Course Information

Detailed information on courses offered at Trocaire College

Art Elective | 3 Credits

Art Appreciation | 1 Credit

An introduction to the elements and principles which form the basis of the visual arts. Course content focuses on developing visual awareness and an appreciation of art and artists through discussion, AV presentation and a gallery tour.

Art History | 3 Credits

A survey of the visual arts within a historical and cultural framework. Emphasis is placed on the development of visual perception and expanding critical awareness of selected works of the major periods in the history of art. Includes discussion, AV presentation and field trip(s) to area museums and galleries.

Independent Study | 3 Credits

Study by a qualified student of a more advanced phase of art on a tutorial basis. Previous art history or experience required. Plans must be approved by the Director of Liberal Arts.

Human Biology | 3 Credits

A study of life structure and function from a human perspective. Human organ systems, human evolution and ecology will be presented with a focus on homeostasis, bioethics, and ecology. Three lecture hours. (Fall, Spring and Summer semesters)

Health, Safety and Nutrition for Young Children | 3 Credits

This course provides an in-depth view of the interactions of health, safety and nutrition in relation to the developmental stages of infancy through childhood. Geared toward the child care provider, this course is of great value to anyone in contact with young children. Three lecture hours.

Essentials of Anatomy and Physiology | 3 Credits

A one semester course designed for the allied health careers. It gives an introductory treatment of the structure and function of the human body including cell, skeletal, muscular, nervous, endocrine, respiratory, cardiovascular, digestive, urinary and reproductive systems. Three lecture hours.

Essentials of Anatomy and Physiology Laboratory | 1 Credit

Laboratory experience coincides with lecture topics. Two laboratory hours.

Anatomy and Physiology I | 3 Credits

An introduction to the general principles of human anatomy and physiology with emphasis on the structure and function of the cell, tissues, and the skeletal, muscular, cardiovascular, and lymphatic systems. Three lecture hours. (Fall, Spring and Summer Semester)

Anatomy and Physiology I Laboratory | 1 Credit

Laboratory experience coincides with lecture topics. Two laboratory hours.

Anatomy and Physiology II | 3 Credits

A continuation of Anatomy and Physiology I. Study of the respiratory, nervous, endocrine, digestive, urinary and reproductive systems. Fluid and electrolyte balance also studied. Three lecture hours. (Fall, Spring and Summer)

Anatomy and Physiology II Laboratory | 1 Credit

Laboratory experience coincides with lecture topics. Two laboratory hours.

Introduction to Pharmacology | 3 Credits

This course is an overview of pharmacology and medication as it pertains to the allied health professions. Major classifications of drugs and their indications will be examined, as well as the role of the health professions. Three lecture hours.

General Biology I | 3 Credits

A study of the general principles of biological science. Topics include the scientific method, structure of molecules, the origin of life, biology of the cell, energetics, reproduction and heredity, molecular genetics and evolution. Three lecture hours.

General Biology I Laboratory | 1 Credit

Laboratory experience coincides with lecture topics. Two laboratory hours.

General Biology II | 3 Credits

A continued study of biological principles as evidenced in the diversity of organisms. Topics include the morphology, phylogeny, physiology and ecology of major taxa with evolution as the unifying principle. Three lecture hours.

General Biology II Laboratory | 1 Credit

Laboratory experience coincides with lecture topics. Two laboratory hours.

Environmental Science | 3 Credits

This course is an introduction to how nature works, how the environment has been and is being used and abused, and what you can do to protect and improve it for yourself, and for future generations. Some topics of study include: Ecosystems, Wildlife and the Environment, Environmental Risk and Human Pollution: soil, water and air, Population Dynamics, Waste and Waste Disposal, and past and present attitudes toward the environment and environmental problems. Three lecture hours.

Nutrition & Wellness | 3 Credits

A study of the principles of the science of nutrition, as it relates to daily life and well-being. Topics include personal wellness, digestion, absorption and metabolism of nutrients, planning and evaluating dietary intake. The course will consider social, economic, and psychosocial factors in relationship to dietary practices. This course provides an opportunity to explore areas of special interest such as nutrition for various age levels, weight control, and physical performance. (Fall semester)

Nutrition and Wellness Laboratory | 1 Credit

Laboratory experience coincides with lecture topics. Two laboratory hours.

Sectional Anatomy | 3 Credits

This course focuses on the practical application of sectional anatomy for the Health Science student. The use of sectional anatomy imaging, such as Computed Tomography (CT) and MRI will be stressed. Three lecture hours.

Microbiology | 3 Credits

The study of scientific principles of Microbiology emphasizing the isolation and identification of pathogenic organisms to man in areas of bacteriology, mycology, virology and parasitology. The culture, morphology, general physiology, immunology and applied aspects of the representative micro-organisms will be studied. Three lecture hours. (Fall, Spring and Summer Semesters)

Microbiology Laboratory | 1 Credit

Laboratory experience coincides with lecture topics. Two laboratory hours.

Neurology | 3 Credits

An examination of the structure and function of neural tissue, the anatomy and physiology of the components of the Central Nervous System and the Peripheral Nervous System, embryology of the spinal cord and brain, nerve plexuses, spinal reflexes, and sensory and motor pathways. (Fall Semester)

Advanced Sectional Anatomy | 3 Credits

Advanced cross sectional anatomy provides an integrated approach to learning anatomy by means of correlating cryosections and radiographic cross sectional imaging. This course focuses on the practical application of sectional anatomy for the Health Science student. Emphasis is placed on vessels and organs orientation and relations to other anatomical structures. (Fall Semester)

Pathophysiology | 3 Credits

(Formerly SC 210) A conceptual approach to the dynamic aspects of disease and how it affects normal physiology in relation to alterations, derangements, and mechanisms involved in disease. (Fall, Spring, and Summer Semesters)

Concepts of Pharmacology | 3 Credits

This course will provide a core of fundamental information related to, and the general principles underlying, the use of pharmacological agents in the health occupations. Emphasis on sites of mechanism of action, toxicity, fate, and the uses of major therapeutic and diagnostic agents. (Fall Semester)

Business Elective | 3 Credits

Computer Literacy* | 1 Credit

This course is an introduction to microcomputers, Windows Operating System, microcomputer applications, and the Internet.This course is one credit with one hour learning laboratory. (Fall, Spring and Summer Semester) *Institutional credit only *Placement is based on a computer literacy placement test *Students must recieve a grade of "C" (2.0) or higher to pass this course

Introduction to Contemporary Business | 3 Credits

This is an introductory course which will familiarize the student with the following topic areas: contemporary business and its environment - blending people and technology, the social responsibility of business and ethical behavior, economic challenges, competition in global markets, options for organizing large and small businesses, the entrepreneur, the Internet and the online business environment. This course also explores marketing, business management, and e-commerce. (Fall Semester)

Business Communications I | 3 Credits

Principles and mechanics of effective written and oral communication will be studied in relationship to work and the process using electronic technology and working with teams. International communication will be introduced and studies of listening skills as well as the writing process will be explored. Review of basic English grammar emphasizing principles of punctuation, capitalization, sentence structure, and vocabulary; organizing, developing, and stylization of letters, memorandum, email, and reports will be stressed. Human relations in business writing and oral reporting will be covered. (Fall and Spring Semesters)

Information Technology I | 3 Credits

This course includes practical applications of microcomputers through the use of software packages. Topics include an overview of microcomputer hardware and the operating system, an overview of application software including expected features, comparative analysis and integration. Hands-on experience in the use of the operating system, a major spreadsheet package, a major word processing package, and a major database package. (Fall and Spring Semesters)

Business Law | 3 Credits

This course is designed to acquaint the student with an overview of the American legal system and courts. Areas to be covered are the nature and function of law, legal rights and obligations, formation, operation and discharge of contracts, and the law of sales under the Uniform Commercial Code and business organization. (Spring Semester)

Principles of Accounting | 3 Credits

A sound basic knowledge of accounting terms, concepts, and procedures is stressed in this course. It offers a practical background in accounting for students embarking on business careers covering the full accounting cycle for a sole proprietorship service business. A full accounting cycle for merchandising firms, as well as the impact of microcomputers and their effect on the accounting work environment is also provided. (Fall Semester)

Introduction to Management | 3 Credits

This course provides an overview of the management process with an emphasis on basic management principles and their application to realistic situations. Various types of management styles will be studied with special emphasis on the differences between the domestic and various international management styles. (Fall Semester)

Seminar and Internship | 4 Credits

A supervised on-the-job work experience in a business setting provides the student with the opportunity to apply skills. One-hour weekly seminars will be used to review the work experience. Students will receive one hour of credit for the seminar and three hours of credit for 120 hours of internship. (Spring Semester)

Project Management I | 3 Credits

Project Management is a process to manage personnel, data, resources and time frames to accomplish specific organizational goals and initiatives.  This first of two courses will introduce students to the concepts of project management, why it is used by organizations and the elements that make a project successful or unsuccessful.  This course is designed to guide students through a complete project, project-related meetings, to evaluating progress, revising plans and bringing the project to a successful conclusion.

Project Management II | 3 Credits

Project Management is a process to manage personnel, data, resources and time frames to accomplish specific organizational goals and initiatives.  This second of two courses will introduce students to advanced concepts of project management.  This course is designed to teach students leadership and financial skills and techniques as well as advanced technical project management skills.

Chemistry Elective | 3 Credits

Introduction to Chemistry | 3 Credits

An introduction to chemical concepts for students who have little or no background in chemistry. Topics include: measurement and numbers, chemical terminology, atomic theory, the Periodic Table, chemical bonding, types of chemical reactions, phases of matter and chemical solutions.

General Chemistry I | 3 Credits

A detailed introduction to the basic principles and theories of chemistry. Topics include: physical measurement, matter, atomic theory, chemical reactions, stoichiometry, gas laws, thermochemistry, quantum theory, periodicity, chemical bonding, molecular geometry and chemical solutions. Three lecture hours.

General Chemistry I Laboratory | 1 Credit

This lab designs a course of action based on what the student knows about the principles and theories in order to solve problems by the test results of techniques employed relating to laboratory procedures. Students will interpret results of laboratory experiences and relate their procedures and findings to principles covered in the course. Topics relating to classroom lecture will be presented. Two laboratory hours.

General Chemistry II | 3 Credits

A continuation of General Chemistry I. Topics include: kinetics, equilibrium, acids and bases, solubility, electrochemistry, nuclear chemistry and chemistry of selected elements. Three lecture hours.

General Chemistry II Laboratory | 1 Credit

Laboratory experiences are based on topics covered in lecture which include basic techniques and procedures for identification of various chemical substances. An understanding of proper procedures for determining specific compounds will be achieved.  Two laboratory hours.

Organic Chemistry | 3 Credits

An introduction to the chemistry of carbon-containing compounds. Topics include: nomenclature, organic functional groups, physical properties, chemical bonds, molecular structure, synthesis, reaction mechanisms and stereochemistry. Three lecture hours.

Organic Chemistry Laboratory | 1 Credit

Laboratory experiments will include areas of separation and synthesis of various compounds. Students will also explore the practical application of these techniques in research and industry. Two laboratory hours.

Introduction to Computer Hardware | 4 Credits

This course focuses on computer hardware, in particular, the components of a personal computer. The specific component areas covered include: processors, motherboards, memory, storage, peripherals, portable hardware, and tools and test equipment. General areas/activities include: concepts, specifications, upgrading, and troubleshooting. The course has a highly hands-on orientation. A major activity is the selection of computer components by the class leading to the building of a personal computer by each student (which they then own). (Fall Semester)

Introduction to Computer Networking | 4 Credits

Operating Systems | 3 Credits

This course covers both theoretical concepts and their practical application in all computers. A number of major operating systems are covered. General topics include: concepts, system management, security, installation, configuration, maintenance, and troubleshooting. The course is hands-on and students will work with computers running the different operating systems. Students will install and configure an operating system on the personal computer that they built in a previous class. (Spring Semester)

Network Infrastructure | 3 Credits

This course covers the key network services that are supported by the Network Administrator and required to allow a client-server network to function. Specific topics include: network addressing, name resolution, routing, remote access, and security. General areas/activities include: concepts, installation, configuration, management, maintenance, and troubleshooting. The course is hands-on with operating computer networks used to practice the concepts presented. (Spring Semester)

Linux/Unix | 3 Credits

This course covers the major alternatives to Microsoft's current client and server operating systems - Linux and UNIX. This important family of operating systems plays a key role in the Internet. Coverage includes both Linux and UNIX as a workstation operating system and as a network operating system. The open source software business model is covered. The course is hands-on and personal computers and operating computer networks are used to practice the concepts presented. (Fall Semester)

Network Administration I | 4 Credits

This course, along with CNA 260, are the capstone courses of the program. Typical Network Administrator's responsibilities are covered including: installation, configuration, security, resource allocation, storage management, backup, maintenance, and troubleshooting. The course is hands-on and operating computer networks are used to practice the concepts presented. Server hardware is covered and the class will select server components and then students will build individual servers (which they then own). (Fall Semester)

Visual Basic | 3 Credits

This course is an introduction to computer programming using Visual Basic. The general programming topics of data types, input/output, calculation, flow of control, and program structure are covered. Event-driven and object-oriented programming along with user interface controls are covered in the context of Visual Basic.

