiety, cultural diversity, and other issues that focus on enabling students to become better achievers.

    This course is three credits and is open only to new Trocaire students who participate in Transitional Studies. They are required to take this course their first semester at Trocaire College. (Fall and Spring Semesters)

    *Placement is based on participation in Transitional Studies

    *Students must receive a grade of “C” (2.0) or higher to pass this course.

    Image Acquisition and Evaluation I
    3

    This course begins with the basics of conventional film and screens and x-ray tube construction.  Students then examine exposure factors and investigate density/brightness, contrast, geometric blur, beam restriction, grid use and scatter radiation and their effects on image quality.  When appropriate, students work in class on mathematical calculations, study image quality, and take images in the RT laboratory that are used for  evaluation.  (Fall Semester)

    Radiographic Procedures I
    2

    The lecture component of this course begins with an introduction to the specific nomenclature, as well as underlying principles of radiographic positioning. Routine and advanced positioning studies, correlated with anatomy of the upper and lower extremities, chest, abdomen, thorax, and the urinary and digestive systems are presented. (Fall Semester)

    Applied Radiographic Procedures I
    1

    The College Laboratory component of Radiographic Procedures I contains anatomy and positioning applications, as well as film – critique sessions. A competency-based system of evaluation is utilized. (Fall Semester) Two Laboratory Hours.

    Patient Care and Management I
    1

    This course is designed to assist the student to develop both general and specific interactive skills in patient care. It focuses on record maintenance and administrative procedures, ethics and medicolegal issues, patient safety and transfers, vital signs, emergency situations, infection control, oxygen delivery, EKG monitoring, and contrast media. (Fall Semester)

    Clinical Education I
    2

    This course requires practical clinical application of knowledge and skills, and involves clinical experiences in general radiographic areas and contrast studies. It is taken concurrently with the didactic components of the semester, and is provided at the College’s clinical affiliates. A competency – based system of evaluations is utilized. (Fall Semester) Sixteen clinical hours (two days).

  • Semester 2
    19
    Anatomy and Physiology II
    3

    A continuation of Anatomy and Physiology I. Study of the respiratory, nervous, endocrine, digestive, urinary and reproductive systems. Fluid and electrolyte balance also studied. Three lecture hours. (Fall, Spring and Summer)

    Anatomy and Physiology II Laboratory
    1

    Laboratory experience coincides with lecture topics. Two laboratory hours.

    Information Technology I
    3

    This course includes practical applications of microcomputers through the use of software packages. Topics include an overview of microcomputer hardware and the operating system, an overview of application software including expected features, comparative analysis and integration. Hands-on experience in the use of the operating system, a major spreadsheet package, a major word processing package, and a major database package. (Fall and Spring Semesters)

    Literature Elective
    3
    Image Production and Evaluation II
    3

    This course continues instruction on radiographic exposure principles with an emphasis on radiographic techniques, then digital imaging.  Students first learn technique selection and the use of automatic exposure control, anatomically programmed radiography, and technique charts.  Mathematical formulas (algebra level) are utilized for technique compensation.  Computerized radiography (CR) and direct readout (DR) digital radiography are discussed in terms of image receptors, image resolution, and processing. (Spring Semester)

    Radiographic Procedures II
    2

    The lecture component of this course focuses on both routine and advanced positioning studies, correlated with anatomy of the spine, thorax and skull. (Spring Semester)

    Applied Radiographic Procedures II
    1

    The College laboratory component of Radiographic Procedures II contains anatomy and positioning applications of the spine, thorax and skull, correlating with film-critique sessions. Again, a competency – based system of evaluation is utilized. (Spring Semester) Two Laboratory Hours.

    Patient Care and Management II
    1

    This course includes units on pharmacology, drug administration and monitoring of medical equipment. In addition, specialized radiographic procedures are discussed throughout this semester. (Spring Semester)

    Clinical Education II
    2

    In this semester, clinical experiences are provided in general radiographic areas and contrast studies with special emphasis on radiography of the skull and spinal column. It is taken concurrently with the didactic components of the semester and is provided at the College’s clinical affiliates. A competency – based system of evaluation is utilized. (Spring Semester) Sixteen clinical hours (two days).

  • Semester 3
    6
    Clinical Education III
    6

    In the first summer clinical component, the student continues to gain experience in general radiographic and contrast studies, as well as portable and surgical radiography. Experiences are provided at the College’s clinical affiliates. A competency-based system of evaluation continues to be utilized.

  • Semester 4
    18
    Mathematics Elective
    3
    000
    Philosophy / Religious Studies Elective
    3
    Radiation Physics and Protection
    3

    This course explores the phenomena of energy conversion and the interactions between radiation and matter, the electromagnetic spectrum and related radiation concepts. Students will learn about radiation detection and monitoring and the appropriate units of measurement. All aspects of radiation protection and dose reduction for patients and occupational radiation workers are explained.  (Fall Semester)

    Applied Radiologic Pathology I
    3

    This course provides the student with investigation into the basic concepts of radiologic pathology. The student will research a pathologic condition and place emphasis on the disease/injury process, the radiographic appearance and treatment.  Normal anatomy/physiology is reviewed and compared with pathologic abnormalities. There is a focus on the changes which occur as a result of disease and injury which necessitates alteration of standard radiographic exposure applications. (Fall Semester)

    Clinical Education IV
    2

    Specialty clinical experiences continue as the students demonstrate applications of knowledge and skill. This course is taken concurrently with the didactic components of the semester and is provided at the College’s clinical affiliates. A competency – based system of evaluation continues to be utilized. (Spring Semester) Sixteen clinical hours (two days).