Network Planning and Design | 3 Credits

This course involves applying network concepts in planning and designing functional networks. Emphasis is placed on recognizing the need for a network, conducting an analysis, and designing solutions.

Computer Architecture | 3 Credits

This course focuses on the design of computer processors. Topics include: digital electronics, integrated circuit manufacture, design of processors, introduction to machine language, and multiprocessor configurations. This is a hands-on course where students build operating digital circuitry using electronic components on prototyping equipment and practice machine language programming on personal computers.

Network Administration II | 4 Credits

This course, along with CNA 210, are the capstone courses of the program. This course continues the coverage of CNA 210 Network Administration. The course is hands-on and operating computer networks are used to practice the concepts presented. (Spring Semester)

Computer Security | 3 Credits

Computer security is a critical issue in the computer and network field. This course covers the full range of threats and the responses for both networks and individual devices on the networks. Hardware, software, and procedural security solutions are covered. The course is hands-on and operating computer networks are used to practice the concepts presented. (Spring Semester)

Project Management | 3 Credits

This course covers general project management concepts, tools, and techniques.  A popular project management software package is used to practice the techniques.

Seminar & Internship/Capstone | 2 Credits

A supervised 120 hour, on-the-job work internship experience in a computer networking setting.  The internship provides the student with the opportunity to apply skills. As a second option, an approved research project may be completed in lieu of the internship. The seminars will be used to review the work /project experience and to cover career preparation skills.  (Spring Semester)

Independent Study | 3 Credits

Study of a more advanced nature based on previous computer network coursework, developed and applied by individual students on a tutorial basis. Plans must be approved by the director of the program.

Cross Sectional Anatomy | 3 Credits

This course will focus on the basic sectional anatomy of the neck, abdomen and pelvis building upon the basic knowledge of anatomy. It will prepare the student to recognize sectional anatomy of major human structures amenable to sonographic technique. (Fall Semester)

Introduction to Diagnostic Medical Sonography | 3 Credits

This course provides the student with an orientation to the field of Diagnostic Medical Sonography followed by the techniques for assisting and monitoring patients. Ethics and patient care procedures pertinent to sonography will be covered. Chart reading and record keeping relative to clinical medicine will be presented. The student will study and investigate the principles underlying sonographic visualization. This will include the theoretical concepts of image reproduction, pertinent equipment considerations and alternative methods of information storage and display. This course includes college laboratory experience on basic scanning technique relative to college lecture material. (Fall Semester)

Physics of Ultrasound I | 2 Credits

Fundamental principles of acoustical physics including wave propagation, acoustical impedance properties, and transducer characteristics will be presented. Basic types of equipment and instrumentation are discussed. Doppler Principles are introduced. (Fall Semester)

Abdominal Sonography I | 2 Credits

Abdominal Sonography I provides the student with information necessary to perform an abdominal sonographic examination. Normal anatomy will be reviewed as well as an emphasis on the detection of pathology, anomalies and deviation from the normal sonographic appearance. Correlation with clinical tests and related clinical signs and symptoms will be included. (Fall Semester)

Abdominal Sonography Laboratory I | 1 Credit

The student is provided with college laboratory experiences on abdominal scanning techniques and protocol relative to the abdominal structures and their physiology. (Fall Semester)

Pelvic Sonography | 2 Credits

Pelvic sonography provides the student with information necessary to perform a pelvic sonographic examination. Normal anatomy will be reviewed as well as an emphasis on the detection of pathology, anomalies and deviation from the normal sonographic appearance. Correlation with clinical tests and related signs and symptoms will be included. (Fall Semester)

Pelvic Sonography Laboratory | 1 Credit

The student is provided with college laboratory experiences on pelvic scanning techniques and protocol relative to the pelvic structures and their physiology. (Fall Semester)

Sonography Clinical Practicum I | 3 Credits

This course concentrates on the development of initial practical skills in basic sonographic procedures. Emphasis is on the role of initial observer to assistant under the close supervision of faculty and sonography staff, and is provided at area diagnostic medical sonography clinical sites. (Fall Semester) Twenty four hours per week.

Obstetrical Sonography | 3 Credits

This course provides the student with the fundamentals of obstetrical scanning of normal and abnormal anatomy. Fetal development, including abnormal etiology and diagnostic techniques are presented. The detection of abnormalities, pathologies and deviation from normal are stressed. (Spring Semester)

Physics of Ultrasound II | 1 Credit

This course focuses on practical applications of principles and concepts presented in "Physics of Ultrasound I." In addition, the student is provided opportunities for preparation for the American Registry of Diagnostic Medical Sonographers (ARDMS) certification examination in Ultrasound Physics and Instrumentation. (Spring Semester)

Abdominal Sonography II | 2 Credits

This is a continuation of the in-depth study of abdominal sonography. The didactic and clinical knowledge necessary to perform basic sonographic examinations of anatomy classified as "small parts" will also be presented. (Spring Semester)

Abdominal Sonography Laboratory II | 1 Credit

The student is provided with college laboratory experiences on advanced abdominal scanning techniques and protocol relative to the abdominal structures and their physiology. (Spring Semester)

Seminar/Research Course | 1 Credit

This course is devised to help the student become familiar with describing sonographic images and correlating the descriptions with clinical histories. This is accomplished with case study presentations. The student will also develop research skills by writing a paper on an approved topic. A brief presentation of their topic will complete the course. (Spring Semester)

Special Sonographic Procedures | 2 Credits

This course introduces the student to the field of vascular sonography with the main focus on the carotid arterial and lower peripheral venous system. Obstetrical and Gynecological doppler applications will also be presented. (Spring Semester)

Sonography Clinical Practicum II | 3 Credits

This supervised off-campus experience continues to provide the student development of skills in scanning abdomens, with progression into the areas of obstetrical and gynecological applications. Small parts and Doppler techniques will be introduced. (Spring Semester) Twenty four hours per week.

Sonography Clinical Practicum III | 6 Credits

In this final and extended period of clinical study, the student progresses to full independence under the supervision of faculty and sonography staff. Upon demonstration of full competency, the student will have an opportunity to refine his/her skills through more independent practice. (Summer) Forty hours per week for twelve weeks.

Principles of Microeconomics | 3 Credits

This course offers an explanation of how the market system operates in the context of limited resources. Emphasis is placed on the manner in which individual business firms and consumers determine what to produce, how to produce, and for whom to produce. (Spring Semester)

Introduction to Echocardiography | 1 Credit

This course provides the student with an overview to the field of echocardiography, medical terminology related to procedures and instrumentation, and indications for use. Areas covered will include role of echocardiographer, legal/ethical issues and universal precautions. An overview of the program will be given. (Fall Semester)

Echocardiography I | 2 Credits

This course includes a study of examinations, techniques, measurements, equipment and patient preparation for 2-D Imaging, M-Mode, Doppler and Color Doppler of the normal adult and pediatric hearts. Correlation with other cardiac evaluation methods will be presented such as: angiography and cardiac catherization, electrocardiograph, electrophysiologic studies, Holter monitoring, stress testing, radionuclide studies, other topographic imaging procedures, phonocardiography, external pulse recordings, Thallium tests and Stress echocardiography. (Fall Semester)

Echocardiography College Laboratory I | 1 Credit

This course includes college laboratory experience on basic scanning techniques as presented in lecture. (Fall Semester)

Echocardiography Principles and Instrumentation | 3 Credits

A study of the principles of Ultrasound instruments, modes of operation, operator control options, frequency selection, scanning motions and planes in a cardiac examination, patient histories and physical signs, patient preparations and doppler vs. color doppler protocols are a few of the areas to be covered. Basic generalized pathology of the different organs will be covered. (Fall Semester)

Anatomy and Physiology of the Heart | 3 Credits

This course provides the student with the normal anatomy of the pericardial and thoracic cavities, including the skeletal framework, the normal anatomy of the heart’s large vessels, embryology development, cardiac physiology, the function of circulation, coronary circulation, parameters of arterial pressure measurement and heart pressures. Students will study the normal sonographic appearances. (Fall Semester)

Echocardiography Clinical Practicum I | 3 Credits

This course concentrates on the development of initial practical skills in basic echocardiography procedures. Emphasis is on the role of the initial observer to assistant under the close supervision of faculty and sonography staff and is provided at area echocardiography clinical sites. Twenty-four hours per week. (Fall Semester)

Echocardiography II | 4 Credits

This course will focus on the recognition and identification of cardiac pathologies with their hemodynamics in different types of heart disease. Students will learn their echographic structures. Echocardiography diagnostic procedures will be discussed such as: stress, transesophageal and intraoperative echocardiography giving indications, limitations, technical procedures and clinical pharmacology. Fetal echocardiography will be introduced. Registry style examinations will be given. (Spring Semester)

Seminar/Research Course | 2 Credits

This course is designed to help the student become familiar with describing sonographic images and correlating the ddescruptiong with clinical histories.  This is accomplished with case study presentations.  Student case presentations and literature reviews are required.  The student will also develop research skills by writing a paper on an approved topic.  A brief presentation of their topic will complete the course.  (Spring semester)

Pathology of the Heart | 4 Credits

This course will give the student an in depth study of the cardiac pathologies, their physiological symptoms, outcomes, and their sonographic appearance.  Special attention will be given to the mitral and tricuspid values, acquired aortic and pulmonic valvular heart disease.  Other areas cover will include cardiac trauma, prosthetic heart valves and pediatric congenital heart disease.  Pediatric congenital heart disease will be presented.  (Spring Semester)

Echocardiography Clinical Practicum II | 3 Credits

This supervised off-campus experience continues to provide the students development of skills in scanning procedures.  (Spring Semester)  Twenty four hours per week.

Echocardiopgraphy Clinical Practicum III | 6 Credits

In this final and extended period of clinical study, the student progresses to full independence under the supervision of faculty and sonography staff. The student will be prepared to function as a beginning Echocardiographer and will be ready to sit for the RDCS examination given in October.  This course is an extension to the learning that the student encountered during the first and second semesters.  (Summer) Forty hours per week for twelve weeks.

Echocardiography College Laboratory II | 1 Credit

The student is provided with college laboratory experience on basic scanning techniques related to college lecture material.  (Spring Semester)

Principles of Macroeconomics | 3 Credits

The course focuses on using economic methodology in the study of macroeconomic principles. Topics include derivation of GNP, the impact of fiscal and monetary policy on output, employment, and cost level. Current economic issues will be discussed. (Spring Semester)

Intermediate Reading* | 3 Credits

This course is a reading comprehension and critical reasoning course that covers the essential reading and comprehension skills.  These skills include understanding literal and figurative meaning, identifying the main idea, recognizing supporting details and transitions and identifying quotes paraphrases. Topics include: fact and opinion, author's purpose and tone, patterns of organization, critical thinking, inference, and argument. (Fall, Spring and Summer Semesters) *Institutional credit only *Placement is based on accuplacer scores. *Students must receive a grade of "C" (2.0) or higher to pass this course.

Basics of Composition* | 3 Credits

This course emphasizes sentence structure, paragraph development and the basic elements of composition. Students are assigned to this class according to performance on the College Placement Test. (Fall, Spring and Summer Semester) *Institutional credit only *Placement is based on Accuplacer scores. *Students must receive a grade of "C" (2.0) or higher to pass this course.

English Composition | 3 Credits

The course seeks to aid the communication process by developing the ability to write clear, concise, expository prose, with emphasis on pre-writing and revision. It assists the student in finding a voice and an audience. A research paper is required, thus techniques of writing a formal research paper are reviewed. (Fall, Spring and Summer Semesters)

Introduction to Literature | 3 Credits

A study of the basic elements of short fiction, poetry and drama. By exploring form and design in the arts, this course provides opportunities for students to discover inter-relatedness of theme and type, to develop critical analysis skills, and to make connections with elements in other disciplines. Critical reading and analysis papers are required. (Fall, Spring and Summer Semesters)

Advanced Composition | 3 Credits

The course develops critical thinking, reading, and writing skills as they apply to the analysis of primary and secondary non-fiction books, articles, and essays from a range of academic and cultural contexts. The course emphasizes the techniques and principles of effective research-bases writing.

Readings in World Literature | 3 Credits

A survey course focusing on selected classics of the literature from Eastern, Western, and African cultures. Selections include works from ancient, medieval, and modern societies. The goal of this course is to enable students to understand the similarities that surround the human condition and to appreciate the differences evidenced in each culture's response to the complexities of human life.

Communication Arts | 3 Credits

An opportunity to develop the art of communicating with ease in business and professional situations. Students will examine the relationship of speaker and audience, noting techniques of effective communication. This course will focus on multicultural verbal and nonverbal skills.

Children's Literature | 3 Credits

An introduction to the qualities of style, theme, and illustrations demonstrated in the finest children’s literature. Throughout the semester students will read and evaluate a variety of stories, fantasies, tales, and poetry written by past and current writers of literature focusing on children's needs, interests, and concerns. This course includes authors and illustrators from various cultures and ethnic groups.

American Literature | 3 Credits

The study and exploration of writings that have contributed significantly to the unique quality of American literature. Well known poems, stories, and other selections as well as lesser known works will be examined.

Explorations in Poetry | 3 Credits

The study and appreciation of poetry through a consideration of poetry as an art form. This course examines poetic techniques, themes, and symbolic language through a study of selected works.

Short Story | 3 Credits

An examination of a cross-section of short fiction by both American and inter-continental authors. Cultural connections, themes, and principles basic to the structure of short story will be explored.

Drama | 3 Credits

The study of drama through a variety of plays to the conventions of drama and drama’s role in reflecting the human situation. Focus is on connections within and beyond cultural differences.

Film As Literature | 3 Credits

An investigation and focus on elements of film literature such as theme, character development, plot structure, narration, point of view, and purpose.

Creative Writing | 3 Credits

An opportunity for the student to experience the process of imaging and creating various forms of prose and poetry with emphasis on original works.

Independent Study | 3 Credits

Study of a more advanced nature based on previous English course work, developed and applied by individual students on a tutorial basis. Plans must be approved by the Director of Liberal Arts.

Public Relations Writing | 3 Credits

This course surveys various elements of public relations and public relations writing. It involves exploring the foundations and meaning of public relations, the ethical and legal issues involved in public relations writing, the principles of public relations writing, writing persuasively, writing for specific publics, writing for mass media and writing speeches and presentations. Additionally, the course requires concentrated practice in writing for a variety of public relations circumstances: news releases, video news releases, public service announcements, advertising copy, broadcast media, print media, e-mails, memos, letters, reports, proposals, and speeches. (Fall Semester)

Race, Gender, and Literature | 3 Credits

This course will seek to explore the ways in which literature addresses the issues of Race and Gender in the postmodern/postcolonial context. Breaking free from the traditional understanding of literature as an imaginative work of art, the selected readings will showcase the nexus between the literary and the political. The course will deal with the categories of ‘race’ and ‘gender’ as sociological constructs propagated within the political framework of ‘othering’. The lectures and readings will examine the varied representations and negations of the general understanding of these concepts, and how literary writers articulate their specific concerns to challenge the ideological tropes of our mainstream society. To explore the issues of race and gender, students will be introduced to works by the twentieth century African, Caribbean, African American writers, Black feminists, Queer theory, and Gay and Lesbian writing.

College Seminar* | 1 Credit

The College Seminar is a course designed to provide students strategies for successful learning in college and beyond. Topics in the course include: learning styles, learning and study strategies, cognitive strategies, time management, goal-setting, note-taking, test-taking strategies, overcoming test anxiety, cultural diversity, and other issues that focus on enabling students to become better achievers. The course is one credit with a one hour laboratory. Students are requires to take this course in their first semester at Trocaire College. (Fall, Spring and Summer Semester) *Students must receive a grade of "C" (2.0) or higher to pass this course.

Information and Research Basics | 1 Credit

This course is an introduction to information literacy using library research methods and resources. Students will learn to access scholarly information through a variety of resources: books, journals, databases, streaming media and different platforms of electronic resources (eBooks, reference collections, image databases).  Students will learn the best practices for evaluating resources in order to obtain academic research and information.  Students will learn not only how to fully use the Libraries@Trocaire as a search destination, but how to use other libraries and the Internet to become effective information users today and in the future.  Topics include creating keyword searches to effectively use databases and electronic periodicals in research, evaluating websites on the Internet, citation and style guides, plagiarism, library catalog searching, fair use and open source information, Interlibrary loan and InfoPass.  (Fall and Spring semesters)

College Success* | 3 Credits

The College Success is a course designed to provide students strategies for successful learning in college and beyond. It is part of the Transitional Studies curriculum. Central to the course is students' intensive work in learning strategies and the use of the diagnostic tool, Learning and Study Strategies Inventory (LASSI). Topics in the course include: learning styles, learning and study strategies, cognitive strategies, time management, goal-setting, note-taking, test-taking strategies, overcoming test anxiety, cultural diversity, and other issues that focus on enabling students to become better achievers. This course is three credits and is open only to new Trocaire students who participate in Transitional Studies. They are required to take this course their first semester at Trocaire College. (Fall and Spring Semesters) *Placement is based on participation in Transitional Studies *Students must receive a grade of "C" (2.0) or higher to pass this course.

Information Fluency and Research Skills | 2 Credits

The course will include in-depth steps in the research process through the learning and application of critical/analytical thinking skills used to formulate effective standard searches, and to understand the organization and evaluation of information in print, electronic, and other formats. The student will learn how to use the OPAC (online public access catalog) at the Trocaire College Library as well as how to locate materials in ANY Library through the use of Dewey Decimal Classification, the Library of Congress Classification and the Library of Congress Subject Headings; how to search a variety of electronic databases and Internet resources and the correct MLA and APA citation styles for a works cited page. Students will evaluate the quality of web-based (including bogus sites) and print information. At the completion of this course the student will be "information fluent" by knowing how information is produced, organized and accessed within the practical and ethical aspects of intellectual freedom and copyright guidelines.

General Studies Seminar | 1 Credit

This course is designed to assist the student in the transition from college to career be developing the knowledge and skills necessary for future success.  Topics include establishing career goals, work-related values, skills and job search strategies.  A professional Portfolio will be developed in the class.  Students will meet individually or in small groups with the instructor.  (Offered as needed)

Multiculturalism | 3 Credits

The course in Multiculturalism takes an interdisciplinary perspective that addresses the major issues of culture including: race/ethnicity, social class, worldviews, generational differences, sexual orientation, disabilities, religion, and geographic location. Culture is addressed through the integration of related issues of personal identity development and experiences and the resultant choices of preferred styles of life, morals, ethics, and values from a western perspective, but also an appreciation of how this varies from non-western perspectives. This can be addressed within the parameters of the varied fields within the Liberal Arts including, but not limited to; English, History, Philosophy, Psychology, Sociology, and any branches within each. *Students must be in their fourth year of study (90 credits completed) to take this course.

World Civilizations I | 3 Credits

A survey of certain proto-civilizations and early cultures beginning with the emergence of settled agricultural societies in Mesopotamia, Egypt, and China and ranging up to about A.D. 1492. This course will focus broadly on those experiences which contributed key ingredients to early civilizations and, thus, to the rich global mosaic of cultures from which many modern societies derive their unique personalities and histories.

Introduction to Health Information Systems | 4 Credits

This course is designed to provide an introduction to the field of Health Information (Medical Record) Science. Topics include: history of the development of the Health Information profession; organization and structure of healthcare facilities; Medical Staff organization; analysis of the functions of a Health Information Department in a health facility such as confidentiality, file/retrieval/record control systems, indexes and registers, storage and retention of health records, qualitative and quantitative analysis. (Fall Semester)

Health Information Systems | 3 Credits

Student learn to utilize software application in the healthcare industry and specific to the health information department of a healthcare facility. Hardware and software systems, databases, and electronic health records will be included. Overview of selection and development of a system, data quality, security control, confidentiality, and report management will be emphasized. (Fall Semester)

Legal Aspects of Health Information | 3 Credits

Students become familiar with the health record as a legal document, the role of the Health Information department in legal proceedings, laws pertaining to the release of information, security and confidentiality of health records. The course includes a study of the U.S. court system. Bio ethical issues which supplement the course in ethics in health care are presented for discussion. (Spring Semester)

Clinical Practicum I | 2 Credits

Students will complete 45 hours over 15 weeks in classroom lab setting and will complete the other 45 hours over 6 weeks (8 hours per day, 1 day per week) onsite at a hospital under the supervision of a qualified Allied Health Professional. The student competencies/objectives of this course include application of knowledge acquired during the first year of the program to include; chart assembly, file, and retrieval control procedures; chart analysis and deficiency tracking; compilation and quantitative analysis of health statistics; NYS required registries; release of information and correspondence discharge date abstracting; utilization review/case management; credentialing and compliance/ risk management. (Spring Semester)

Health Statistics | 3 Credits

This course introduces students to a study of methods for compiling statistics for hospital administration, medical staff, and licensing and accreditation agencies. Vital statistics, public health statistics, and hospital statistics are covered. An introduction to research techniques with graphic presentation of medical data is also covered. (Fall and Spring Semesters)

Inpatient Coding Systems | 4 Credits

This course introduces students to principles and application of the ICD-9-CM and CPT coding system and will be discussing the ICD-10 coding system. There will be an Introduction to the Official Coding Guidelines for Coding and Reimbursement. The theory and practice of coding medical records using manual methods and encoder software systems will be used. (Fall Semester)

Quality Assurance and Improvement | 2 Credits

This course introduces students to the areas of a Quality Management (QA). Other highlights of this course include projects where students apply the tools for identifying and displaying health care data and utilize quality improvement tools. (Fall and Spring Semesters)

Clinical Practicum II | 2 Credits

Students will complete 45 hours over 15 weeks in classroom lab setting and they will complete the other 45 hours over 9 weeks (8 hours per day, 1 day per week) onsite at an alternate care setting under the supervision of a qualified Allied Health Professional. The student competencies/ objectives of this course include application of knowledge acquired during the first year of the program to include: chart assembly, file and retrieval control procedures; chart analysis and deficiency tracking; compilation and quantitative analysis of health statistics; NYS required registries; release of information and correspondence; ICD-9-CM and PPS coding; CPT and HCPCS coding; discharge data abstracting; utilization review / case management; quality assessment and improvement; credentialing and compliance / risk management. (Spring Semester)

Ambulatory Care Coding | 3 Credits

This course introduces student a study of CPT-4 and ICD-9-CM and will discuss the ICD-10 coding system as it relates to ambulatory coding. An overview of ambulatory coding and data collection will be included. (Spring Semester)

Management Principles for Health Information | 2 Credits

This course introduces students to supervisory concepts including planning, organizing, controlling, and actuating techniques. Areas of focus will include staffing, communication, productivity, motivation, leadership styles, committee activities, and the role and the functions of the Health Information management team. This course also introduces students to quality management, utilization review, and risk management. (Spring Semester)

Survey of Healthcare Delivery | 1 Credit

This course introduces students to the study of regulatory issues, content, use and structure of healthcare data and date sets as they relate to long term care facilities, home health agencies, hospice, mental health facilities, ambulatory care, physician’s offices and others. The financing of health care services will be discussed as it relates to the various payment and reimbursement system. (Spring Semester)

Health Information Seminar | 1 Credit

This course introduces students to the principle of health information consulting and business requirement for self-employment. Resume preparation and interviewing techniques demonstrated. Certification exam preparation. (Spring Semester)

Health Care Law & Compliance | 3 Credits

This course focuses on the legal and compliance issues that directly affect both the employer and the employee regarding accreditation and compliance issues. In addition, information is given on risk management techniques including reporting that can help mitigate non-compliance. (Spring Semester)

Healthcare Systems and Operations | 3 Credits

This course would introduce and reinforce healthcare specific terminology associated with regulations, legal issues, accreditation, finance and reimbursement, managed care, quality and patient safety, and government oversight agencies. One area of focus will be on hospital systems with an in depth evaluation of the different departments that are within a hospital as well as the overall operations of a hospital from the perspective of the management’s techniques, technologies, and services that must be rendered to patients. Other systems used in data exchange will be introduced and discussed.

Introduction to Healthcare Informatics | 3 Credits

This is an introductory course for students that cover the history of the rapidly evolving discipline of healthcare informatics. Students will explore critical issues and challenges facing informatics professionals today along with an overview of new information technology applications and how they have improved the management and delivery of healthcare. Topics include HIPAA and other legislation, application of electronic health records, and other clinical and administrative applications of health information systems.

Legal, Regulatory and Ethical Issues in Healthcare | 3 Credits

This course provides an overview of the legal, regulatory, and ethical issues to be considered in the implementation, management, and maintenance of electronic health record systems. Local, state, federal and international privacy laws and regulations, in particular the Health Insurance Portability and Accountability Act of 1996 (HIPAA), along with the government agencies and regulatory bodies charged with oversight will be discussed.

Healthcare Informatics Data Standards | 3 Credits

This course examines the importance of consistency in health data, the current data standards, future federal initiatives and the standards lead organizations are using. An evaluation of ontology, acronyms, coding and classifications systems utilized in health information technology will be evaluated from the perspective of the users of the systems and by those who design and maintain those systems. Software applications such as Excel will be introduced and used for assignments.

Business Systems Analysis and Design in Healthcare | 3 Credits

This course promotes the conceptual and skill based learning needed to understand the process of analyzing and designing information systems. The course focuses on the analysis involved in the systems development process and the steps involved in understanding and modeling the user needs in an information system solution. The course will touch on project planning and management aspects and the design of computer programs in order to provide an overview of the whole information system development process. Development of architectural diagrams/design will be explored.