    Social Science Elective
    3
    Sectional Anatomy for the Radiographer
    1

    This course is designed to provide the Radiologic Technology student with an overview of human anatomy, viewed in body sections, as it related to imaging.  Anatomical structures are viewed in the axial, coronal and sagittal planes.  Emphasis is places on the head, neck, thorax and abdomen (Fall semester)

  • Semester 5
    15
    Social Science Elective
    3
    Ethics in Health Care
    3

    Modern medicine and health care have created new human ethical problems. This course will explore a number of medical ethical dilemmas, such as end-of-life decisions, defining the concept of death, ordinary versus extraordinary means of treatment, reproductive issues, informed consent, confidentiality, truth-telling, withholding treatment, and the distribution of scarce medical resources, in the light of the principles of autonomy, non-maleficence, beneficence, and justice. One semester of clinical experience is strongly recommended. (Fall, Spring and Summer Semesters)

    Equipment Operation and Maintenance I
    3

    This course covers basic electrical and mechanical examples as applicable to the structure and operation of radiologic equipment. Radiographic generating equipment, image intensification, quality management, and discussion on digital imaging topics as related to digital radiographic equipment and PACS are included.  (Fall Semester)

    Radiation Biology
    2

    This course begins with the effects of radiation on normal cell biology. Factors influencing the molecular and cellular response are discussed. Acute and chronic effects of radiation on tissue, organs, and whole body systems are also presented with in-utero and genetic effects. (Spring Semester)

    Advanced Topics for the Radiographer
    2

    This course offers the student a variety of integrated topics including: advanced positioning methods, special procedures, interventional radiography and computerized tomography (CT).  Numerous special imaging modalities are explored and communicated to the class through student research projects.  Career development engages the student with resume preparation and mock interviewing.  The student technologist will be prepared to contribute to the diagnostic imaging team upon completion of this course.  (Spring Semester)

    Clinical Education V
    2

    Specialty clinical experiences continue as the students demonstrate applications of knowledge and skill. This course is taken concurrently with the didactic components of the semester and is provided at the College’s clinical affiliates. A competency-based system of evaluation continues to be utilized.

  • Semester 6
    6
    Clinical Education VI
    6

    Clinical experience involving general radiography, contrast studies, portable radiography, surgery, and specialty examinations. In addition, the student is provided review opportunities for the American Registry of Radiologic Technologists (R) Examination.

FAQs

Q: What do Radiologist technologists do?
A: Radiologic Technologists (Rad Techs) have a primary responsibility of creating images of the human body using medical equipment that will help doctors diagnose and treat disease and injury. Rad Techs must possess the technical knowledge of the equipment and the knowledge of the human body in order to properly position the patient and obtain the images. Rad Techs may also assist physicians with procedures-such as fluoroscopy exams like Upper GI or Esophagram and intricate procedures like angioplasty or stent placement. Patients can come from a variety of settings such as the Emergency Department, the Operating Room, outpatient, or inpatient.

Q: Will I have to touch patients?
A: Yes, a Rad Tech must have physical contact with patients in order to position them for the exam, assist them with standing, and transferring to the exam table.

Q: Will I see blood?
A: Yes, a Rad Tech will see blood, emesis (vomit), and other bodily fluids.

Q: What are clinicals?
A: Clinical experience is a vital piece of the educational process for a Rad Tech. This hands-on portion of the program that occurs at local healthcare facilities. Students work with experienced technologists and a Trocaire College Clinical Instructor to perform the exams on actual patients.

Q: Where do clinicals take place?
A: Trocaire College Radiologic Technology has approximately 30 recognized clinical affiliates throughout the WNY region, including facilities in Buffalo, Kenmore, Springville, Dunkirk, and Batavia. No clinical site is father from campus than 60 miles one way. Students are responsible for their own transportation to and from clinical. Students will rotate through at least three different sites during their time in the program.

Q: How long are the summer clinicals and what hours?
A: During the summer after each year, students attend clinical for five days a week, eight hours per day, for a five-week duration. These are day shifts only, and typically occur from 7am-3pm or 8am-4pm.

Q: What are the vaccinations needed to enter the program?
In order to participate in the Radiologic Technology program, students must be in good health and free from communicable disease. Students are required to submit and maintain compliance with immunizations and health records including: annual physical; TB (PPD) skin test; Measles, Mumps, and Rubella (MMR); Varicella (Chickenpox); Hepatitis B; Tetanus Pertussis-Diphtheria (TDAP); annual Flu shot; Covid-19.

Q: What expenses can I expect beyond tuition and fees?
A: Rad Tech students are required to wear a uniform to lab class and to the external clinical setting. This uniform is available in the Trocaire College bookstore or any medical scrub retailer. Average cost for a set of scrubs is $60. Other costs may include the annual physical, vaccinations, and CPR. Students may also have to incur parking costs at their clinical site, depending on the location.

Q: What is the ARRT?
A: ARRT is The American Registry of Radiologic Technologists and is the credentialing body for the certification exam taken after successful completion of the program. The “registry”, as it is commonly referred to, is a comprehensive 200-question exam covering four categories: Patient Care, Safety, Image Production, and Procedures. To read more about the ARRT please visit www.arrt.org.

Q: How much radiation will I be exposed to (will I glow in the dark)?
A: Occupational exposure to radiation is kept to a minimum by adhering to established safety guidelines. X-ray rooms have barriers built in that protect Rad Techs safe from unnecessary radiation exposure. Rad Techs also employ other means of protection such as ALARA (As Low As Reasonably Achievable) and wearing protective shielding. The amount of radiation that any individual worker or student is exposed to is dependent on following established protocols.