Healthcare Administration and Management | 3 Credits

The course focuses on the delivery, quality and costs of healthcare for individuals and populations. A managerial perspective of the challenges facing professionals operating within hospital, ambulatory care, long term care, and public health settings will be presented. Emphasis will be on costs, financing, organizational structures, quality outcomes, and accessibility of care.

Healthcare Leadership and Change Management | 3 Credits

This course addresses the role of the informatics professional in helping an organization embrace change. The course will focus on the struggle between administration, and clinicians to identify the best solutions that will support the unique structures within healthcare organizations and the behaviors within these organizations that impact decision making. Challenges and solutions will be evaluated from a macro (organization-wide) perspective and micro (specialty and individual level) perspective, with emphasis on aligning work to be carried out against organizational values, mission and vision and gaining consensus that a selected solution will effectively deliver services within an organization.

Clinical Decision Support Systems | 3 Credits

The course discusses the significant role clinical decision support systems play in the field of clinical knowledge management technologies. The topic will take a deep dive into their capacity to support the clinical process and use of knowledge, from diagnosis and investigation through treatment and long-term care.

Database Healthcare Management Systems | 3 Credits

This course will introduce fundamental database concepts used to develop and implement database systems, the relational model along with the use of structured query language (SQL). Principles of good database design will be used to illustrate the construction of databases, as well as evaluating implementation methods and approaches.

Healthcare Informatics Practicum | 3 Credits

This course provides students an opportunity to apply and integrate knowledge and skills acquired throughout the program in a simulated EHR environment. Students will have hands-on activities and real world exercises.

Western Civilization I | 3 Credits

A survey of the history of Western Civilization. Proceeds from the ancient early civilizations of Mesopotamia and Egypt through the Classical Ages up to the Renaissance and contact between the New and Old Worlds. Examines themes, notions, personalities and events of that epoch.

Western Civilization II | 3 Credits

A survey of the Reformation to modern times. Examines the evolution of religion, politics, social realities, the Great Wars, and more recent global implications of the Western experience. (Alternating Semesters)

World Civilizations II | 3 Credits

This course addresses certain general cultural and historical aspects of more recent civilizations and societies. Focuses on the effects of permanent contact between the Old and New Worlds, the emergence of independent nation states (and nationalities), the so-called "Third World" of former colonial dependencies, and the recent trend toward an increasingly diverse, "global" society.

The American Experience: Pre-Contact to Civil War | 3 Credits

A survey of the early American experience. Ranges from an analysis of pre-Contact aboriginal cultures through Independence to and including the Civil War. Emphasizes the social, cultural, and intellectual aspects of that experience.

The American Experience: Reconstruction to The Contemporary Period | 3 Credits

A survey of the more recent American experience. Ranges from Reconstruction (with its social and racial implications) to and through the emergence of capitalism, imperialism, the Great Wars, the Depression, up to the modern era of Civil Rights and Women’s Rights movements.

Issues in The American Experience | 3 Credits

A seminar-type course which selects and examines an important topic or issue in the American historical experience. Recent topics have included "The City and Change," "War and Its Meanings," and "Race and Its Implications for Americans." This course emphasizes a core of common readings, discussion and participation, guest lecturers, and a final formal paper. (Offered as needed)

History of Technology in Modern Society | 3 Credits

Course content will provide an in-depth look at the history of technology with a particular focus on the impact of technology, science and medical instrumentation on American society. The most important technological advances in medical imaging will be discussed and topics posed for detailed presentation by students pertaining to tomographic visualization, molecular imaging, CT, PET, MRI, fluorescence imaging and/or other topics previously approved by the instructor. Emphasis will be placed on conceptual content and the impact of technology in society as new technologies are continuing to be developed and applied to improve our quality of life. (Fall Semester)

Hospitality Elective | 3 Credits

Introduction to Hospitality | 3 Credits

This course takes a management perspective in introducing students to the organization and structure of hotels, restaurants, food service operations, clubs, cruise ships, convention bureaus, conference centers and casino hotels. Other topics include: business ethics, franchising, management contracts, and areas of management responsibility such as human resources, marketing and sales, and advertising. (Fall Semester)

Introduction to Food and Beverage Management | 3 Credits

This course will give students a basic understanding of the working of a commercial kitchen. Topics covered include: culinary professionalism, knife skills, food preparation skills, kitchen management, kitchen safety, food handling and equipment identification. (Fall Semester) Lab fee applied and uniform required.

World Travel Geography and Cultural Awareness | 3 Credits

From high level business negotiations to casual conversations among friends, every interpersonal interaction is shaped by cultural norms and expectations. Seldom is this more clearly brought to light than in encounters between people from different cultural backgrounds, when dissimilar communication practices may lead to frustration and misunderstanding. This thought-provoking class will present a new framework for understanding the impact of culture on communication and to help students build inter-cultural communication and awareness competence. With illustrative examples from around the globe and frequent hands-on experiences of different cultures, this class will show that verbal and nonverbal communication involves much more than transmitting a particular message - it also reflects each participant's self-image, group identification and values, and privacy and relational needs. The class will learn to move effectively and appropriately through a wide range of trans-cultural situations by combining culture-specific knowledge with mindful listening and communication skills. (Spring Semester)

Planning and Control for Food and Beverage Operations | 3 Credits

This course will cover the principles and procedures involved in an effective food and beverage control system, including product cost, labor cost, controllable and non-controllable cost, profit margin analysis, break even analysis, menu pricing, electronic controls, operating budgets, and computer applications.

Food and Beverage Service and Sanitation | 3 Credits

This course is focused on service techniques, responsible alcohol service and safe food handling. The course presents principles and theories to support and reinforce the practical aspects. ServSafe Certification (safe food handling) and T.I.P.S. Certification (Training for Intervention Procedures: responsible alcohol service) are taught during this course. (Spring Semester) Lab fee applied and uniform required.

Principles of Hotel and Resort Service and Management | 3 Credits

This course focuses on the flow of business through a hotel, from the reservations process to check-out and settlement. The course will highlight the different departments that are within a hotel, while explaining the proper management techniques and service that must be rendered to guests. (Spring Semester)

Leadership and Management in Hospitality | 3 Credits

Students will learn how to improve their leadership abilities and develop an understanding of high-performance teams and employee empowerment. New information will provide students with an understanding of diversity and cultural change. Practical information prepares them to put management tools into action to enhance service and boost business. Principles and mechanics of effective written and oral communication, active listening skills and human relations are developed. (Spring Semester)

Hospitality Information Systems | 3 Credits

Provides an overview of the information needs of lodging properties and food service establishments, addresses essential aspects of computer systems, such as hardware, software and generic applications, focuses on computer-based property management systems for both front office and back office functions, examines features of computerized restaurant management systems; describes hotel sales computer applications, revenue management strategies, and accounting applications, addresses the selection and implementation of computer systems; focuses on managing information systems; and examines the impact of the Internet and prove intranets in the hospitality industry.

Hospitality Sales and Marketing | 3 Credits

This course is designed to provide students with a solid background in hospitality sales, advertising, and marketing. The textbook's main focus is on practical sales techniques for selling to targeted markets. (Fall Semester)

Human Resources Management in Hospitality | 3 Credits

This course presents a systematic approach to human resources management in the hospitality industry. Students will analyze contemporary issues and practices, as well as employment laws that have an impact on the way people are managed. (Fall Semester)

Event Planning in Action | 3 Credits

This course is designed to equip the student with the skills necessary to market, plan and implement meetings and events. Site selection, program planning, logistics, material development, transportation, food and beverage service and lodging will be considered.

Current Trends in Hospitality and Tourism Management Research | 3 Credits

This research based course will analyze current trends in the Hospitality and Tourism industry locally, domestically, and internationally.  Each semester a topic case study, or problem will be submitted to students.  In collaboration with faculty members, students, as a team, will develop a hypothesis, conduct primary and secondary research, analyze and interpret research, and report their findings.

Culinary Foundations I | 3 Credits

Students master the basics of food production, learn many creative ideas, and understand not only how to use ingredients and processes, but why they are used. Describes essential knowledge for understanding professional culinary preparation, including hot food preparation, cold food preparation (garde manger), and baking. Sanitation, proper storage and handling of food, and creative presentation of food are also discussed. Lab fee applied and uniform required.

Culinary Foundations II | 3 Credits

This course provides a continuation into food preparation and is intended for students who have a strong desire to enter into the food and beverage sector of the industry. Students in this course will learn additional skills in banquet and catering preparation, regional cuisine and various world fusion cuisines. Lab fee applied and uniform required.

Hospitality Internship | 4 Credits

Students will be exposed to practical field experience by being placed at one of our internship host sites. The basis of this course is for students to gain valuable hands-on experience by rotating through a variety of positions at the host site. Salvatore's Grand Hotel and Russell's Steaks, Chops & More are the preferred locations for students to complete their internship experiences. Areas such as hotel and restaurant operations, front desk, housekeeping, culinary arts, restaurant and food service management and banquet preparation and service are all examples of the areas of concentration.

Disney Internship Experience | 6 Credits

Also known as the Walt Disney World College Program, the Disney Internship Experience is designed to allow a Trocaire student to work in an industry position at Disney World in Orlando, Florida. This takes place during the fall or spring semester and students may take up to two classes from Disney to earn academic credit. This is a cooperative education experience designed to integrate classroom theory and practical work experience, lend increased relevancy to learning, and provide the student with realistic exposure to career opportunities with Disney. Interested students must attend the Disney presentation and apply for a Disney internship position. Candidates are interviewed and selected by the Disney Internship recruiter. Students generally work a minimum of 600 hours, and are required to submit a written journal and an oral presentation to the internship instructor. Disney will complete a performance evaluation on the student.  Students must meet all of the Disney requirements to enroll in this course. Expenses for travel, lodging and recreation will be incurred. Course can be taken in place of HM276.

Intro to Human Resources | 3 Credits

This is an introductory course that will develop theoretical and practical knowledge in the major areas of human resource management, including recruiting, selecting, training, developing, evaluating, and compensating employees. (Fall Semester)

Recruitment, Selection & Ethics | 3 Credits

This is an introductory course that will take a strategic approach to the identification, attraction, selection, deployment, and retention of talent within an environment that emphasizes ethical, just, and fair treatment of those involved. (Fall Semester)

Organizational Behavior | 3 Credits

This course explores the systematic integration of economic, technological, and psychological variables useful in observing predicting and influencing organizational behavior.  Students develop ways of thinking about organizational problems to increase their effectiveness.  The course will focus on HR's role in understanding and shaping culture within their organizations.  (Spring Semester)

Workplace Learning and Performance | 3 Credits

This course combines the theory and application surrounding the learning-teaching experience to give the practitioner the ability to create training programs that advance organizational outcomes. In so doing, it pays particular attention to planning, learner motivation, the training process - needs analysis, training design, validation, implementation, and evaluation, and training methods. (Spring Semester)

Employee and Labor Relations | 3 Credits

This course examines the environment of labor relations, the activity of collective bargaining, and the need for administering an agreement after it is signed. (Spring Semester)

Benefits and Compensation | 3 Credits

This is a course that will explore the art and science of compensation practice – including compensation criteria, compensation system design issues, employee benefits, challenges of compensating key employee groups, and global affects - and its role in promoting companies’ competitive advantage. (Spring Semester)

Massage Therapy Elective | 3 Credits

Introduction to Massage Therapy | 3 Credits

This course provides an introduction to massage therapy, communication skills, client interaction, and ethics. (Fall Semester)

Western Massage Therapy I | 4 Credits

This course provides an introduction to the practice of western massage therapy. Special emphasis on the movements of massage, as well as positioning, muscle groups, and bony landmarks. The course provides an opportunity for demonstration, practice, and evaluation of skills. (Fall Semester)

Eastern Massage Therapy I | 3 Credits

This course is an introduction to Asian massage, specifically 5-Element Theory and the philosophy of Shiatsu. The course will provide demonstration and practice. (Spring Semester)

Myology | 4 Credits

This course provides an in-depth study of muscle terminology and micro anatomy and physiology of the skeletal muscle tissue. The college lab focuses on the body as a whole and how the component parts function. (Fall Semester)

Myology/Kinesiology | 4 Credits

This course provides a comprehensive study of muscle terminology and gross anatomy and physiology of the appendicular musculature. The student is introduced to kinesiology. (Spring Semester)

Western Massage Therapy II | 4 Credits

This course provides an in depth study of advanced massage therapy techniques, range of motion and stretching techniques, palpation, client assessment, medical massage, and pain management and treatment plans. The course provides demonstration and practice. (Spring Semester)

Eastern Massage Therapy II | 3 Credits

This course presents a continuation of Eastern Massage Therapy I, including Yin and Yang Meridians as well as finger-pressure massage. The course provides demonstration and practice of these techniques as well as charting and intake skills. (Fall Semester)

Professional Development | 1 Credit

This course provides an in-depth study of professional ethics and business practices. (Spring Semester)

Applied Pathophysiology | 3 Credits

This course provides an overview of procedures for treating complicating pathological conditions, working with other health care providers and developing massage therapy treatment plans. (Spring Semester)

Sports & Rehab Massage Therapy | 3 Credits

This course will present the basics of sports and rehab massage. Myofascial and trigger point therapy work will be explored through demo and practice. The course will be offered as a 3 credit hands-on massage therapy elective. (Spring Semester)

Thai Massage | 3 Credits

This course offers a fundamental introduction to Nuad Bo-Rarn, the traditional massage of Thailand, levels I and II. Thai massage incorporates facilitated stretching similar to assisted yoga. Students completing levels I and II will be able to perform a full body Thai massage including front, back, side, and seated position. (Spring Semester)

Pregnancy Massage | 3 Credits

This course will provide an opportunity to learn massage techniques specifically for pregnancy. Other aspects that will be addressed, but will not be limited to, are: anatomy and physiology, cautions/contraindications, emotional aspects of pregnancy, postpartum massage, and marketing. (Spring Semester)

Reflexology | 3 Credits

This course will provide students with a working knowledge of the basics of reflexology, a hands-on body work technique designed to promote health and wellness. The history, development, and application of this approach will be studied, as well as the specific treatment techniques. Students will be able to provide a full treatment upon completion of the course which is both therapeutic and relaxing. (Spring Semester)

Clinical Practicum I | 1 Credit

The first Clinical Practicum experience, only offered to third semester students, provides the opportunity to practice massage therapy in a clinical setting under the supervision of a clinical instructor. The clinic is open to the public and provides hands-on practice in an environment similar to the workplace. (Fall Semester)

Clinical Practicum II | 1 Credit

The second Clinical Practicum experience, only offered to fourth semester students, continues practice opportunities for massage therapy in a clinical setting under the supervision of a clinical instructor. The Clinic is open to the public and provides hands-on practice in an environment similar to the workplace. (Spring Semester)

Massage Therapy Seminar | 1 Credit

This fourth semester course offers students an opportunity to integrate knowledge gained throughout the program in a review process in preparation for the state licensing exam. (Spring Semester)

Mathematics Elective | 3 Credits

Pre-Algebra* | 3 Credits

A foundation level course to provide students with essential mathematical skills for college programs which require basic algebra skills. Topics include basic operations with decimals, fractions and integers, percent applications, proportions, algebraic expressions, an introduction to solving linear equations, graphing linear equations and the metric system. (Fall, Spring and Summer Semesters) *Institutional credit only *Placement is based on ACCUPLACER scores. *Students must receive a grade of C (2.0) or higher to pass this course. Fulfills program prerequisite for High School Algebra.

Introduction to Algebra* | 3 Credits

This course provides a study of solving first degree equations and inequalities. Other topics include: graphing linear equations and inequalities, solving word problems, scientific notation, and adding, subtracting, multiplying and dividing monomials and polynomials. (Fall, Spring and Summer Semesters) *Institutional credit only *Placement is based on Accuplacer scores. *Students must receive a grade of C (2.0) or higher to pass this course. Fulfills second math prerequisite.

Logical Reasoning and Decision Making | 3 Credits

This course introduces students to both informal and formal logic; and students will use the developed logic to evaluate decisions for given situations. Topics include: informal logical games, logical fallacies, truth tables, logical equivalence, sentential logic with proofs, categorical logic, probability, expected value, and decision making. (This course is cross listed in Philosophy PH107-credit will not be granted for both PH107 and MA107)

College Algebra and Statistics with Business Applications | 3 Credits

This course provides students foundations in algebra and statistics as preparation for the demands of quantitative reasoning in the field of business. Topics on algebra include: function, linear, quadratic, radicals, exponential, logarithmic, and inverse functions. Topics on statistics include: measures of central tendency, measures of variations, measures of positions, counting principles, probability, expected value, and regressions. Applications to business and finance problems are a focus.

College Algebra with Trigonometry | 4 Credits

This pre-calculus course is designed to develop mathematic skills so that students are adequately prepared for calculus and other college-level science courses. Algebra topics covered include: radicals, quadratic functions, rational functions, logarithmic, exponential and their inverse functions, and systems of linear equations. Trigonometry topics include right triangle trigonometry, trigonometric ratios and identities. Graphing is emphasized in both algebra and trigonometry topics.

Statistics I | 3 Credits

An introduction to Statistics with modern applications to Sociology, Business, Economics, Ecology, Health Science and Psychology. Topics include: descriptive statistics, central tendency, percentile rank, Z-Scores, probability, probability distribution, correlation and regression analysis. (Fall and Spring Semesters)

Calculus I | 4 Credits

This is a study of differential and integral calculus with analytic geometry. Various types of functions with their derivatives, applications including curve plotting, maxima and minima problems, and related rates. Integration problems, including the area between two curves and the trapezoidal rule.

Statistical Methods | 3 Credits

This introductory statistics course focuses on several topics: population and samples; data organization and representation; measures of central tendency, variation, and position; basic probability and probability distribution; normal distribution; confidence interval; hypothesis testing of one population: z-test and t-test; type I and type II errors; linear regression; and non-parametric statistics. Statistics applications are drawn from several disciplines such as sociology, business, economics, ecology, health science, and psychology. This course uses a graphing calculator and computer statistical software.

Statistics II | 3 Credits

This course continues the study of Statistics and takes up normal distribution, linear regression, sampling techniques and hypothesis testing, as well as analysis of variance and non-parametric statistics.

Calculus II | 4 Credits

This course includes the transcendental functions; methods of integration with applications to volumes, polar coordinates, vectors and parametric equations, and infinite series.

Quantitative Research Methods | 3 Credits

This hands-on research methods course introduces students to a variety of quantitative methods to investigate research questions. Students will collect data, and using statistics software students will analyze and interpret data and then present the findings in formal reports. Through the experience of investigation, students will develop quantitative research, statistical analysis, and report-writing skills. (Spring Semester)

Orientation to Medical Assisting | 2 Credits

This course is designed as a comprehensive overview of the profession of Medical Assisting. Learning opportunities are provided for the student to develop skills in the three areas of competencies for Medical Assisting--Transdisciplinary, Clinical and Administrative. (Fall Semester)

Diagnostic and Clinical Laboratory Procedures | 3 Credits

This course introduces the student to the theory and laboratory practice of diagnostic testing and techniques and clinical lab skills necessary for the Medical Assistant. Patient preparation for diagnostic testing will be emphasized. (Spring Semester)

Medical Assistant - Clinical Procedures | 3 Credits

This course provides the theory and laboratory practice of clinical procedures performed in a health care setting by a medical assistant. Theory includes study of vital signs, aseptic techniques, assisting with minor office surgery, general physical exams and a basic knowledge of possible medical emergencies. The role of providing empathy and support for the patient is emphasized. (Fall Semester)

Medical Assistant Clinical Seminar and Externship | 4 Credits

A supervised clinical experience in an appropriate medical setting provides the student with an opportunity to apply clinical and administrative procedures and competencies. One hour weekly seminars will be scheduled to review clinical competencies, the clinical experience and current health and legal issues as it applies to the medical assistant. (Spring Semester)

Medical Terminology | 3 Credits

This course is a study of the language of medicine as it relates to all body systems.  Emphasis is placed on the understanding of word roots, prefixes, suffixes and abbreviations.  Terminology related to anatomy, physiology, laboratory, clinical procedures and pharmacology will be covered.  Pronunciation and spelling will be emphasized.  (Fall and Spring Semesters)

Medical Office Systems & Procedures | 3 Credits

This course covers the responsibilities performed by the medical administrative assistant in a contemporary medical office including patient relations, appointment scheduling, insurance billing and collection, management of medical records, and report generation.  Various simulated office procedures are included.  (Spring Semester)

Medical Transcription I | 3 Credits

This introductory course gives the student the opportunity to acquire skills in the fowing field of medical transcription.  Carious medical documents such as histories and physicals, operative reports, pathology reports, radiology reports, and discharge summaries will be transcribed.  Formatting and proofreading skills are emphasized in this course. (Spring Semester)

Insurance & Reimbursement Processing | 2 Credits

This course covers the principles and practice of health insurance billing and reimbursement.  Students will learn what impact managed care and state and federal regulations have on health insurance billing.  Guidelines for completing claims for inpatient, outpatient, emergency department, and physician office encounters using the appropriate forms will be covered.  Students will learn about claims submission using Electronic Date Interchange (EDI).  Simulations, real world examples and review exercises will give students the opportunity to apply learned material.  (Fall and Spring Semesters)

Music Elective | 3 Credits

Music Survey Course | 1 Credit

An survey of the fundamentals and development of the art of music in Western Civilization. Emphasis will be given to how music relates, influences, enriches and dignifies our lives. Includes a segment on the healing aspects of music.

Music Appreciation | 3 Credits

Introduces the student to the elements and principles of music, and the lives, works, and historical settings of significant composers of the past. A segment on the healing aspects of music is also included.

Class Piano and Basic Musicianship | 3 Credits

Beginning and intermediate level music theory and piano performance. Topics include: sight reading, ear training, technical aspects of piano playing, improvisation and application of theory to performance.

Independent Study | 3 Credits

The study by a qualified student of a more advanced phase of music under the supervision of a member of the music faculty. Plans must be approved by the Director of Liberal Arts. (Offered as needed)

Health Assessment and Promotion | 1 Credit

This course is designed to assist students in acquiring knowledge of basic physical and psychosocial skills related to nursing practice and health promotion. Emphasis will be on normal assessment findings and recognizing deviations from normal. The campus laboratory provides the opportunity for instruction and practice of related nursing techniques. (Fall and Spring Semester - Day and Evening) Ten classroom hours and fifteen laboratory hours.

Nursing Concepts | 5 Credits

This course will focus on the nurse's role in health assessment, health maintenance, and health promotion across the life span. Students are introduced to basic principles, skills, and concepts of nursing practice. This course uses Nursing Process within the framework of Orem's Theory. A structured campus laboratory setting assists students in learning technical skills. Students will begin to integrate the roles of the Associate Degree Nurse as provider of care, manager of care, and member within the discipline of nursing through classroom, laboratory and hospital and community experiences. (Fall and Spring Semester - Day and Evening) Three classroom hours and six clinical/laboratory hours per week.

Medication Essentials I | 1 Credit

The theory component of this course will focus on pharmacological principles that the professional nurse applies in the administration of medications. The nursing process will be used as a framework to identify nursing responsibilities related to medication administration. The campus laboratory component will provide students with the opportunity to accurately calculate, prepare, and administer oral, topical, and injectable medications. Critical thinking situations and clinical application will be emphasized throughout the course. (Fall and Spring Semester - Day and Evening) Ten classroom hours and fifteen laboratory hours.

Medication Essentials II | 1 Credit

The theory component of this course will focus on the pharmacological principles that the professional nurse applies in the administration of medications and intravenous fluids. The nursing process will be used as a framework to identify nursing responsibilities related to major drug classifications, intravenous therapy and the use of intermittent infusion devices and pumps. The campus laboratory component will provide students with the opportunity to accurately calculate, prepare and administer medications via the intravenous route. Critical care and pediatric medication calculation will also be presented. (Fall and Spring Semester - Day and Evening) Twelve classroom hours and nine laboratory hours.

Professional Issues I | 1 Credit

An overview of the historical development of nursing and nursing education will be presented. Emphasis will be placed on the nurse's role in the delivery of health care and the ethical and legal responsibilities relevant to the nurse in today's society. Lecture, discussion and computer assignments will be utilized to promote student learning. (Fall and Spring Semester - Day and Evening) Seven and one half classroom hours.

Health Restoration I | 6 Credits

In this course, the Nursing Process will be used within the framework of Orem's Theory to identify nursing care needs of patients experiencing acute and chronic cardiovascular, respiratory, gastrointestinal, fluid and electrolyte and acid-base health deviations and diabetes. Assessment skills, basic concepts and health promotion will be incorporated. On-campus laboratory experiences will provide instruction and practice of advanced clinical skills. Clinical experience will be provided in an acute care hospital setting. (Fall and Spring Semester - Day and Evening) Three classroom hours, one seminar hour, two laboratory hours, and six clinical hours per week.

Maternal Newborn Nursing | 2 Credits

Classroom theory and clinical experiences will provide a foundation for nursing care of childbearing women through pregnancy, labor and birth, the post-partum period and newborn stage. The nurse's role in health promotion, health maintenance and health restoration will be emphasized. Independent and supervised clinical experiences, lecture, discussion, seminars, simulation lab and computer assignments will be utilized to promote student learning. (Fall and Spring Semesters - Day and Evening) Classes begin early August for Fall semester and the first week in January for the spring semester. One and one half (1 1/2) classroom hours/week and twenty-three clinical hours per semester.

Introduction to Perioperative Nursing | 4 Credits

This elective course provides theoretical and clinical experiences to introduce the student as well as the graduate nurse to the role and function of the perioperative nurse. The emphasis is on the role and responsibilities of the nurse caring for the surgical client in the pre-, intra- and immediate-post operative phases. Course content includes: aseptic technique, nursing process, assessment of the surgical client, and an introduction to instruments and equipment used in surgery. The inter-relationship of preoperative care, positioning, incisions and sutures, wound healing, and postoperative care will be considered. Ethical and legal aspects of perioperative nursing will be discussed.

Health Restoration II | 5 Credits

In this course, the Nursing Process will be used within the framework of Orem's Theory to identify nursing care needs of patients experiencing acute and chronic endocrine, hematological, musculoskeletal, respiratory, shock, sensory, and immunological health deviations. Concepts related to cancer will also be introduced. Clinical experiences will be provided in acute care hospital settings. (Fall and Spring Semesters - Day and Evening) Three classroom hours and six clinical hours per week.

Professional Issues II | 0 Credit

This is the second course presented on contemporary professional issues. The student will be provided with opportunities to explore current nursing issues. Emphasis will be placed on the role of the nurse as manager of care and member within the discipline of nursing. Students will be assisted in the transition from student to graduate role: preparation for professional licensure, exploration of employment and further educational opportunities. Lecture discussion, case studies and computer assignments will be utilized to promote student learning. (Fall and Spring Semesters - Day and Evening) Class begins in early August for the Fall semester and the first week of January for the Spring semester. Seven and one half classroom hours per semester.

Pediatric Nursing | 2 Credits

Classroom theory and clinical experiences will provide a foundation for nursing of children and their families from birth through adolescence. The nurse's role in health promotion, health maintenance, and health restoration will be emphasized. Supervised clinical experiences, lecture, discussion, research and computer assignments will be utilized to promote student learning. (Fall and Spring Semesters - Day and Evening) Classes begin early August for fall semester and the first week in January for the spring semester. One and one half (1 1/2) classroom hours/week and twenty-three clinical hours per semester.

Mental Health Nursing | 2 Credits

This course utilizes the nursing process within Orem's framework in providing care to patients experiencing psychosocial problems. The focus will be on health promotion, health maintenance, and health restoration. Roles of the Associate Degree Nurse as provider and manager of care and member within the discipline of nursing as they relate to mental health will be explored and applied. Lectures, seminars, and selected clinical experiences in hospital and community settings will be utilized as learning modalities. (Fall and Spring Semester - Day and Evening) Classes begin early-August for Fall semester and first week in January for Spring semester. One and one half classroom hours per week and twenty-three clinical hours per semester.

Health Restoration III | 7 Credits

In this course, the Nursing Process will be used within the framework of Orem's Theory to provide students with learning activities for patients experiencing acute and complex health deviations. Topics related to acute cardiovascular, neurological and renal health deviations, burns, women's health, and disaster preparedness will be presented. Students are expected to function more independently, using previous knowledge and experience in assuming the role of educator, manager of care and provider of care for clients in a variety of clinical and community settings. (Fall and Spring Semester - Day and Evening) Three classroom hours and twelve clinical hours per week.

Comprehensive Health Assessments for Nursing Practice | 4 Credits

Focuses on developing and utilizing comprehensive caring for individuals and population units across the lifespan.   Olans intervention strategies relative to the needs, problems, and level of wellness of the population unit. Emphasizes systematic and comprehensive health assessments will be emphasized as a database for identifying nursing diagnoses and nursing intervention plans.  Combines lecture and on-campus simulation laboratory experiences to develop advanced skills in assessment of physical, cognitive, spiritual, socioeconomic, genetic and environmental domains.

Introduction to Nursing Care Informatics | 2 Credits

Teaches the use of information technology to access, retrieve, organize and evaluate information related to evidence based nursing practice. Using a problem-based approach, students will use information technology resources to examine health related problems, obtain and organize pertinent information, and professionally communicate findings.

Research Procedures in Nursing Practice | 3 Credits

Emphasis is on accessing, analyzing and critiquing research in scientific literature to determine implications for practice. The importance of evidence based practice in relation to patient outcomes is examined.  Specific elements of the research process including problem identification, literature review, variables, research design, sampling concepts, data collection, data analysis and interpretation are explored.  Critical evaluation of research studies and the development of a research proposal including a review of the literature and design method will be included.

Family Nursing Care Across a Lifespan | 3 Credits

This course focuses on the family as a basic unit of society and promotion of family health across the lifespan. The role of the professional nurse as teacher, counselor and advocate will be emphasized in health promotion as well as dealing with the family unit challenged by acute, episodic illness/injury or chronic conditions/disabilities. Based on Orem’s Self-Care Model and the nursing process, the student will develop the skills to provide family-centered, outcome oriented nursing care to care for the needs of diverse families. Major theories related to family nursing will be explored. Topics include variables affecting families, family assessment, cultural diversity, anticipatory guidance, multigenerational families and family as care giver. The impact of adding, separating and dealing with the death of family members will be included.

Nursing Theory and Practice Issues | 3 Credits

Students will explore selected nursing theorists and the concepts of person, health and environment as a basis for implementing and evaluating nursing care. Issues and trends that influence professional nursing practice will be discussed. How the practice of nursing has adapted to change throughout the years and how today’s health care delivery impacts professional nursing practice will be addressed.

Community Health Nursing: Individual and Family | 3 Credits

This course examines the nurse’s role in delivery of primary health/community based services focusing on health promotion, disease prevention and management of episodic illnesses. Addresses health risks of age groups across the lifespan within the context of family, culture, and socioeconomic level. Epidemiological considerations apply to community settings; public health mandates will be considered. Healthy People goals and other national initiatives provide direction for developing nursing strategies.

Leadership and Management for Professional Practice | 3 Credits

Focuses on the role of the professional nurse as a leader in today’s health care environment. Students will identify various leadership styles and compare and contrast leadership and management behaviors. Class discussions will include organizational structure and behavior, work place issues important to the nurse manager, delegation and change theory. Motivational and decision making strategies, conflict management principles, and quality care for positive patient outcomes and patient safety will be addressed.

Pharmacology for the Registered Nurse | 3 Credits

This course correlates knowledge of human physiology, pathophysiology, and pharmacology as they relate to the RN’s role in the administration of medication therapies across the lifespan.  The basic concepts of pharmacokinetics, metabolism, therapeutic and toxic effects, and drugs with multiple indications are discussed. Particular focus is given to the major neurological receptors. Prototypes of the major drug classes are used as a model to give a comprehensive view of pharmacological treatment of the major disease categories.

Clinical Seminar | 2 Credits

Preceptor guided seminar in an area of student choice with an emphasis on the application of baccalaureate level nursing knowledge. Integrates evidence-based practice, clinical judgment, interprofessional perspectives and patient preferences to improve patient care. Differences between pedagogy and andragogy will be explored. Content derived from clinical situations will be encountered. Students will share clinical reports and raise critical questions regarding practice issues.

Professional Nursing Syntheses / Clinical Capstone | 4 Credits

This course will allow students to demonstrate integration of baccalaureate nursing knowledge and practice in professional systems and settings. Students will be provided opportunities for synthesis and evaluation of professional nursing role behaviors essential to care of clients experiencing complex care needs in a variety of settings. Emphasis is on critical thinking, communication, leadership, management and evaluation. The student is provided with a clinical immersion experience in a practice setting of their choice, with a professional nurse preceptor.

Foundations of Nutrition | 3 Credits

A study of the principles of the science of nutrition, as it relates to daily life and well being. Topics include personal wellness, digestion, absorption and metabolism of nutrients, planning and evaluating dietary intake. The course will consider social, economic, and psychosocial factors in relationship to dietary practices. This course provides an opportunity to explore areas of special interest such as nutrition for various age levels, weight control, and physical performance. (Fall Semester)

Introductory Foods | 3 Credits

Examines the basic concepts related to the preparation of food. Studies the principles of food preparation based on knowledge of both chemical and physical properties as well as consideration of cultural influences. Highlights the function of recipe ingredients and their effect on final product with special attention to focus on dietary modifications for disease prevention and treatment. Laboratory will include basic food preparation skills, sensory analysis of foods and investigation of a variety of cultural foods. (Fall Semester)

Nutrition Care Process | 3 Credits

The Nutrition Care Process and Model is the framework for the critical thinking process used by dietetics professionals as they provide nutrition services to their clients/patients. This course will introduce the student to the process including; nutrition assessment, diagnosis, intervention, evaluation and monitoring. This course will include a review of essential knowledge and skills needed such as understanding medical terminology and abbreviations, interpreting laboratory values and food-drug interactions, obtaining anthropometric data, the fundamentals of medical record documentation, Code of Ethics and Standards of Professional Performance for Dietetic Technicians. (Fall Semester)

Community Nutrition | 4 Credits

Introduces students to community nutrition programs serving vulnerable populations throughout the lifecycle. Legislative decisions impacting food and nutrition policies, both historical perspective and current events will be studied. Students will plan and present a nutrition program to a community audience, and have an opportunity to participate in a public policy workshop regarding federal and state nutrition concerns. The student will participate in planned community nutrition practice experiences which may include programs such as WIC, school lunch, hunger relief organizations, senior nutrition programs and community wellness programs. (Spring Semester)

Community Nutrition Practice | 2 Credits

Diet and Disease I | 3 Credits

This course examines the role nutrition and the dietetic technician play in the prevention and treatment of illness and chronic disease. Nutrition assessments and dietary modifications for the management of diseases such as cardiovascular disease, diabetes, and GI disorders will be studied. A focus on nutrition care of the elderly, and populations with developmental and cognitive deficiencies will be included. (Fall Semester)

Supervised Practice – Long-Term Care Settings | 4 Credits

The student will participate in planned supervised practice experiences located at local long term care facilities, as a student member of the Nutrition Care Team, under the supervision of a Registered Dietitian. The student will participate in the Nutrition Care Process including: nutrition assessment, diagnosis, intervention and evaluation, as well as participate in foodservice operations and management activities. The student will have the opportunity to participate in professional association activities. (Fall Semester)

Nutrition Education | 3 Credits

Promotion of healthy eating and guiding behavior change is the central goal of nutrition intervention. Motivating clients and employees requires knowledge of a variety of techniques. Students will learn theories and methods of learning, communication and counseling as they apply to individuals and groups in nutrition education and employment settings. (Spring Semester)

Foodservice Management and Operations I | 2 Credits

This course is designed to explore aspects of foodservice beginning with menu planning and development as well as food purchasing, storage, preparation, service and delivery systems. Concepts can be applied to both the institutional setting as well as in client counseling situations. (Fall Semester)

Diet and Disease II | 3 Credits

This course will examine the role nutrition and the dietetic technician play in the management of the client with complex nutrition diagnosis such as kidney disease, liver disease, cancer, HIV, and multiple medical diagnosis. Enteral and Parenteral nutrition will be studied. (Spring Semester)

Supervised Practice – Acute Care Settings | 4 Credits

The student will participate in planned supervised practice experiences at local health care facilities, as a student member of the Nutrition Care Team, under the supervision of a Registered Dietitian. The student will participate in the Nutrition Care Process including: nutrition assessment, diagnosis, intervention and evaluation as well as participate in foodservice operations and management activities. The student will have the opportunity to participate in professional association activities. (Spring Semester)

Seminar in Dietetic Technology | 1 Credit

Preparation for the student to enter the profession of dietetic technology. Students will conduct a research review of current topics in nutrition and nutrition professions. Skills in resume preparation, interviewing techniques, review for the national registration exam, preparing a professional portfolio and participation in professional dietetic association activities. (Spring Semester)

Foodservice Management and Operations II | 2 Credits

Advanced studies in foodservice which exploring management and leadership theory, trends in marketing, human resources, fiscal management, state regularions and quality management.  (Spring Semester)

Keyboarding I and Document Processing | 3 Credits

This is an introductory course focusing on a thorough understanding of the computer keyboard with touch typing techniques.  Formatting of basic documents such as business letters, envelopes, memorandums, and reports as well as proofreading skills will be developed.  (Fall Semester)

Word Processing I | 3 Credits

This introductory course provides the student with hands-on experience in the use of word processing software.  Students will learn the fundamentals such as creating, editing, saving, naming, formatting, and printing a document as well as spell check, pagination and mail merge.  (Spring Semester)

Introduction to Philosophy | 3 Credits

This course is an introduction into the basic issues of philosophy: Being, God, Knowledge, Meaning, Self, Reality, Evil and Death as they are found and presented in the history of Western Philosophy. (Fall, Spring and Summer Semesters)

Logical Reasoning and Decision Making | 3 Credits

This course introduces students to both informal and formal logic; and students will use the developed logic to evaluate decisions for given situations. Topics include: informal logical games, logical fallacies, truth tables, logical equivalence, sentential logic with proofs, categorical logic, probability, expected value, and decision making. This course is cross listed in Math MA107-credit will not be granted for both PH107 and MA107.

Ethics | 3 Credits

A study of the main ethical systems found in Western Philosophy. Investigation of particular ethical concepts such as morality and the moral ideal, good and evil, right and obligation, conscience, moral responsibility and value, and how these, along with moral principle(s), are used to guide the moral life.

Business Ethics | 3 Credits

This course is designed to examine many of the philosophies presently operative in the business world and society. Special attention is given to such issues as corporate responsibility, morality in advertising, conflicts of interest, preferential hiring, personal morality vs. loyalty to employer, and capitalism vs. socialism.

Ethics in Health Care | 3 Credits

Modern medicine and health care have created new human ethical problems. This course will explore a number of medical ethical dilemmas, such as end-of-life decisions, defining the concept of death, ordinary versus extraordinary means of treatment, reproductive issues, informed consent, confidentiality, truth-telling, withholding treatment, and the distribution of scarce medical resources, in the light of the principles of autonomy, non-maleficence, beneficence, and justice. One semester of clinical experience is strongly recommended. (Fall, Spring and Summer Semesters)

Marriage and the Family | 3 Credits

This course is designed to investigate the inner dynamism and nature of marriage and family relationships. It addresses itself to a variety of philosophical tenets, and the historical development and sociological ramifications of the institution.

Death and Dying | 3 Credits

Geared to the very heart of the question: What is death? The course will examine the phenomenon as well as the human response to it both yesterday and today by great men and women and not so famous men and women of the East and West.

Logic | 3 Credits

An introductory course to the science of logic and the principles of deductive reasoning, correct thinking and valid argumentation. Special emphasis will be placed on the traditional Aristotelian syllogism.

Philosophy of World Religions | 3 Credits

The term ‘philosophy’ comes from Greek roots meaning ‘the love of wisdom’. Philosophers ask questions such as: What is the meaning of life? What is a good life? This course will introduce students to the philosophical approach to religion and also to religious & ethical ideas from several global cultures. It will also prepare students in medicine, business and related fields for the diversity of religious and moral views they will encounter in the modern workplace in general and health care institutions in particular.

Social / Political Philosophy | 3 Credits

Course content will introduce students to the philosophical approach to ethical issues that arise in social, political and civic life. As such, it will address ethical problems at both the individual and group levels. Specifically, an overview of the major issues and theories in social-political philosophy will be discussed as well as an introduction to many of the key ethical thinkers in politics and civics arena. This course will prepare students for careers in the medical field and similar occupations for the ethical situations they will encounter in the social and political culture of the modern workplace. (Spring Semester)

Topics in Bioethics | 3 Credits

This course will introduce students to various topics of the instructor's choosing in the areas of Bioethics.  Bioethics can be seen as a branch of ethics, or more specifically, a branch of applied ethics.  In many ways bioethical disclosure presupposes ethical disclosure.  For this reason students will be introduced to an array of normative ethical theories and principles before embarking on a range of bioethical dilemma cases and topic areas.  The interdisciplinary nature of Bioethics also demands that students be introduced to the latest medical and scientific breakthroughs in areas such as stem cell research, cloning, regenerative medicine, and genetic screening.  The course will guide students through a wide range of bioethical issues which may include topics like abortion, euthanasia, embryonia stem cell research, cloning, scarce medical resources, and assisted reproduction.  Students will be expected to carry out their own original research in the arena of bioethics and will be asked to write a longer argumentive style essay in order to complete the course.

Preparatory Physics* | 3 Credits

An introduction to the basic concepts of physics with an emphasis on classical mechanisms, electricity and the structure of the atom. Course reviews simple algebra, vectors and vector addition. Three lecture hours. Students placed into MA 099 must complete that course before registering for PHY 099. *Institutional credit only

Physics I | 3 Credits

An introduction to the concepts and laws of physics. Topics include: classical mechanics, energy, momentum, rotational motion and heat. Three lecture hours.

Physics I Laboratory | 1 Credit

Laboratory experiences are based on topics covered in lecture. Two laboratory hours.

Physics II | 3 Credits

A continuation of Physics I. Topics include: electricity, magnetism, light, optics, atomic and nuclear structure. Three lecture hours.

Physics II Laboratory | 1 Credit

(formerly PH 102L) Laboratory experiences are based on topics covered in lecture. Two laboratory hours.

Fundamentals of Practical Nursing | 7 Credits

This course is designed to familiarize students with the historical development of nursing, nursing education, and the roles and responsibilities of the nurse and the healthcare team.  Development throughout the life cycle and basic nutrition and diet therapy will be discussed.  The course uses the Nursing Process within the framework of Orem's Self-care deficit theory.  A structured campus laboratory setting assists students in learning and integrating technical skills.  Clinical experiences will be provided in long-term and sub-acute health care settings.  (Fall and Spring semesters) Fourteen clinical hours per week (half semester) Sixty classroom hours and thirty laboratory hours.

Practical Nursing II | 7 Credits

This course focuses on the basic concepts of nursing.  The nursing process is utilized within the framework of Orem's self-care deficit theory to collect data in relation to individuals' abililty to care for themselves.  Psychomotor skills are demonstrated and practiced in the structured campus laboratory before they are applied in the clinical setting. Clinical experiences will be provided in acute care and sub-acurate health care settings.  (Fall and spring semester) Fourteen Clinical Hours per week (half semester) Sixty Hours and thirty laboratory hours.

Practical Nursing III | 7 Credits

This course focuses on common health deviations which affects individuals of various ages.  The nursing process will continue to be utilized to provide care for patients along the continuum with an emphasis on material, child adolcent and family health.  Assisting children and adults with a  variety of health deviations will be discussed.  Advanced psychomotor skills are practiced and evaluated in the laboratory.  Clinical experience will be provided in maternal, family pediatric, and community settings.  (Fall and Spring Semesters) Seven clinical hours per week Sixty classroom and thirty laboratory hours

Practical Nursing IV | 7 Credits

This course focuses on common health deviations which affects the geriatric population.  The nursing process will continue to be utilized to provide care for patients in various health care settings, which include mental health, extended care, ambulatory, and community care health settings.  Leadership and management skills as it relates to the LPN scope of practice will be discussed.  Advanced psychomotor skills are practiced and evaluated in the laboratory.  Clinical experiences will be provided in acute, longterm and community care settings.  (Fall and Spring Semesters) Seven clinical hours per week .  Sixty classroom hours and thirty laboratory hours.

General Psychology | 3 Credits

An introduction to the basic concepts, research methods and applications of psychology. The major theoretical perspectives are presented through such areas as sensation, perception, intelligence, cognition, personality, and abnormal behavior. The course requires a research paper. (Fall, Spring and Summer Semesters)

Developmental Psychology | 3 Credits

A study of the life span approach, from pre-natal development to aging and death. This course emphasizes physical, cognitive, intellectual, social, cultural and personality factors. Major theoretical perspectives and research findings, including cross-cultural studies, are applied throughout the course. (Fall, Spring and Summer Semesters)

Abnormal Psychology | 3 Credits

The course utilizes current classifications of mental disorders to explain abnormal behavior. Case study and other resource materials are applied to demonstrate the complexity of determining etiology, diagnosis and treatment of mental illness. Students will be required to participate in a number of experiential projects to focus self-awareness in relation to "abnormal behavior".

Human Sexuality | 3 Credits

An exploration of human sexuality in Western society. Through personal inventory questions, group discussions, lecture, and experiential learning activities, students will assess their personal attitudes, values and knowledge of various sexuality topics. Efforts to understand and respect value systems that differ from personal beliefs will be stressed.

Health Psychology | 3 Credits

Health psychology examines how biological, psychological, and social factors interact with and affect the efforts people make in promoting good health and preventing illness.  This course explores how  effectively people cope with and reduce pain and the recovery rehabilitation, and psychological adjustment of patients with serious health problems.  The course also focuses on the role of stress in illness and certain lifestyle factors, such as smoking and weight control, and specific chronic illnesses such as cancer and heart disease.  Students will be provided with training to evaluate the scientific quality of research in the field of health psychology.

Organizational Psychology | 3 Credits

Organizational Psychology is a specialized field within Psychology that attempts to understand and explain human behavior in organizational settings. Often referred to as I/O Psychology (Industrial and Organizational) this course will introduce the methods, practices, theories, and research of Organizational Psychology, which includes the social and psychological aspects of people in the workplace. Organizational processes are the focus of this course and are comprised of individual attitudes, behaviors, emotions, health, leadership, motivation, productivity, and well-being. As well as group dynamics and organizational communication, structures, and culture. A real-world application of empirical research of people in organizations will be addressed.

Social Psychology | 3 Credits

Social Psychology is a specialized field within Psychology that attempts to understand and explain human thought (mental process), perception, emotion, and behavior through intrapersonal, interpersonal, and group dynamics. Emphasis is on social perception, social influence, social relations, and applying them to western culture. Major theoretical perspectives and research findings, including multicultural aspects, are applied throughout the course.

Research Methods: Techniques and Designs | 3 Credits

Provides students with an introduction to research methods in the Behavioral Sciences. The assumptions and goals of the scientific method will be considered and various types of research techniques and designs will be studied. Students will learn the process of writing a research proposal and explore the ethics of research with human and animal subjects.

Image Acquisition and Evaluation I | 3 Credits

This course begins with the basics of conventional film and screens and x-ray tube construction.  Students then examine exposure factors and investigate density/brightness, contrast, geometric blur, beam restriction, grid use and scatter radiation and their effects on image quality.  When appropriate, students work in class on mathematical calculations, study image quality, and take images in the RT laboratory that are used for  evaluation.  (Fall Semester)

Radiographic Procedures I | 2 Credits

The lecture component of this course begins with an introduction to the specific nomenclature, as well as underlying principles of radiographic positioning. Routine and advanced positioning studies, correlated with anatomy of the upper and lower extremities, chest, abdomen, thorax, and the urinary and digestive systems are presented. (Fall Semester)

Applied Radiographic Procedures I | 1 Credit

The College Laboratory component of Radiographic Procedures I contains anatomy and positioning applications, as well as film - critique sessions. A competency-based system of evaluation is utilized. (Fall Semester) Two Laboratory Hours.

Patient Care and Management I | 1 Credit

This course is designed to assist the student to develop both general and specific interactive skills in patient care. It focuses on record maintenance and administrative procedures, ethics and medicolegal issues, patient safety and transfers, vital signs, emergency situations, infection control, oxygen delivery, EKG monitoring, and contrast media. (Fall Semester)

Clinical Education I | 2 Credits

This course requires practical clinical application of knowledge and skills, and involves clinical experiences in general radiographic areas and contrast studies. It is taken concurrently with the didactic components of the semester, and is provided at the College’s clinical affiliates. A competency - based system of evaluations is utilized. (Fall Semester) Sixteen clinical hours (two days).

Image Production and Evaluation II | 3 Credits

This course continues instruction on radiographic exposure principles with an emphasis on radiographic techniques, then digital imaging.  Students first learn technique selection and the use of automatic exposure control, anatomically programmed radiography, and technique charts.  Mathematical formulas (algebra level) are utilized for technique compensation.  Computerized radiography (CR) and direct readout (DR) digital radiography are discussed in terms of image receptors, image resolution, and processing. (Spring Semester)

Radiographic Procedures II | 2 Credits

The lecture component of this course focuses on both routine and advanced positioning studies, correlated with anatomy of the spine, thorax and skull. (Spring Semester)

Applied Radiographic Procedures II | 1 Credit

The College laboratory component of Radiographic Procedures II contains anatomy and positioning applications of the spine, thorax and skull, correlating with film-critique sessions. Again, a competency - based system of evaluation is utilized. (Spring Semester) Two Laboratory Hours.

Patient Care and Management II | 1 Credit

This course includes units on pharmacology, drug administration and monitoring of medical equipment. In addition, specialized radiographic procedures are discussed throughout this semester. (Spring Semester)

Clinical Education II | 2 Credits

In this semester, clinical experiences are provided in general radiographic areas and contrast studies with special emphasis on radiography of the skull and spinal column. It is taken concurrently with the didactic components of the semester and is provided at the College’s clinical affiliates. A competency - based system of evaluation is utilized. (Spring Semester) Sixteen clinical hours (two days).

Applied Radiologic Technology I | 6 Credits

In the first summer clinical component, the student continues to gain experience in general radiographic and contrast studies, as well as portable and surgical radiography. Experiences are provided at the College’s clinical affiliates. A competency - based system of evaluation continues to be utilized. (Summer) Forty clinical hours (five days) per week for a total of eight weeks or 320 hours.

Equipment Operation and Maintenance I | 2 Credits

This course covers basic electrical and mechanical examples as applicable to the structure and operation of radiologic equipment. Radiographic generating equipment, image intensification, quality management, and discussion on digital imaging topics as related to digital radiographic equipment and PACS are included.  (Fall Semester)

Radiation Physics and Protection | 3 Credits

This course explores the phenomena of energy conversion and the interactions between radiation and matter, the electromagnetic spectrum and related radiation concepts. Students will learn about radiation detection and monitoring and the appropriate units of measurement. All aspects of radiation protection and dose reduction for patients and occupational radiation workers are explained.  (Fall Semester)

Applied Radiologic Pathology I | 2 Credits

This course provides the student with investigation into the basic concepts of radiologic pathology. The student will research a pathologic condition and place emphasis on the disease/injury process, the radiographic appearance and treatment.  Normal anatomy/physiology is reviewed and compared with pathologic abnormalities. There is a focus on the changes which occur as a result of disease and injury which necessitates alteration of standard radiographic exposure applications. (Fall Semester)

Clinical Education III | 2 Credits

In the second year, students continue to gain general radiographic experiences, as well as begin experiences with special procedures, the emergency room, and other imaging areas. These areas include CT (Computerized Tomography), MRI (Magnetic Resonance Imaging), and Sonography. All experiences are offered at the College’s clinical affiliates. A competency - based system of evaluation continues to be utilized. (Fall Semester) Sixteen clinical hours (two days).

Radiation Biology | 2 Credits

This course begins with the effects of radiation on normal cell biology. Factors influencing the molecular and cellular response are discussed. Acute and chronic effects of radiation on tissue, organs, and whole body systems are also presented with in-utero and genetic effects. (Spring Semester)

Advanced Topics for the Radiographer | 2 Credits

This course offers the student a variety of integrated topics including: advanced positioning methods, special procedures, interventional radiography and computerized tomography (CT).  Numerous special imaging modalities are explored and communicated to the class through student research projects.  Career development engages the student with resume preparation and mock interviewing.  The student technologist will be prepared to contribute to the diagnostic imaging team upon completion of this course.  (Spring Semester)

Clinical Education IV | 2 Credits

Specialty clinical experiences continue as the students demonstrate applications of knowledge and skill. This course is taken concurrently with the didactic components of the semester and is provided at the College’s clinical affiliates. A competency - based system of evaluation continues to be utilized. (Spring Semester) Sixteen clinical hours (two days).

Applied Radiologic Technology II | 6 Credits

Clinical experience involving general radiography, contrast studies, portable radiography, surgery, and specialty examinations. In addition, the student is provided opportunities for preparation for the American Registry (R) Examination. (Summer) Forty hours (five days) per week for a total of eight weeks or 320 hours.

Sectional Anatomy for the Radiographer | 1 Credit

This course is designed to provide the Radiologic Technology student with an overview of human anatomy, viewed in body sections, as it related to imaging.  Anatomical structures are viewed in the axial, coronal and sagittal planes.  Emphasis is places on the head, neck, thorax and abdomen (Fall semester)

Mammography | 3 Credits

This is a comprehensive didactic course that will cover many areas including mammographic positioning, breast anatomy and physiology, patient preparation, mammography equipment, quality assurance and modifications for non-routine patients. (Offered as needed)

Introduction to Religious Thought | 3 Credits

An introductory course into the fundamental concepts associated with religious thought. The student will be introduced to the concepts of the sacred, the symbol, ritual and rites of passage, faith, re-birth, mystery, myth, good, evil, the relationship of one to self, community and the Absolute.

Introduction to Scripture | 3 Credits

An introductory level survey of the historical development and contents of the Bible. Major focus will be on the purpose of scripture and its role in divine revelation.

An Introduction to Christian Thought | 3 Credits

An introductory inquiry into the Christian church as a community of faith. Major focus will be on the doctrinal concepts of the Nicene Creed.

Major World Religions | 3 Credits

An introductory survey of the major religions of the world. The major focus will be on the basic beliefs and practices found in Buddhism, Christianity, Hinduism, Islam, Judaism and Shintoism.

Contemporary Social Problems | 3 Credits

This course selects, presents, and examines a given social problem such as poverty, racism, crime, drug and alcohol addiction, the problems of aging, etc.

Computed Tomography (CT) Procedure Protocols | 4 Credits

This course will provide students with detailed information concerning all general aspects of procedure protocols commonly used in computed tomography (CT). Topics discussed will include but not be limited to general patient education as it relates to the preparation, orientation, positioning, gathering of patient history information pertinent to image acquisition and the overall assessment of tomographic image data.  Representative CT images will be reviewed for quality, anatomy, physiologic content and pathology. (Spring Semester)

Computed Tomography (CT) Physics & Instrumentation | 3 Credits

This course is designed to provide students with the skills necessary to understand, acquire and assess the quality of computed tomography (CT) as well as other tomographic based image data sets. Areas to be studied include but are not limited to the historical development of CT and the subsequent evolution of magnetic resonance imaging (MRI). Also discussed are recent advances in medical imaging which continue to advance the field in structural/functional relationships such as positron emission tomography (PET) and molecular imaging. (Spring Semester)

Sectional Anatomy & Imaging Applications | 3 Credits

This course will acquaint the student on the structure and function of the human body.  A review of the organs, systems and gross anatomy will be described and discussed. Detailed study of gross anatomical structures will be conducted systematically for location, relationship to other structures and function. Sectional anatomy in the coronal, axial, sagittal and oblique planes will be emphasized in relationship to CT. (Fall Semester)

Pathology Correlation in Computed Tomography (CT) | 4 Credits

This course content is designed to introduce  theories of disease causation and  the pathophysiologic disorders that comprise healthy systems.  Etiology, pathophysiologic responses, clinical manifestations, anatomic appearance on CT and response assessment criteria relating to image data acquisitions and image artifacts will be presented. (Fall Semester)

Advanced Imaging Practicum (Clinical) | 2 Credits

This course introduces the student to the practical application of skills and knowledge obtained in the classroom that will be required to work in a clinical environment utilizing CT. This includes overview of the CT equipment, patient care, professional standards, Clinical experiences will be focused on the most commonly acquired CT data sets to include the brain, chest, abdomen and pelvis. All CT procedures will be performed under the direct supervision of a CT technologist.  This course is to be taken concurrently with didactic components of the program. Clinical experiences will be offered at affiliated clinical sites. (Spring Semester)

Advanced Patient Care & Pharmacology | 1 Credit

This course provides students with the basic concepts of patient care, including consideration for the physical and psychological needs of the patient and family. Routine and emergency patient care procedures are described as well as infection control procedures utilizing universal precautions. The role of the radiographer in patient education and radiation protection are identified. This course also includes a systemic study of radiographic contrast agents as they are used in specific organ systems of the body. Basic concepts of pharmacology will be discussed. Types of diagnostic contrast agent preparations, and principles of responsible administration, including routes and techniques, are examined. The theory and practice of basic techniques of venipuncture for the administration of diagnostic contrast agents and/or intravenous medications are included. (Spring Semester)

Computed Tomography - Capstone Seminar | 1 Credit

This course will serve as an overall review of the material presented throughout the entire course of study in the B.S. RT program. Students should use this course to prepare for the National Accreditation Examination administered by the ARRT for certification in computed tomography (CT). Students will complete a written and/or oral compilation of their CT and/or imaging science understanding focused on tomographic imaging topics obtained in the didactic as well as clinical environments acquired throughout the course of their academic career. (Spring Semester)

Principles of Sociology | 3 Credits

A basic survey of the history and fundamental principles of Sociology. Examines several of the important contributors to the discipline, its operative concepts, and its terminology. Also, studies human groups and interactions, social institutions, and the role of the group in human socialization and development. (Fall, Spring and Summer Semesters)

Sociology Of Health And Medicine | 3 Credits

This course is an introduction to the field of medical sociology. Its main thrust is on the sociological analysis of health or medical organizations and institutions. Another focus will include an examination of the social disparities in healthcare with respect to epidemiology and social status or age, sex, race, ethnicity, gender, and social class. The role of health professions in the United States will also be explored.

Coping with Illness | 3 Credits

This course offers a broad overview of the sociological aspects of coping with illness in our society. Topics include: attitudes toward and preparation for death; attitudes towards serious illness in society; the understanding of and care for terminally ill patients; funeral rituals; grief counseling; suicide; and euthanasia. Readings and classroom activities will be supplemented by students’ self-exploration and writing on feelings, attitudes, and beliefs about coping with illness.

Beginning Spanish | 3 Credits

An introduction to the fundamental language skills of the Spanish language: basic skills in understanding, speaking, writing, grammatical structure and vocabulary.

Intermediate Spanish | 3 Credits

A continuation of SP 101, this course includes further study of grammar structure and vocabulary building. Emphasis on communicating in Spanish: speaking, writing and listening skills will be the focus throughout the semester.

Medical Terminology for the Surgical Technologist | 1 Credit

This course will present the student with a study of medical terminology mostly relating to the field of surgery.  Prefixes, suffixes, root words, combining forms, special endings, pleural forms abbreviations, and symbols will be included in the content.  A programmed learning, word building system will be used to learn word parts that are used to construct and/or analyze new terms.  This will provide the student with the opportunity to decipher unfamiliar terms and check their spelling.  Emphasis will be on pronunciation.  Abbreviations will be introduced as related terms are presented. (This course is taken prior to the beginning of the first semester.)

Introduction to Surgical Technology | 4 Credits

This course introduces the student to the role of the health care team. Operating room organization, medical terminology, aseptic technique, surgical supplies, basic instrumentation and basic surgical routines will be emphasized. Introductory surgical regional anatomy will be discussed, as well as surgical microbiology as it pertains to sterilization and disinfection. Beginning aspects of the ethical/legal aspects of patient care will be introduced. Learning activities will take place in the classroom, simulated on-campus operating room, a hospital operating room and the Central Service Department of the hospital. (Fall and Spring Semesters)

Concepts of Surgical Patient Care | 2 Credits

This course introduces the Surgical Technology student to basic concepts related to surgical patient care. The patient’s needs and rights as a consumer of health care services will be examined. Principles of routine patient care, such as temperature, pulse, respiration and blood pressure, etc. and principles of infection control will be discussed. Also discussed will be the preoperative care of the surgical patient. This will include diagnostic tests with a brief overview of their meaning and importance to the surgical patient. Communication skills will be emphasized. Emergency procedures in the operating room will be included. This course is taken concurrently with ST 101. (Fall and Spring Semesters)

Clinical Education I | 2 Credits

This clinical laboratory experience takes place primarily in the simulated on-campus laboratory. There will be limited experiences in the hospital operating room setting during the course. Students are taught the basic skills necessary to begin practice in the surgical setting. Mandatory competencies of this course include scrubbing, gowning and gloving, gowning and gloving team members, back table and instrument setups, simulated draping, "opening of the abdomen," sequence of instruments and equipment. This course must be taken concurrently with ST 101. (Fall and Spring Semesters) Sixteen clinical hours (2 days).

Fundamentals of Surgical Technology | 4 Credits

This course focuses on the scrub duties and expanded instrumentation. Sterilization and disinfection will be continued as will further exploration of the ethical/legal aspects of surgical patient care and student accountability. Assisting with circulating duties and wound healing and closure concepts will be introduced. Wound closure materials and stapling devices will be explored in detail. Specialty equipment such as the use of electrocautery and the use of LASER equipment also will be introduced. Regional surgical anatomy will continue to be discussed. The care of the anesthetized patient will be included. Learning activities will take place in the classroom, in the simulated on-campus operating room and hospital operating rooms. (Fall and Spring Semester)

Surgical Pharmacology | 2 Credits

This is the study of drugs, medications and anesthesia and their use, especially as it applies to a patient’s surgical experience. Drugs used in emergency situations will be included. Anesthetics, the types, agents, and their use in the care of the surgical patient will be discussed. The ST’s role in relation to surgical pharmacology is examined. Legal issues related to pharmacology will be explored. This course is designed to be taken concurrently with ST 104. (Fall and Spring Semesters)

Clinical Education II | 2 Credits

Clinical experiences are provided in a hospital operating room. The student will be primarily assigned to the scrub technologist's role performing and applying those skills learned in the first semester. This course is taken concurrently with ST 104. The evening students take this course over the Spring semester and into the Summer. (Fall and Spring Semesters) Sixteen clinical hours (2 days)

Advanced Surgical Technology | 5 Credits

This course will focus on an overview of the surgical specialties: general surgery which includes gastro-intestinal and biliary surgical procedures, gynecology, genitourinary surgery, ear, nose and throat surgery, and head and neck surgery. Surgical procedures will be discussed in relation to supplies, instrumentation and equipment. Surgical pathology, intraoperative patient care, the sequence of the surgical procedures, as well as potential complications will be presented. Clinical practice takes place in hospital operating rooms, as well as other intraoperative care facilities. (Fall and Spring Semester)

Clinical Education III | 2 Credits

Student clinical experiences are broadened in a hospital setting with the student expanding experience in the specialty surgical areas. The student will also begin to assist with circulating duties of the technologist. This course is taken concurrently with ST 201. (Fall and Spring Semesters) Sixteen clinical hours (2 days).

Specialized Surgical Technology | 5 Credits

This course is a continuation of ST 201. It will focus on an overview of surgical specialties. Special consideration of the pediatric and older adult will be discussed. Transplant surgery including kidney, heart and lung will be explored. Clinical practice takes place in hospital operating rooms, as well as other intraoperative care facilities. During this last semester, as the student prepares for professional practice, further legal, and employment dimensions will be discussed. (Fall and Spring Semesters)

Clinical Education IV | 2 Credits

In this clinical course, students continue to gain experience in a variety of surgical settings with emphasis on more complex and specialized procedures. This course is taken concurrently with ST 203. (Fall and Spring Semesters) Sixteen clinical hours (2 days).